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(Medical Xpress)   Asperger's dropped from revised diagnosis manual... SO STOP LOOKING AT ME LIKE THAT, GEEZ   (medicalxpress.com) divider line 13
    More: PSA, Asperger's, diagnostic, mental disorders, gender dysphoria, spectrum disorders, dyslexic, psychiatric medication, Battle Creek  
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3860 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Dec 2012 at 4:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-02 05:59:58 PM
3 votes:

albuquerquehalsey: Methadone Girls: ecmoRandomNumbers: And some Asperger's families opposed any change, fearing their kids would lose a diagnosis and no longer be eligible for special services exempted from any type of accountability or responsibility.

awwwwwww...bless your heart. You don't know what you're talking about but you keep trying.

Someone pass this guy an autistic kid to take care of for a month so he can find out for himself...anyone?

I have been meet people with mild and severe autism, and I think I understand, at least to a very small extent, the difficulties caregiver go through. However, the reason people (myself included) make comments like ecmoRandomNumbers did is because of the phenomenon of self-diagnosed ass-burgers:

http://www.cracked.com/blog/6-real-diseases-that-have-somehow-become-t rendy/



The "Disease of the Week" phenomenon has two sides. Some people find out about something they've been enduring for a lifetime without knowing why they're in pain/can't concentrate/can't understand the myriad unspoken rules of social interaction. Unfortunately, it seems like far more people find an excuse for malingering/scoring legal PEDs/acting like an asshole.
2012-12-02 04:00:04 PM
3 votes:

ecmoRandomNumbers: And some Asperger's families opposed any change, fearing their kids would lose a diagnosis and no longer be eligible for special services exempted from any type of accountability or responsibility.


awwwwwww...bless your heart. You don't know what you're talking about but you keep trying.

Someone pass this guy an autistic kid to take care of for a month so he can find out for himself...anyone?
2012-12-02 03:13:51 PM
2 votes:
And some Asperger's families opposed any change, fearing their kids would lose a diagnosis and no longer be eligible for special services exempted from any type of accountability or responsibility.
2012-12-02 02:51:21 PM
2 votes:
In other news, there's this:

FTFA: -Eliminating the term "gender identity disorder." It has been used for children or adults who strongly believe that they were born the wrong gender. But many activists believe the condition isn't a disorder and say calling it one is stigmatizing. The term would be replaced with "gender dysphoria," which means emotional distress over one's gender. Supporters equated the change with removing homosexuality as a mental illness in the diagnostic manual, which happened decades ago.

That's a huge thing for the transgender community. It means it's one step closer to treating transgenderism as a birth defect or medical condition, and not as a mental illness.
2012-12-03 07:24:52 AM
1 votes:

cman: Why do we have to rename everything every other year?


Because the government is run by Kender?
2012-12-02 11:59:23 PM
1 votes:

BronyMedic: That's a huge thing for the transgender community. It means it's one step closer to treating transgenderism as a birth defect or medical condition, and not as a mental illness.


Assuming that the only issue is gender (in contrast to the slew of intersexed conditions), how is it not a mental illness? The bigger issue here is not the stigmatization of gender identity disorders, but the continued stigmatization of mental disorders as something that's not a medical issue. How is this chemical/wiring disorder any different than the other chemical/wiring disorders covered my the DSM?
2012-12-02 11:36:15 PM
1 votes:

BronyMedic: To be fair, Aspergers' Syndrome is used by a lot of Internet Doctors to diagnose themselves so they can have an excuse to continue to act like complete asses to everyone.


True, but it's also used the opposite way: by people who can't think of any reason you wouldn't like them or be fascinated by every little thing you say... unless of course you have some kind of mental disorder.

Yeah, thanks, you figured me out, friend-of-my-wife-who-I-met-twenty-minutes-ago. I especially appreciate the way you blurted it out in a large group of our mutual friends at a party, and took the fact that I wasn't amused as further evidence that I just don't understand how normal people like you see things.

Still more thanks for following up with my wife with that valuable tip: that she could just take an online quiz as though she were me and that would confirm your diagnosis once and for all.

Am I doing this "sarcasm" thing right? Your human speech patterns and rhetorical devices are so difficult for me, since as an Aspie I am (to hear you tell it) somewhere between a pocket calculator and a sociopath in terms of my mental development. For instance, if I want to sarcastically suggest that your master's degree in art does not really qualify you to diagnose me, I should say that I think it does, right? Likewise, if you're basing your diagnosis on things you observed in your one boyfriend who you're pretty sure also had Asperger's--you know, the one who gravitated to that most traditional of Aspie careers, elementary school teacher--and I want to suggest that I think you're full of shiat, I should just nod my head and say, "sounds legit." Right?

/I never said I didn't have rage issues
2012-12-02 11:07:59 PM
1 votes:

Methadone Girls: milsorgen: And are you going to be there when the time comes to shove your little snowflake out the door to unload him on the public school or community college systems so that those of us who are paying attention to (or paying for) our classes (they are teachers not babysitters you see) won't have to deal with outbursts and disruptions.

my autistic snowflake is 14. He's made it through so far. He might even be able to work one day if I can find an employer that would take him and a helper to do whatever. He won't ever go to college. I don't have that hope for him.

As for my son disrupting your life for a short period of time each day you go to class. Man the fark up. I'll bet the "normal" smart ass kid disrupts your class even more than the autistic kids, but that's okay with you because you get to laugh at the smart ass's jokes. The autistic kids are shuffled out of the classroom when they're having an outburst as quick as the teachers aide can move them. Try to have some compassion for their situation. You might even grow as a human being.


Off your child will never be able to function in society without a massive amount of supervision and assistance, you eventually need to admit, at least to yourself, that you don't have a child: you have a hobby. One that you hold on to because it makes you feel special and you get off on the martyrdom. But don't kid yourself for a minute that your child ifs anything but a burden on society.
2012-12-02 09:20:19 PM
1 votes:

cman: Why do we have to rename everything every other year?


Because people whose life problems stem from nothing but their own poor judgment and choices wish desperately to deny this fact: doing so is much easier and more convenient, not to mention less painful, than personal growth. And so they steal the names of legitimate problems in an attempt to excuse their own self-inflicted wounds.

In time, the people these terms were taken from -people whose problems truly are no fault of their own- become associated with the undesirables: the stigma intended for some very guilty people thus falls upon innocents. The term stops being useful to describe these unfortunates, and so a new one is needed. The old term becomes nothing but an insult, and eventually the undesirables try to take on the new term too, and so the cycle continues.

Such has become the case with, for example, Asperger's. There's a very real difference between someone with a legitimate and professionally-diagnosed case of this disorder -who have physiological problems preventing them from learning basic social skills- versus the sort of jerk who doesn't have these skills either, but was prevented by nothing but his own refusal to learn. But thanks to this latter group's co-opting of this term, the legitimate and serious problem has gotten a very bad reputation: one that, frankly, it doesn't deserve. And so there needs to be a new name, not to make the bad group feel better, but to distinguish the good group from it. Eventually the bad group will co-opt this new term too, but it will help for a time.

And in the meantime, Asperger's, and the terms derived from it, will join the ranks of "moron," "idiot," and "retarded": once-legitimate medical terms, now obsolete and used only as insults.
2012-12-02 07:04:50 PM
1 votes:

milsorgen: And are you going to be there when the time comes to shove your little snowflake out the door to unload him on the public school or community college systems so that those of us who are paying attention to (or paying for) our classes (they are teachers not babysitters you see) won't have to deal with outbursts and disruptions.


my autistic snowflake is 14. He's made it through so far. He might even be able to work one day if I can find an employer that would take him and a helper to do whatever. He won't ever go to college. I don't have that hope for him.

As for my son disrupting your life for a short period of time each day you go to class. Man the fark up. I'll bet the "normal" smart ass kid disrupts your class even more than the autistic kids, but that's okay with you because you get to laugh at the smart ass's jokes. The autistic kids are shuffled out of the classroom when they're having an outburst as quick as the teachers aide can move them. Try to have some compassion for their situation. You might even grow as a human being.
2012-12-02 05:40:04 PM
1 votes:

wildcardjack: I think the term autism is too broad to really define any one problem. Calling something "a spectrum disorder" is just a cop-out.



You're absolutely right, but it's not a cop-out, it's an acknowledgment. There are already multiple discrete known pathologies under the ASD label, from Rett syndrome to fragile X. An ASD diagnosis is a description of behavior, not neuroanatomy or biochemistry.
2012-12-02 04:54:01 PM
1 votes:
I think the term autism is too broad to really define any one problem. Calling something "a spectrum disorder" is just a cop-out.
2012-12-02 04:03:06 PM
1 votes:

Methadone Girls: ecmoRandomNumbers: And some Asperger's families opposed any change, fearing their kids would lose a diagnosis and no longer be eligible for special services exempted from any type of accountability or responsibility.

awwwwwww...bless your heart. You don't know what you're talking about but you keep trying.

Someone pass this guy an autistic kid to take care of for a month so he can find out for himself...anyone?


To be fair, Aspergers' Syndrome is used by a lot of Internet Doctors to diagnose themselves so they can have an excuse to continue to act like complete asses to everyone.
 
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