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(Slate)   We have come to a point in our evolution as a society where the question "Is handwriting worth saving?" must be asked   (slate.com) divider line 165
    More: Sad, to-do list, countertops, society, evolution  
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4901 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Dec 2012 at 4:38 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-01 07:01:12 PM
In high school and college architecture courses, we used to fill out reams of index cards learning to print in the "architectural style". After that I basically forgot how to write in cursive. I can still do it but I have to concentrate very hard and still fall into printing the occasional letter. However, cursive writing is still a useful thing to know and used every day by all manner of professions.
 
2012-12-01 07:01:42 PM

Indubitably: Duh.


*whistles while walking away*
 
2012-12-01 07:03:29 PM

MayoBoy: AbbeySomeone: Absolutely beautiful. Email me please.
/eip



I think I got your email right. My son has had Whooping Cough and I've slept through the night exactly 3 times since Halloween (last night I got 4 hours of sleep). My mind isn't firing on all cylinders and it actually took some extreme effort on my part to translate your email. If you don't get it, leave another post here and I'll try again after I've had a nap.


Yep. Got it.
 
2012-12-01 07:12:17 PM
My friend, a tradesman by training makes. He does some awesome work but none of it could be called pretty. Each year he sends out holiday cards. In them he writes what has gone on in his life in that year. Everyone gets their own letter.
I wear a size 13 ring and his fingers dwarf mine. The writing in his letters are so beautiful it's a delight to see. In these letters his personality and his artfulness is allowed to shine through.

If there is no more cursive then people like him will no longer be afforded the opportunity to express that beauty from inside.

Damn shame.
 
2012-12-01 07:13:33 PM
The nice thing about handwriting on paper is that it doesn't require electricity to access the stored information.
 
2012-12-01 07:17:12 PM

BMFPitt: picturescrazy: Handwriting is work saving. Cursive is not.

This.


I would like to see proper Calligraphy come back in style.

/my lawn ... OFF
 
2012-12-01 07:23:32 PM
I don't know why I can't leave this poor dead horse alone, but here's my two cents, as a former librarian and teacher who had a Palmer method handwriting class in grade school, and was forced to learn a second style as part of my teaching preparation:

Yes, it sucks. Very few people have the patience and attention to detail to make it an enjoyable task. There are people with dysgraphia or fine motor skill impairments who find it even more difficult. My own penmanship is still awful, but I can probably read yours. However, if we stop teaching handwriting, we risk the scared texts and primary sources of the past becoming indecipherable to all but a few learned scribes within a generation or two. Illiteracy is possibly the best non-violent method of centralizing wealth and power while exerting profound control over the masses, and has been used as such to great effect in the past. 

That is not a risk we should accept.
 
2012-12-01 07:23:58 PM

pisceandreamer: I will be writing by hand until I can't write anymore. Whether I'm doing a paper for school or some attempt at something creative, I can't just type it straight into the laptop.

Also, I can always keep a little notebook & pen in my purse to write things, whereas I don't often take my laptop or iPad with me when I am just out and about.

Not sure why, because we had computers in the house from junior high on up, but it is just completely ingrained in me to write things out by hand first and then transcribe them to the computer.


Oh wow, I didn't think there were people like me in that regard around here.
 
2012-12-01 07:35:42 PM

Phil Moskowitz: Just get one of these itty bitty thermal Printers if you want to make notes and whatnot.


Thermal print wipes off... they knew that when these came out:

www.heimcomputer.de

not to mention they need special paper coated to accept thermal transfer
 
2012-12-01 07:37:24 PM

Marcintosh: My friend, a tradesman by training makes. He does some awesome work but none of it could be called pretty. Each year he sends out holiday cards. In them he writes what has gone on in his life in that year. Everyone gets their own letter.
I wear a size 13 ring and his fingers dwarf mine. The writing in his letters are so beautiful it's a delight to see. In these letters his personality and his artfulness is allowed to shine through.

If there is no more cursive then people like him will no longer be afforded the opportunity to express that beauty from inside.

Damn shame.


He can still express himself regardless of the 'rules'.
 
2012-12-01 07:41:35 PM

hillbillypharmacist: No, it's not worth saving.


Agreed. A few years ago I abandoned it as mine had gotten too hard to read and I found myself actually going slower than with printing. The thing is I write so little that I simply don't keep in practice. Virtually everything is on the computer these days.

pisceandreamer: I will be writing by hand until I can't write anymore. Whether I'm doing a paper for school or some attempt at something creative, I can't just type it straight into the laptop.


Why not? It's easier to edit what you do on the computer than what you do on paper. I only use paper if I have no computer available, I need to deal with it away from the computer and I have no printer (while I carry a laptop I don't carry a printer for it) or it's not text in the first place. (Occasionally I find myself working out math on a piece of paper.)

Not sure why, because we had computers in the house from junior high on up, but it is just completely ingrained in me to write things out by hand first and then transcribe them to the computer.

It's a matter of how much we adapt. The idea of writing it out longhand would feel totally unnatural to me these days.

Soymilk: Didn't someone claim that's it's not worth teaching kids to do math in their heads or with a pencil and paper, since now everyone has calculators?

How did that work out?


That's a different matter. I don't think anyone on here is saying there should be no printing. It's just cursive that has reached the point of not being worth it anymore.

Thorak: Cursive is an abomination that only existed for two reasons;
1> Old-style ink pens which might blot if lifted from the page and placed back down, and
2> Forcing southpaws to write right-handed because left-handedness was seen as "wrong".


With practice you can do cursive faster than printing.

clowncar on fire: You all act like the internet and electrical gadgetry will be immune in the event of: long term disruption to the power grid ore lectromagnetic pulse gerated either by natural circumstances, or as a weapon of war by a foreign government should the US ever be attacked. You really don't want to put all your reliance in the few remaining who would be able to transcribe information accurately.


I wouldn't expect to survive in this case anyway.

Gyrfalcon: There will always be a need for writing with some kind of pen or pencil or stick or whatever. Whether it's "cursive" or not is probably irrelevant. The number of people who cannot TYPE, in this day and age, is somewhat shocking, however. Embroiled as I am in a job hunt, I'm amazed that a typing speed of only 45 wpm is still standard for secretarial positions.

If we're going to phase out writing after first or second grade; then typing better be mandatory. And basic grammar and composition still needs to be taught. The stuff that's being passed off as "english" nowadays is beyond disgraceful.


Yeah. I've had multiple people amazed at my typing speed--and it's only about 80wpm and only that on simple stuff.
 
2012-12-01 07:42:57 PM
mmagdalene: if we stop teaching handwriting, we risk the scared texts and primary sources of the past becoming indecipherable to all but a few learned scribes within a generation or two.

You can just look up "Cursive" on wikipedia :P

All kidding aside, if you don't want knowledge of a topic to fade, then it needs to be properly documented in a digital form.

Once it's documented in digital, it really becomes immortal and can survive even the death of its experts. You can make as many perfect copies as you have machines and drive space to distribute it to.

I can't read this worth a damn.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/Spencerian_exampl e. jpg

But I can read the Declaration of Independence
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/07/Us_declaration_in de pendence.jpg
 
2012-12-01 07:45:47 PM
To write legibly
 
2012-12-01 07:48:13 PM
Yeah, let's get rid of that pesky cursive writing, that's another hurtle we can eliminate for the kids.
A proper education isn't really needed anymore, hey we are only number seven in the world as far as graduation, so why the bother?
We don't need no education, we don't need no thought control

newshour.s3.amazonaws.com
 
2012-12-01 07:49:52 PM
I'm always too drunk anyways
 
2012-12-01 07:50:35 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-01 07:51:10 PM
No, Subby, the question does not need to be asked, for the same reason paper-and-ink books aren't going out of print. Electricity is not perfect.

/DNRTFA
//Can still guess what it says
///Academics whine about this so farkin' much, it's annoying as all get-out.
 
2012-12-01 07:51:15 PM
I taught myself to read cursive in elementary school without any help. It is not farking Chinese. If you can't figure it out for yourself you probably shouldn't be trying to interpret sacred texts and primary sources of the past.
 
2012-12-01 07:56:26 PM
Having just made my high school students write, by hand, hour long essays right before their Thanksgiving break, I'm getting a kick out of this thread.

Some of my best students have terrible handwriting. Some can't do cursive. Some communicate a little better by typing. However, not a single one of my mouth breathers has decent handwriting, whether cursive or print. I do not blame the internetz or tablets or cellular telephones for this. I blame the farking parents. Teach your farking snowflake to communicate a complex thought, or better yet--if you recognize that you're an idiot, maybe don't have kids and don't pass down the stupid?

/lawn
//onion, belt
///five bees for a quarter
 
2012-12-01 08:05:15 PM
Block printing obviously needs to stay around. Cursive is useless, mostly; while theoretically with practice one can make it faster than printing, many of the ligatures and curlicues are forced.

I personally use a hybrid that looks more like D'Nealian than anything else. But it is necessary to teach cursive? No.
 
2012-12-01 08:06:26 PM

jimmythrust: Having just made my high school students write, by hand, hour long essays right before their Thanksgiving break, I'm getting a kick out of this thread.

Some of my best students have terrible handwriting. Some can't do cursive. Some communicate a little better by typing. However, not a single one of my mouth breathers has decent handwriting, whether cursive or print. I do not blame the internetz or tablets or cellular telephones for this. I blame the farking parents. Teach your farking snowflake to communicate a complex thought, or better yet--if you recognize that you're an idiot, maybe don't have kids and don't pass down the stupid?


Or maybe you could recognize that communicating a complex thought has absolutely nothing to do with handwriting? The words are the same, whether they're presented as pixels on a screen, dots on a printed page, or ink from a pen. The fact that some of the 'best students' have terrible handwriting ought to be a clue - namely, that handwriting has absolutely nothing to do with academic aptitude.
 
2012-12-01 08:09:29 PM

IamAwake: I can't recall the actual dates/figures, but one of the biggie tech people (one of the google folks, I think?) figured out there has been more information generated in the last 10 years (at that time, at least) than in the whole of human history prior to that 10 years.

Anything important on that CD is elsewhere. It's digital/ephemeral; it isn't tied to a particular physical object. Will that particular CD still be around? Probably not...but any data on it that is important will still be somewhere.


Curious, that. Do you mean printed information, or all information? Keep in mind that we have a literate society with cheap recording ability available. If printed/saved, then I'd say I alone have produced more information in 36 years than the Celts have in any 100 pre-Christian years. Fark itself probably holds more information than pre-Columbus Americas' entire human history. Those were oral-based societies, so much has been lost to time, adulterated by conquerors, and ultimately forgotten. Not to mention what was written may have been burned, flooded, or wrecked by the curious. Maybe we don't have Snorri Sturluson's shopping list or his angsty teenage poetry, but we do have something small he recorded for posterity.

We have more information of the "kk l8r" and LOLCat variety, surely. I'd still give your left nut for a full, unedited collection of Etruscan myths, or an ancient Phoenician's travel blog.

As for ephemeral data - just think about the word you chose. Ephemeral. Not sure you meant to use that word, but that doesn't bode well for it being around in 500 years. :-) And data can be edited, tampered with, lost, erased, or DRMed. CSS: at my job, 10 years ago my boss told me to edit the by-laws of the organization to reflect something. This was a major no-no (it wasn't something to be done in secret by one person, it was a founding statement about the organization that should have gone before the entire organization for approval). After it was done, I changed it back and saved as an alternate, as I had guilt and CYA in full effect. Now which one is the legit copy, the one with the change or the original? Both are digital, and but for one sentence they're identical, yet that one sentence changes the direction of the organization.

/ok, you can keep your left nut. Can I still have the Phoenician's travel blog?
 
2012-12-01 08:10:26 PM
zs1.smbc-comics.com
 
2012-12-01 08:13:14 PM

MuonNeutrino: jimmythrust: Having just made my high school students write, by hand, hour long essays right before their Thanksgiving break, I'm getting a kick out of this thread.

Some of my best students have terrible handwriting. Some can't do cursive. Some communicate a little better by typing. However, not a single one of my mouth breathers has decent handwriting, whether cursive or print. I do not blame the internetz or tablets or cellular telephones for this. I blame the farking parents. Teach your farking snowflake to communicate a complex thought, or better yet--if you recognize that you're an idiot, maybe don't have kids and don't pass down the stupid?

Or maybe you could recognize that communicating a complex thought has absolutely nothing to do with handwriting? The words are the same, whether they're presented as pixels on a screen, dots on a printed page, or ink from a pen. The fact that some of the 'best students' have terrible handwriting ought to be a clue - namely, that handwriting has absolutely nothing to do with academic aptitude.


If there is no link, then why do all the inept have horrible handwriting? I have no flunkers with beautiful penmanship. The sharp ones with bad handwriting area likely just in a hurry to convey their ideas, whereas the dullards can barely write out the letters of the alphabet. Just sayin'.
 
2012-12-01 08:21:37 PM
I will say that in college, one of my friends had the most beautiful handwriting I have ever seen as it was produced. No fancy curlicues or anything, but each letter was perfectly formed -- you could read it from across the room. And she wrote fast. I was always jealous.

Still, it's a skill not much used by a majority of people nowadays. Might as well make students write with a fountain pen.
 
2012-12-01 08:23:48 PM

jimmythrust: If there is no link, then why do all the inept have horrible handwriting? I have no flunkers with beautiful penmanship. The sharp ones with bad handwriting area likely just in a hurry to convey their ideas, whereas the dullards can barely write out the letters of the alphabet. Just sayin'.


Maybe the beautiful penmanship ones are the students driven to do everything well, even something as arcane as writing. The dullards are dullards all around, and don't care even about literacy.

Or, there may be something to the folk idea that writing by hand engages different parts of your brain, ones involved with memory.
 
2012-12-01 08:31:19 PM
Having a good, readable script as your disposal prevents you from looking like a subliterate moron in settings where you need to write something down for a group to see on the spot (meetings, explaining things to a team, etc)

Bad handwriting is magnified 1000-fold on a whiteboard, too.
 
2012-12-01 08:32:44 PM

Bonzo_1116: Having a good, readable script asAT your disposal prevents you from looking like a subliterate moron in settings where you need to write something down for a group to see on the spot (meetings, explaining things to a team, etc)

Bad handwriting is magnified 1000-fold on a whiteboard, too.


Damn, I can't tyer no good, neither.
 
2012-12-01 08:34:34 PM

Duck_of_Doom: jimmythrust: If there is no link, then why do all the inept have horrible handwriting? I have no flunkers with beautiful penmanship. The sharp ones with bad handwriting area likely just in a hurry to convey their ideas, whereas the dullards can barely write out the letters of the alphabet. Just sayin'.

Maybe the beautiful penmanship ones are the students driven to do everything well, even something as arcane as writing. The dullards are dullards all around, and don't care even about literacy.

Or, there may be something to the folk idea that writing by hand engages different parts of your brain, ones involved with memory.


I don't think that's a folk idea--that sounds more like science learnin'.

As for the dullards, they don't care in a big way around these parts. Farking snowflakes.
 
2012-12-01 08:36:38 PM

cig-mkr: Yeah, let's get rid of that pesky cursive writing, that's another hurtle we can eliminate for the kids.
A proper education isn't really needed anymore, hey we are only number seven in the world as far as graduation, so why the bother?
We don't need no education, we don't need no thought control

[newshour.s3.amazonaws.com image 397x579]


I don't know how things are in other countries, but I'd be skeptical of that 97% completion rate for Germany. In Germany if you go to the Hauptschule you're done after Grade 9, and if you go to Realschule you're done after Grade 10, and both of those count as "high school graduates" whereas here in the U.S. someone with less than 12 years of school is a "high school dropout." Only the Gymnasium, which prepares you for further study at a University, comprises 12-13 years of education in the same way that the American primary/middle/high school curriculum does. In recent years, as I understand it, there's been a push to have everyone below the Gymnasium level attend more years of schooling, to meet the demands of the modern workplace, but I'm not up on the news from Germany so I don't know to what extent things might have changed in recent years.

I know at a very minimum other countries don't have the sort of "one size fits all" academic program that the U.S. does. Not to hold them up as a model for us to emulate, because "tracking" students in the way that Germany and many other countries do presents problems of its own.
 
2012-12-01 08:38:40 PM
The death of civilization will begin the day we stop stressing the need for people to write by hand.
 
2012-12-01 09:01:54 PM
This is not sad, this is absolutely stupid to be concerned about. The only reason handwriting was ever useful was when we used fountain pens, because it made a mess when you left the page with the tip while writing. Today's kids aren't stupid for not knowing handwriting, the last 3 generations have just been too stupid to stop teaching handwriting after we stopped using fountain pens.

End rant.
 
2012-12-01 09:07:25 PM

geekbikerskum: cig-mkr: Yeah, let's get rid of that pesky cursive writing, that's another hurtle we can eliminate for the kids.
A proper education isn't really needed anymore, hey we are only number seven in the world as far as graduation, so why the bother?
We don't need no education, we don't need no thought control

[newshour.s3.amazonaws.com image 397x579]

I don't know how things are in other countries, but I'd be skeptical of that 97% completion rate for Germany. In Germany if you go to the Hauptschule you're done after Grade 9, and if you go to Realschule you're done after Grade 10, and both of those count as "high school graduates" whereas here in the U.S. someone with less than 12 years of school is a "high school dropout." Only the Gymnasium, which prepares you for further study at a University, comprises 12-13 years of education in the same way that the American primary/middle/high school curriculum does. In recent years, as I understand it, there's been a push to have everyone below the Gymnasium level attend more years of schooling, to meet the demands of the modern workplace, but I'm not up on the news from Germany so I don't know to what extent things might have changed in recent years.

I know at a very minimum other countries don't have the sort of "one size fits all" academic program that the U.S. does. Not to hold them up as a model for us to emulate, because "tracking" students in the way that Germany and many other countries do presents problems of its own.


I remember something years ago about the German education system where the students were tested at a certain age. Depending on the outcome they were assigned to go on for further education or a trade type school. This was thirty years ago, I'm sure things have changed.

I know at a very minimum other countries don't have the sort of "one size fits all" academic program that the U.S. does.

And I think the one size fits all won't work either. I think America probably has a student body that's too diverse for one size fits all.

Just remembered the commercial on television where the kid was on the track jumping lower hurdles.
 
2012-12-01 09:08:33 PM

Soymilk: Didn't someone claim that's it's not worth teaching kids to do math in their heads or with a pencil and paper, since now everyone has calculators?

How did that work out?


proud morons still make this argument.
 
2012-12-01 09:23:15 PM
To teach
 
2012-12-01 09:25:43 PM

cig-mkr: I remember something years ago about the German education system where the students were tested at a certain age. Depending on the outcome they were assigned to go on for further education or a trade type school. This was thirty years ago, I'm sure things have changed.


Yeah, it's the ultimate in high-stakes testing. Have a bad day that day, and you're screwed. Too bad also if you're the sort of student who gets off to a slow start but blossoms later, in the higher grades. That's the big disadvantage to that kind of system. It also discriminates heavily against students from socioeconomic strata who cannot afford specialized test-prep and the like.

For all the disparity in graduation rates, it wouldn't surprise me if the average American has *more* years of education than the average German, because "school" in the U.S. lasts 12 years for everybody, and there's also an emphasis on "college for all" in the U.S. that doesn't exist in Germany.
 
2012-12-01 09:33:13 PM

Duck_of_Doom: Curious, that. Do you mean printed information, or all information? Keep in mind that we have a literate society with cheap recording ability available.


Which is precisely why the phenomenon is occurring. It's a diluted use of the word "information" - I just spent half a second looking, and it was Eric Schmidt - his claim was actually that [information recording in all of human history prior to 2003] was less than [information recorded every two days now]
http://readwrite.com/2011/02/07/are-we-really-creating-as-much

As for ephemeral data - just think about the word you chose. Ephemeral. Not sure you meant to use that word

It was very intentional ;) I lost my primary content-generation device (a laptop) a few months ago, and lost zero important info because of it; I auto-sync to two different "cloud" drives continuously, so I just grabbed a new machine, and was back in action in barely more than the time it took to set up the OS. While my "if it was important" was, honestly, off - due to situations like yours - it's very easy to prevent such problems as well. Maybe I'm just saying that as an IA/"White Hat" consultant, but..eh. ;) 

Data is now not a sheet of crumbling paper with words on it that might not be legible, upon which one is tempted to use methods such as carbon-dating - it's a digital thing that moves to dozens, thousands, billions of locations, effortlessly, and survives for as long or short a life as those who participate in its existence deem it to be worthy.

Cursive is just not relevant anymore. One can write coherently, even while "typing," so it's not like the contrast should really be considered [cursive] versus [l33t speak on twitter/SMS texts/etc] - content isn't generated for an audience of 1 anymore. And thus ends my recap/summary/incoherent ending paragraph of this reply.
 
2012-12-01 09:41:00 PM

Ed Finnerty: whatshisname: The ability to express yourself with pen and paper is invaluable - whether you're jotting a quick sketch, a map or some text.

Agreed.
Dick Butt


Exactly my point! That 30 second doodle is miles ahead of a tweet or this line of characters.
 
2012-12-01 11:49:38 PM
Writing is essential. Good penmanship is commendable.

Poor grammar is rampant. I am often amazed at people's lack of ability to write a comprehensible sentance.
 
2012-12-02 12:45:33 AM

phartman: Writing is essential. Good penmanship is commendable.

Poor grammar is rampant. I am often amazed at people's lack of ability to write a comprehensible sentance.


Sentance?
 
2012-12-02 01:02:06 AM
I'm a musician, and mindful of the related "is it worth still writing music by hand onto a five-line staff, or should we just do it all in the computer?" mindset.

Trust me, young music-conservatory students who have no handwriting skills also draw music notation about as well as they would have in elementary school, sad to say.

In Hollywood, there film scores (hand-)written 80 years ago (Korngold, Newman, Steiner) that look darned good on the score page even today. And then there are laser-printed scores only a couple decades old, where the dots are falling off the page. Oh, and don't get me started on the world of outdated/orphaned music software, etc.

/sorry for the interruption. As to TFA: yes, save handwriting, but let cursive go. The author writes as though paid by the word--seems to be a disease over at Slate.
 
2012-12-02 02:13:24 AM
I suppose perhaps being an Artist makes me see things a bit differently, but handwriting is just another way I express myself, I try to make it as beautiful as I can. I've stated before that I enjoy the actual physical act of writing and will continue to write in cursive on beautiful paper and in lovely journals. I love to write on paper and see ideas, thoughts and speculations build beneath my hand, my words, my heart, bare and vulnerable.

I type passably though not quickly. There were two groups in my typing class, the "Fast" and the "Accurate" I was in the "Accurate" group. The Instructor spent half of every class trying to get the "Accurate" to become faster and the other half trying to get the "Fast" to be more accurate. The goal being to be as fast and accurate as possible. I type between 40 to 50 wpm, never could get any speed. I'm much slower on a straight keyboard than an 'Ergonomic' one as I learned to type on an ergonomic keyboard and a straight one is awkward for me.

All those that truly dislike handwriting go ahead and stop doing it, I will be keeping it alive. Even if only for myself.
 
2012-12-02 02:19:19 AM

Lsherm: We can shiatcan handwriting as long as students are still obligated to learn how to write properly. Have any of you read an email or anything else from the current generation of college graduates? Twitter is destroying their ability to commit a coherent thought in writing. I sent an email to one of our Jr. Admins last week asking about the status of some tasks he had on a project and I got this in response: "Will l8tr." Then he got snippy with me when I demanded a more detailed update.

This guy isn't stupid, but his communication skills are absolutely atrocious.


Maybe he was too busy doing his job to write a long winded email. I noticed this trend at my last real job. The older guys spent hours every day writing pointless emails about what they were going to do and all these pointless status updates. Then they would biatch loudly about not having enough time to finish anything. They also liked to throw pointless meetings. Meanwhile the young guys would send one email that said "fixn trgr 4 email" and it would get done by the end of the day.
 
2012-12-02 03:12:15 AM
I'm going backwards and use calligraphy and hand-cut quills and India ink when writing checks to pay my bills.
 
2012-12-02 03:39:13 AM

Lusiphur: Lsherm: We can shiatcan handwriting as long as students are still obligated to learn how to write properly. Have any of you read an email or anything else from the current generation of college graduates? Twitter is destroying their ability to commit a coherent thought in writing. I sent an email to one of our Jr. Admins last week asking about the status of some tasks he had on a project and I got this in response: "Will l8tr." Then he got snippy with me when I demanded a more detailed update.

This guy isn't stupid, but his communication skills are absolutely atrocious.

Maybe he was too busy doing his job to write a long winded email. I noticed this trend at my last real job. The older guys spent hours every day writing pointless emails about what they were going to do and all these pointless status updates. Then they would biatch loudly about not having enough time to finish anything. They also liked to throw pointless meetings. Meanwhile the young guys would send one email that said "fixn trgr 4 email" and it would get done by the end of the day.


I'm sure that's what he thought, but I'm the seven proxies. It wasn't acceptable because we needed an actual update, not a shorthand.
 
2012-12-02 05:33:10 AM

Lsherm: I'm the seven proxies


I can get behind that.
 
2012-12-02 07:55:40 AM

dready zim: Lsherm: I'm the seven proxies

I can get behind that.


The Seventh Proxy would be a good name for a movie.
 
2012-12-02 10:43:24 AM
Cursive will always be around when my father talks about and during traffic.
 
2012-12-02 03:09:00 PM
"Handwriting," yes.

Cursive, no.

I use basic block style handwriting. If you can read a text, you can read block style.
 
2012-12-02 04:52:38 PM
I almost always print in block letters, but I have started to write in cursive again. Surprisingly it was technology that made me change back. I switched from keeping a paper binder that I kept my notes in for work, and now I write on a tablet with a scribe. It is MUCH easier to keep the pen on the screen and write in cursive than it is to constantly lift the scribe and print.

Give it a few years for tablets to lock down handwriting recognition and cursive should be able to be translated to text much easier. As interfaces evolve I predict that keyboarding will become much less of an essential skill and handwriting will become more important again. Either that or voice to text, but given that handwriting is more private and easier to correct, and that voice recognition has to overcome background noise, I don't think handwriting will go away.
 
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