If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Opposing Views)   U.S. is now 51st in the world for life expectancy. It would be higher except for the increasing rate of crime, obesity, people imitating stunts on "Jackass"   (opposingviews.com) divider line 87
    More: Fail, U.S., life expectancy, developed country, obesity, interest rates  
•       •       •

1912 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Dec 2012 at 10:58 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



87 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-12-03 08:59:10 AM
I'm probably individually responsible for bringing us down a couple of ranks.

Sorry.
 
2012-12-03 09:38:00 AM
increasing rate of crime

The what now?

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-12-03 09:58:21 AM
Monaco has a wealthy population

I think you'll find a lot of correlation with this.

I'd be interested to see the U.S.'s life expectancy in the "Households above 50k" vs. "Households making below 50k" categories, or based on net worth splits. I guess it is probably hard to do that, but, I think the point is.... Life Expectancy has a lot to do with income, especially in a country that does not have society wide healthcare (which was the point of this article I suppose).

Of course, you'll also have the Lindsey Lohan's of the world bringing down the higher net worth bracket.
 
2012-12-03 10:23:07 AM

Cythraul: I'm probably individually responsible for bringing us down a couple of ranks.

Sorry.


How many murder notches do you have on your belt?
 
2012-12-03 10:36:26 AM

jaylectricity: Cythraul: I'm probably individually responsible for bringing us down a couple of ranks.

Sorry.

How many murder notches do you have on your belt?


You'll have to wait for the day that the police discover my crawl space under my house to know that number.
 
2012-12-03 11:04:14 AM
A "Jackass" reference?
 
2012-12-03 11:06:41 AM
If only there were some way to combat this...some sort of nationalized, single-payer healthcare system.
Na that's only the fevered dream of a madman.

/Also not having to work ourselves to an early grave would be nice
 
2012-12-03 11:09:35 AM

dletter: Monaco has a wealthy population

I think you'll find a lot of correlation with this.

I'd be interested to see the U.S.'s life expectancy in the "Households above 50k" vs. "Households making below 50k" categories, or based on net worth splits. I guess it is probably hard to do that, but, I think the point is.... Life Expectancy has a lot to do with income, especially in a country that does not have society wide healthcare (which was the point of this article I suppose).

Of course, you'll also have the Lindsey Lohan's of the world bringing down the higher net worth bracket.


Life Expectancy has a lot to do with income
And income dictates where you live, an inner city youth I'm sure has a lower life expectancy then someone from Knob Hill.
 
2012-12-03 11:14:04 AM
I have seen arguments in the past that USA's aggressive attention to trying to save premature births, many of which do not survive their first year, brings total life expectancy down. It is not mentioned here, and I don't know how much impact there is if any. Would like to see some data in that regard, or methodology of this study relating to deaths within the first year.
 
2012-12-03 11:16:05 AM
Stoopid 0bama trying to make me live longer. Damn socialist, marxist, capitalist, gymnast, Kenyan!
 
2012-12-03 11:17:10 AM
So... the US has basically the same life expectancy as everywhere else in the first world (around 80), and this is bad for America somehow?

Look, I'm all for single-payer health care, but bad argument is bad. Especially when it's extremely obvious you're spinning the data as hard as you can. I mean, really, you think we're going to buy that you just ran out of space on the web page and couldn't put the actual numbers for Japan, China, etc on there? We immediately know by omission that they're something like 80-82, and that you left them off because you knew that would rightfully impress basically no one.
 
2012-12-03 11:18:09 AM

Sybarite: increasing rate of crime

The what now?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 518x469]


Thank you. This fear-mongering lie about out-of-control crime in the US really annoys me.
 
2012-12-03 11:29:31 AM
Oh well, you can't be number one in everything.
 
2012-12-03 11:37:11 AM

dletter: I'd be interested to see the U.S.'s life expectancy in the "Households above 50k" vs. "Households making below 50k" categories, or based on net worth splits.


Came to say something similar. Once you get above the poverty level, average life expectancy goes way up. It is amazing to see how much high infant mortality, a common problem with the very poor, can drag down the overall average.


Jim_Callahan: Look, I'm all for single-payer health care, but bad argument is bad


Agreed. But one of the other arguments is quality of life. There are a lot of people who get injured for whatever reason and never heal quite right because of the lack of health care. I'd rather pay to have them healed than to pay for them to rot on disability.
 
2012-12-03 11:39:34 AM

Jim_Callahan: So... the US has basically the same life expectancy as everywhere else in the first world (around 80), and this is bad for America somehow?

Look, I'm all for single-payer health care, but bad argument is bad. Especially when it's extremely obvious you're spinning the data as hard as you can. I mean, really, you think we're going to buy that you just ran out of space on the web page and couldn't put the actual numbers for Japan, China, etc on there? We immediately know by omission that they're something like 80-82, and that you left them off because you knew that would rightfully impress basically no one.


A three year difference (with Canada) and 5.5 year difference (Japan) is pretty substantial.
 
2012-12-03 11:52:42 AM

Fish in a Barrel: Sybarite: increasing rate of crime

The what now?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 518x469]

Thank you. This fear-mongering lie about out-of-control crime in the US really annoys me.


Overall it's down. It bounces around for some places.

In 2009, where I live had a spike in crime. 2010 we dropped. 2011 has dropped This year, crime is on the rise again. Can't imagine why.

(The county is closing jail beds, last week they release 31 more people early, and one guy was back in jail an hour later for bank robbery, another has already been arrested again now . They didn't even bother arresting a junkie that was causing problems last week http://www.sfgate.com/news/crime/article/Oregon-budget-cuts-mean-crimi nal-suspect-goes-free-4073515.php, because they knew he'd be right back out on the street the next day.
 
2012-12-03 11:54:37 AM

Sybarite: increasing rate of crime

The what now?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 518x469]


And furthermore:
img.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-03 12:11:02 PM
how many countries above the US on that list have socialized medicine?
 
2012-12-03 12:13:32 PM

Gunny Highway: A "Jackass" reference?


Maybe it's a Jackass 3 in 3D reference.

/You haven't lived until you've seen a bowel movement in 3D. Oh Jeebus.
 
2012-12-03 12:15:48 PM

Dansker: Sybarite: increasing rate of crime

The what now?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 518x469]

And furthermore:
[img.photobucket.com image 768x616]


Thanks, do you happen to have the stats on burglarsonarceny?
 
2012-12-03 12:18:04 PM
Wealth verses health. Kind of freakin' obvious isn't it?

I grew up through the 'Healthy' decades, where science was killing off Polio, vaccinations were popping up for everything, the Food Pyramid appeared and actually considered whole milk and red meat healthy, where you didn't have to take out a lone to buy meat, fresh fruit, veggies or fish.

Dr.s made house calls and a day in a semi-private room at the hospital cost around $50. Dr.s often carried people on the books and health insurance would not bankrupt you. A visit to the dentist would run around $20 to have a tooth pulled. (Last dentist I checked into charged $160 just to look at your mouth to determine what needed to be done. He didn't pull teeth either. He gave you a $750 root canal instead.)

It was after the Saudi's pulled their oil shortage thing and threw the global economy into a mess in the mid 70's that everything health related took a big jump. When the 80'shiat, Yuppies started the 'sue everyone for everything' trend and the health care system took another massive price jump.

(See, instead of just suing the Dr or hospital, it became profitable to sue everyone from the nurses to the groundskeepers, sue the medication sellers and the medication developers along with anyone who had anything to do with manufacturing medical equipment and supplies. Malpractice insurance costs soared and even home health care workers had to carry liability insurance.)

By the 90's, health care had become a billion dollar a year business. The government closed State mental institutions because they cost too much, dumping the mentally ill onto the streets, so, naturally, up popped private mental institutions, more than willing to help folks with their problems provided they could pay the enormous fees.

(An addiction clinic charges $700 a day with a minimum stay of 30 days.)

Suing anything medical became the mainstay of many a lawyers business. Certain medical practices got hit so hard that we developed shortages of the physicians and those who remained started charging huge sums, with many wanting payment up front.

Your OBGYN or 'Baby Dr' got sued so many times, that his fees tripled, because so many things can go wrong with a developing fetus that lawyers were having a field day. Many Dr.s changed their practice, creating a shortage.

Assorted companies also decided to charge hugely for medical equipment that the average craftsman could make in his shop for a fraction of the price. I personally dealt with a torsion splint, an apparatus designed to slowly straighten a patient's limb after post surgical contractions have shortened the tendons and muscles. It consisted of a canvass and Velcro sling, two adjustable metal bars, a couple of spring loaded pivots and a T-handle screwdriver to adjust the tension.

It gradually forced the limb to straighten out via adjustable pressure, stretching the contracted tendons and muscles.

The screwdriver was about 6 inches long with a movable T bar in one end. Basically, standard flat tip. It was used to turn a couple of stainless steel adjustment screws on the pivot points to vary the tension.

The screwdriver alone was $60. I could have bought one that would work just fine for $5.00 or less from Walmart. The entire brace was $6000. The canvass sling that actually held the limb started fraying after several months. Outfitters who deal in canvass items for hunters could have made one for $25.00 and it would have lasted years.

The whole assembly was 'custom made' for the patient from essentially off the shelf parts stored in the manufacturers warehouse. No part had to be specially machined.

IMO, the maximum charge for the device should have been $200 and that because the parts were durable and rust proof.
BTW. The company would buy back the brace when it was no longer needed. Their price? $50. It would then be refurbished, cleaned and shipped out to someone else for $6000.

Physicians were sued when they did not administer enough tests, which were costly, and might have turned up the health problem. HMO's got into the act by needing to approve tests, which meant they could delay them for months or deny them.

So, physicians, who had been trying to save the patients money, started administering blanket tests -- just to be safe and cover their arses from lawsuits. Then they were accused and sued over ordering too many tests.

By today, the cost of medical care has gone up beyond what anyone ever dreamed of. No one ever expected to have to pay $400 for one pill and I found out that 15 minutes in an MRI machine equals $1000.

Oh, the $50 hospital room rate? Try $1000. That's with the hospital also running on less staff due to financial cutbacks.

Fifteen minutes with my personal physician, not including any treatments, can cost $100. It used to be $20 for an hour. Plus, I now need to have other physicians to handle various ills.

My elderly Mom has one Primary Physician and about 6 to 8 secondaries. Her average office visit is 20 to 30 minutes.

As a kid, when we needed an ambulance, one arrived at no charge. Now, a cop arrives first, followed by the ambulance, followed by the Firehouse paramedics. Three agencies.

One of her last bills for an ambulance call was $526. Granted they did an excellent job, keeping her breathing until she got to the ER, where they took over and solved the problem. Yet, years back, the crew would have done the same with ONE agency and our city paid the bill. We did NOT charge for ambulance services.

We do now.
A whole lot of folks do not go to the Dr. until they're so sick they can't stand it because of the costs. A lot more can't afford the cost of health insurance. The cost of seeing a dentist has gone up at least 8 times in cost from when I was a kid. (Dentures, back then, were $200. Now they can run $5000. Implants start at around $1000 per tooth!

We're seeing more and more people showing up at the ER with major dental infections that have become life endangering than ever before and most ER's will NOT treat dental unless you've an infection that is eating your face off or has turned into blood poisoning.

Dental work has become so costly that many insurance companies will no longer offer coverage for it. Yet bad teeth can affect your overall health, damage your heart, screw up your immune system, throw your diet severely out of whack -- causing serious malnutrition and give you a constant, low grade infection. Any chronic associated pain can affect you emotionally and mentally.
Basically, it can f**k you up.

So, yeah, I can understand how health care equaling greater life spans is tied to one's wealth.

No money?

Then die and try not to do it too noisily. Hope your survivors have money because that $1000 funeral from the 60's is now about $10,000. If not, then a paupers grave in a cardboard casket is for you.
 
2012-12-03 12:26:14 PM

squeez cheez: I have seen arguments in the past that USA's aggressive attention to trying to save premature births, many of which do not survive their first year, brings total life expectancy down. It is not mentioned here, and I don't know how much impact there is if any. Would like to see some data in that regard, or methodology of this study relating to deaths within the first year.


Maybe they're doing Republican counting, and counting all the miscarriages and abortions as dead children.
 
2012-12-03 12:39:01 PM
China, Venezuala and Cuba all have socialized medicine too. Where do they rank?
 
2012-12-03 12:51:50 PM

squeez cheez: I have seen arguments in the past that USA's aggressive attention to trying to save premature births, many of which do not survive their first year, brings total life expectancy down. It is not mentioned here, and I don't know how much impact there is if any. Would like to see some data in that regard, or methodology of this study relating to deaths within the first year.


Yeah, this.

Plus, I have heard a lot of the third world countries that have a high life expectancy don't include stillborn babies and infants that die for whatever reason in their averages, which can certainly throw it off.

I am for single-payer health care system, but loaded statistic is loaded.
 
2012-12-03 12:54:09 PM

Chief_ Danz153A: Stoopid 0bama trying to make me live longer. Damn socialist, marxist, capitalist, gymnast, Kenyan!

 
2012-12-03 12:54:46 PM

machoprogrammer: squeez cheez: I have seen arguments in the past that USA's aggressive attention to trying to save premature births, many of which do not survive their first year, brings total life expectancy down. It is not mentioned here, and I don't know how much impact there is if any. Would like to see some data in that regard, or methodology of this study relating to deaths within the first year.

Yeah, this.

Plus, I have heard a lot of the third world countries that have a high life expectancy don't include stillborn babies and infants that die for whatever reason in their averages, which can certainly throw it off.

I am for single-payer health care system, but loaded statistic is loaded.


Stillborn babies are not counted anywhere. However, if an infant dies within the first hour or two it's classified as sillborn in many countries where the US calls it alive. If you adjust for this, the US infant mortality rate is actuallly damn good.
 
2012-12-03 01:02:10 PM

Moopy Mac: Jim_Callahan: So... the US has basically the same life expectancy as everywhere else in the first world (around 80), and this is bad for America somehow?

Look, I'm all for single-payer health care, but bad argument is bad. Especially when it's extremely obvious you're spinning the data as hard as you can. I mean, really, you think we're going to buy that you just ran out of space on the web page and couldn't put the actual numbers for Japan, China, etc on there? We immediately know by omission that they're something like 80-82, and that you left them off because you knew that would rightfully impress basically no one.

A three year difference (with Canada) and 5.5 year difference (Japan) is pretty substantial.


Fun fact: the life expectancy of Japanese-Americans is 84.5 (per US Dept of HHS). The life expectancy of Japanese living in Japan is 82.9 (per Google).

Life expectancy has MUCH more to do with diet, exercise, and genetics than it does with first-world level medical care.
 
2012-12-03 01:03:44 PM
USA! USA! USA!
 
2012-12-03 01:07:04 PM
If one takes out the effects of race (blacks in particular live shorter lives than American whites), our life expectancy is as good as other western countries with large populations. Non-story.
 
2012-12-03 01:12:05 PM
So what happens if we take the South out of the equation? Top 5 would be my bet.
 
2012-12-03 01:12:17 PM

cig-mkr: Life Expectancy has a lot to do with income
And income dictates where you live, an inner city youth I'm sure has a lower life expectancy then someone from Knob H


The island of Icaria clashes with that viewpoint. Read Up

I think Okinawa also clashes with the income trap. The biggest problems might be stress and diet. I've perfected my stress levels and now I need to perfect my diet.
 
2012-12-03 01:12:40 PM

Sybarite: increasing rate of crime

The what now?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 518x469]


There needs to be a 'beetus line.
 
2012-12-03 01:15:41 PM

Jim_Callahan: I mean, really, you think we're going to buy that you just ran out of space on the web page and couldn't put the actual numbers for Japan, China, etc on there? We immediately know by omission that they're something like 80-82, and that you left them off because you knew that would rightfully impress basically no one.


Japan is #5 at 82.25 years, China is #106 at 73.47
 
2012-12-03 01:17:26 PM
Liberal statistics are always farking awful.

Normalize the countries by racial makeup and get back to me.

Also normalize it by obesity.

Taking a comparison between radically different population sets is beyond dumb.
 
2012-12-03 01:34:02 PM

Rik01: where you didn't have to take out a lone to buy meat, fresh fruit, veggies or fish.


While I agree with the rest of your rant, this part at least is bullshiat.

The dietary problem in this country boils down to one thing: laziness. Fatass Americans don't want to go buy something from the sides or back of the grocery store and then bring it home and try to figure out how to make a meal out of it, they would rather walk down the middle aisles and grab the prepackaged meals in a box and frozen tv dinners. I can make a crockpot full of soup from fresh ingredients that will last my wife and I 3-4 days for less than $10. That same $10 will buy a single value meal at a fast food restaurant, which is where fatass America also loves to eat. So they end up spending $60-80 for the same amount of food and then complain that they have to do it because food costs so much that they can't afford to cook for themselves. The problem isn't the cost; it is ignorant, lazy, fatass America.
 
2012-12-03 01:36:01 PM

MyRandomName: Liberal statistics are always farking awful.

Normalize the countries by racial makeup and get back to me.

Also normalize it by obesity.

Taking a comparison between radically different population sets is beyond dumb.


Not sure if trolling or just stupid...
 
2012-12-03 02:00:55 PM

Mr. Eugenides: machoprogrammer: squeez cheez: I have seen arguments in the past that USA's aggressive attention to trying to save premature births, many of which do not survive their first year, brings total life expectancy down. It is not mentioned here, and I don't know how much impact there is if any. Would like to see some data in that regard, or methodology of this study relating to deaths within the first year.

Yeah, this.

Plus, I have heard a lot of the third world countries that have a high life expectancy don't include stillborn babies and infants that die for whatever reason in their averages, which can certainly throw it off.

I am for single-payer health care system, but loaded statistic is loaded.

Stillborn babies are not counted anywhere. However, if an infant dies within the first hour or two it's classified as sillborn in many countries where the US calls it alive. If you adjust for this, the US infant mortality rate is actuallly damn good.


Just found a reference to back this up:

...the advanced countries for which we find evidence of proportionately large undercounting tend to have much lower rates of birth registration of births under 500 g than those with low estimated undercounting, such as Australia, Canada, and the United States.

Short version: once we account for other countries' underreporting of live births, the US moves up several ranks in terms of infant mortality. Still not the best, but we're no longer an outlier (see table 5).
 
2012-12-03 02:05:07 PM

meanmutton: Moopy Mac: Jim_Callahan: So... the US has basically the same life expectancy as everywhere else in the first world (around 80), and this is bad for America somehow?

Look, I'm all for single-payer health care, but bad argument is bad. Especially when it's extremely obvious you're spinning the data as hard as you can. I mean, really, you think we're going to buy that you just ran out of space on the web page and couldn't put the actual numbers for Japan, China, etc on there? We immediately know by omission that they're something like 80-82, and that you left them off because you knew that would rightfully impress basically no one.

A three year difference (with Canada) and 5.5 year difference (Japan) is pretty substantial.

Fun fact: the life expectancy of Japanese-Americans is 84.5 (per US Dept of HHS). The life expectancy of Japanese living in Japan is 82.9 (per Google).

Life expectancy has MUCH more to do with diet, exercise, and genetics than it does with first-world level medical care.


Diet, exercise, and lying about whether your relative has died in order to collect their pension.

More than 230,000 elderly people in Japan who are listed as being aged 100 or over are unaccounted for, officials said following a nationwide inquiry.

An audit of family registries was launched last month after the remains of the man thought to be Tokyo's oldest were found at his family home.

Relatives are accused of fraudulently receiving his pension for decades.
 
I think 230,000 people over the age of 100 (plus lots more under the age of 100) are enough people to impact a nation's expected lifespan statistics.
 
2012-12-03 02:11:46 PM

MyRandomName: Liberal statistics are always farking awful.

Normalize the countries by racial makeup and get back to me.

Also normalize it by obesity.

Taking a comparison between radically different population sets is beyond dumb.


The truly dumb idea here is yours. The numbers you want to normalize are in fact a large component of the independent variable being analyzed in the first place. No one has ever shown any significant difference in lifespan according to race that is not adequately explained by cultural differences like diet and lifestyle. And obesity is one of those diet and lifestyle issues. And guess what? A really big and important cultural difference is the availability of socialized medicine. Canadians are probably the most culturally similar group to Americans of any nation in the world, and we have a lifespan on average three years longer. We watch much the same TV, eat the same food, do the same jobs. The big difference is that we have socialized medicine.

Just so we're clear about how stupid what you said is, you might as well have said it was unfair to compare nations without normalizing their death rates, at which point everyone would be equal. That's how dumb your claim here was. It not only missed the point, it recommended a remedy that would defeat the purpose of the whole exercise. So I am willing to accept that you're truly stupid and don't understand the variables that affect death rates for a nation, or that you're a mendacious shill deliberately trying to obscure the issue. Either explanation fits. Mind telling us all which it is?
 
2012-12-03 02:17:35 PM

Sybarite: increasing rate of crime

The what now?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 518x469]


BUT BUT AMERICA'S DECLINING!!!
 
2012-12-03 02:25:19 PM
U.S. is now 51st in the world for life expectancy. It would be higher except for the increasing rate of crime, obesity, people imitating stunts on "Jackass" that all the countries at the top have single-payer health care.
 
2012-12-03 02:32:30 PM

meanmutton: Moopy Mac: Jim_Callahan: So... the US has basically the same life expectancy as everywhere else in the first world (around 80), and this is bad for America somehow?

Look, I'm all for single-payer health care, but bad argument is bad. Especially when it's extremely obvious you're spinning the data as hard as you can. I mean, really, you think we're going to buy that you just ran out of space on the web page and couldn't put the actual numbers for Japan, China, etc on there? We immediately know by omission that they're something like 80-82, and that you left them off because you knew that would rightfully impress basically no one.

A three year difference (with Canada) and 5.5 year difference (Japan) is pretty substantial.

Fun fact: the life expectancy of Japanese-Americans is 84.5 (per US Dept of HHS). The life expectancy of Japanese living in Japan is 82.9 (per Google).

Life expectancy has MUCH more to do with diet, exercise, and genetics than it does with first-world level medical care.


I'm not arguing about health care, just that 3-5 years is a lot of time.

And that 84.5 years number for Japanese-Americans I believe is just for women. In Japan it is 86 for women.
 
2012-12-03 02:38:57 PM
I think you missed this much more important story from that website.

Link
 
2012-12-03 02:54:41 PM

meanmutton: Moopy Mac: Jim_Callahan: So... the US has basically the same life expectancy as everywhere else in the first world (around 80), and this is bad for America somehow?

Look, I'm all for single-payer health care, but bad argument is bad. Especially when it's extremely obvious you're spinning the data as hard as you can. I mean, really, you think we're going to buy that you just ran out of space on the web page and couldn't put the actual numbers for Japan, China, etc on there? We immediately know by omission that they're something like 80-82, and that you left them off because you knew that would rightfully impress basically no one.

A three year difference (with Canada) and 5.5 year difference (Japan) is pretty substantial.

Fun fact: the life expectancy of Japanese-Americans is 84.5 (per US Dept of HHS). The life expectancy of Japanese living in Japan is 82.9 (per Google).

Life expectancy has MUCH more to do with diet, exercise, and genetics than it does with first-world level medical care.


Does that take into account the suicide statistic in Japan?

/7th in the world
 
2012-12-03 03:45:05 PM

dletter: Monaco has a wealthy population

I think you'll find a lot of correlation with this.

I'd be interested to see the U.S.'s life expectancy in the "Households above 50k" vs. "Households making below 50k" categories, or based on net worth splits. I guess it is probably hard to do that, but, I think the point is.... Life Expectancy has a lot to do with income, especially in a country that does not have society wide healthcare (which was the point of this article I suppose).

Of course, you'll also have the Lindsey Lohan's of the world bringing down the higher net worth bracket.


Although, given how close some of these numbers are, I think it'd make more sense that if your life expectancy is within a week of another country, it's the same. Really, 80.02 years versus 80.04 years? Isn't that beyond statistically insignificant?
 
2012-12-03 03:48:44 PM
Hey, hey...I found a fun life expectancy test: 82.1 years for me.
 
2012-12-03 03:51:38 PM

Mr. Eugenides: China, Venezuala and Cuba all have socialized medicine too. Where do they rank?


Right below the US embargo on the export of two thirds of the world's medicines and most of its really, really expensive medical technology
 
2012-12-03 03:53:06 PM
Puerto Rico ranks 44th compared to the Mainland at 51st. Those chupacapras have a really good health care plan. You might say it's out of this world.
 
2012-12-03 04:04:02 PM
but what if I don't want to live 93 years?
 
2012-12-03 04:08:11 PM

KiltedBastich: MyRandomName: Liberal statistics are always farking awful.

Normalize the countries by racial makeup and get back to me.

Also normalize it by obesity.

Taking a comparison between radically different population sets is beyond dumb.

The truly dumb idea here is yours. The numbers you want to normalize are in fact a large component of the independent variable being analyzed in the first place. No one has ever shown any significant difference in lifespan according to race that is not adequately explained by cultural differences like diet and lifestyle. And obesity is one of those diet and lifestyle issues. And guess what? A really big and important cultural difference is the availability of socialized medicine. Canadians are probably the most culturally similar group to Americans of any nation in the world, and we have a lifespan on average three years longer. We watch much the same TV, eat the same food, do the same jobs. The big difference is that we have socialized medicine.

Just so we're clear about how stupid what you said is, you might as well have said it was unfair to compare nations without normalizing their death rates, at which point everyone would be equal. That's how dumb your claim here was. It not only missed the point, it recommended a remedy that would defeat the purpose of the whole exercise. So I am willing to accept that you're truly stupid and don't understand the variables that affect death rates for a nation, or that you're a mendacious shill deliberately trying to obscure the issue. Either explanation fits. Mind telling us all which it is?


Really? Are you REALLY trying to compare the SW of the USA to Quebec? That's funny ;-)
 
Displayed 50 of 87 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report