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(Slate)   We have come to a point in our evolution as a society where the question "Is handwriting worth saving?" must be asked   (slate.com) divider line 165
    More: Sad, to-do list, countertops, society, evolution  
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4905 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Dec 2012 at 4:38 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-02 09:47:14 PM

lordargent: I can't read this worth a damn.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/Spencerian_exampl e. jpg


That′s either a font or the most perfect calligraphy I′ve ever seen. It′s not even like modern OpenType Pro fonts that can have the letters change shape automatically (and even better with manual control) in modern OpenType-aware applications (like the SimpleText editor that comes with Mac OS X since the early days of OS X).

This company can make your own cursive or manuscript handwriting into an OpenType Pro font for you. They also have handwriting fonts (complete with OpenType Pro contextual alternates) in the styles of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Timothy Matlack (the Declaration of Independence scribe), etc.
 
2012-12-03 02:33:34 AM
Cursive is much easier to use when you're writing on a chalkboard. I use it almost exclusively when I teach.

Any kid who can't read it probably shouldn't be in college.
 
2012-12-03 02:20:43 PM

IamAwake: The One True TheDavid:

Typing is to writing what mobility scooters are to legs.

Typing (and the mass-printing, easily available information which actually in question here...) is why we have democracies, some modicum of liberty, etc.


[citation needed]


Writing by hand is great if you have an audience of 1.

Yes, and...?


Mobility scooters just allow people to be lazy, or are something to fall back on after they give themselves serious health issues after a lifetime of poor health decisions (99% of the time, at least...).


Yes.


The internet allows me to have conversations with people across the world, across the socio-political spectrums.


Yes. It's a good thing.


One would have to have an extremely limited perspective to think your analogy has any merit.


I'm sorry, what did that Straw Man do to you? Or did the voices in your head get you al confused?

My point is we should continue to teach & practice writing by hand, and in cursive at that, in case, oh, in case we undergo an EMP attack by those Chinese devils that would disrupt not only our electronic communications but also the electric transmission that runs the machines that push emails "through the tubes."

Or do you know of any plans to set up a pedal-powered Internet anytime soon? If so it would have to be UUCP anyway, which is too primitive a setup to drive all this bandwidth; think about it and you'll see I'm right. "I'm pedalling as fast as I can Skipper but the old alkie in Guam must be snoozing again."

Besides my Grandma's handwriting was gorgeous.
 
2012-12-03 02:22:13 PM
PlatinumDragon:

The nice thing about handwriting on paper is that it doesn't require electricity to access the stored information.

Bingo.
 
2012-12-03 02:25:54 PM

lordargent: mmagdalene: if we stop teaching handwriting, we risk the scared texts and primary sources of the past becoming indecipherable to all but a few learned scribes within a generation or two.

You can just look up "Cursive" on wikipedia :P


"Cursive" on Wikipedia. (link)
 
2012-12-03 02:34:14 PM
lordargent:

mmagdalene: if we stop teaching handwriting, we risk the scared texts and primary sources of the past becoming indecipherable to all but a few learned scribes within a generation or two.

You can just look up "Cursive" on wikipedia :P

All kidding aside, if you don't want knowledge of a topic to fade, then it needs to be properly documented in a digital form.

Once it's documented in digital, it really becomes immortal and can survive even the death of its experts. You can make as many perfect copies as you have machines and drive space to distribute it to.

I can't read this worth a damn.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/Spencerian_example . jpg


"Dear Sir: We take pleasure in sending you by this mail, College Jour containing terms of tuition board, and full information concerning this school." Etc. Not the best punctated example I've seen, and I'm not sure what a Jour is, but anyway.


But I can read the Declaration of Independence
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/07/Us_declaration_ind e pendence.jpg


Ah yes. All that afsembling in congrefs.
 
2012-12-03 02:38:10 PM
MuonNeutrino:

The fact that some of the 'best students' have terrible handwriting ought to be a clue - namely, that handwriting has absolutely nothing to do with academic aptitude.

Given continued electricity.
 
2012-12-03 02:41:35 PM

jimmythrust: MuonNeutrino:

The fact that some of the 'best students' have terrible handwriting ought to be a clue - namely, that handwriting has absolutely nothing to do with academic aptitude.

If there is no link, then why do all the inept have horrible handwriting? I have no flunkers with beautiful penmanship. The sharp ones with bad handwriting area likely just in a hurry to convey their ideas, whereas the dullards can barely write out the letters of the alphabet. Just sayin'.


Actually I've seen some very stupid and misspelled missives written in beautiful cursive. Usually by teenage girls who dot an i with a little circle. So you're both wrong. PPPPP!!1!!
 
2012-12-03 02:48:34 PM
Duck_of_Doom:

Or, there may be something to the folk idea that writing by hand engages different parts of your brain, ones involved with memory.

My hunch it's taking care to write legibly that does it. It seems to shove it up in there for keeps.

And with reading I've noticed that sounding words out in my head makes them harder to forget.

But then I'll admit to being brain damaged, so...
 
2012-12-03 02:50:49 PM
jpo2269:

The death of civilization will begin the day we stop stressing the need for people to write by hand.

The death of civilization already started with the proliferation of TV, but thanks for trying.
 
2012-12-03 02:54:24 PM
phartman:

Writing is essential. Good penmanship is commendable.

Poor grammar is rampant. I am often amazed at people's lack of ability to write a comprehensible sentance
sentence. FTFY!
 
2012-12-03 02:57:59 PM
Yay! I win another thread!
 
2012-12-03 08:58:45 PM

The One True TheDavid: PlatinumDragon:

The nice thing about handwriting on paper is that it doesn't require electricity to access the stored information.

Bingo.


i296.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-03 11:08:26 PM

The One True TheDavid: PlatinumDragon:

The nice thing about handwriting on paper is that it doesn't require electricity to access the stored information.

Bingo.


The nice thing about chiseling letters into clay tablets is you don't need access to manufactured paper, ink, and pens.
 
2012-12-04 10:30:45 AM

aerojockey: The One True TheDavid: PlatinumDragon:

The nice thing about handwriting on paper is that it doesn't require electricity to access the stored information.

Bingo.

The nice thing about chiseling letters into clay tablets is you don't need access to manufactured paper, ink, and pens.


Don't laugh so hard; I've actually wondered if this is a not-kooky way to preserve really important fundamental physical information in the event of a complete technological collapse - say, fundamental constants, the basic structure of matter and energy, what Earth is and where it is, etc. Chisel tablets, bury/store copies in randomly-selected locations. For most other things, paper should work fine (properly preserved, of course - even the ancient Egyptians made fiber-based media, so it may not be easy, but it's certainly not impossible).

My point being, always have a fallback option in case one whiz-bang technology is suddenly no longer supportable... or even producable.
 
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