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(Daily Mail)   Doctors warn that too much exercise can wear out your heart. Phew, dodged a bullet there   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 17
    More: Interesting, British Heart Foundation, James O'Keefe, Mesoamerican Long Count calendar, exercises  
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6557 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Dec 2012 at 12:33 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-01 01:02:33 AM  
4 votes:
Now if somebody would please green an article espousing the health benefits of Scotch, I will have lead a perfect day.
2012-12-01 02:05:48 AM  
3 votes:

BronyMedic: BigLuca: drtfa, but my interesting factoid for the day ... Every species on Earth has roughly (very roughly) the same number of heartbeats in their lifetime -- 1 billion. Link Link

So the average hummingbird has the same number of heart beats in its life as the blue whale. Kinda cool

At an average heart rate of 70, and assuming no variability (your vagus nerve has been severed, and you're taking beta blockers), 1 billion beats is a little under 3 years of contractions.


You fail at math. It's more like 30 years.

365*24*60*60= 3M and change. So one beat per second for 30 years gives us 9.5 hundred million beats. Even tacking on an extra ten per minute, average doesn't really change it all that much.

Not to mention that the 1 billion beats thing is an approximation based on lifespan in the wild. If you take animals into the confines of safety and treat them like humans, with no real threats and good medicine, they also exceed the billion beats. It's a lot easier to sleep well and eat properly when there's no food shortages and nothing's trying to eat you at night.
2012-12-01 01:01:16 AM  
3 votes:
I'm not surprised. Moderation is almost always better than any extreme.
2012-11-30 11:27:29 PM  
3 votes:
In fact, I am not heading to the gym in 26 minutes!
2012-12-01 12:46:41 AM  
2 votes:

mc_madness: Snapper Carr: [img35.imageshack.us image 246x520]


You're about 30 years too late on that.

Jim Fixx's "Art of Running" is a classic book.

/His family had a history of heart disease.


It is almost like multiple variables affect health...
2012-11-30 11:42:08 PM  
2 votes:
I can't help but to indulge in a bit of schadenfreude when I think about the fact that one of the major proponents of running for health died while doing it
2012-12-01 11:15:44 AM  
1 votes:
I'm M 55, 6'5", 205 lbs and go to the gym 5x/week. I do chest, core, arm and leg weight routines 4x/wk and run 30 mins at a moderate pace 4x/wk. My resting heart rate is 50bpm and I can jack it up to around 155bpm during my runs. I've found the key to fitness is habituation -- not how long I exercise or intensity, but just sticking to a schedule. Some days I push myself, other days I take it easier. Good diet and sleep are givens, but success for me at the gym has always been about consistency. I suspect this would be true for most people. Doing something is always better than doing nothing when it comes to maintaining good health.
2012-12-01 08:23:45 AM  
1 votes:

letrole: Weight lifting is anaerobic exercise, but still builds muscle mass that is capable of consuming large amounts of oxygen.

So, you develop lots of bulky muscle that your otherwise healthy heart cannot possibly sustain when you decide to do something that requires more endurance than the short bursts of exertion of wight lifting. Your body has the physical strength to cycle or run, but your heart cannot keep up with the demand.


You are so completely, utterly, and drastically wrong I don't even know where to begin. When you train with weights you induce SYSTEMATIC changes to your body, you build muscle, your bones get denser, your connective tissue stronger, you process oxygen and lactic acid more efficiently, your heart and cardiovascular system ALSO adapt getting fitter and stronger. Primarily anaerobic exercise still causes plenty of adaption and fitness on your aerobic energy pathways.

You do not develop "bulky" muscle that your heart cannot sustain. That is close to the dumbest thing I have ever heard. If you train primarily with weights, and then run, you will do a lot better than some couch potato, and LONG before you'd actually cause any damage to your heart you would get tired and stop running. Good lord that was a stupid paragraph.

Furthermore, it is clear that you've never done a set of heavy squats in your entire life or otherwise you'd know that your heart pounds like jackhammer for several minutes after that 30 seconds of anaerobic effort.

If you lift weights, whether to see how much you can lift, or to simply gain muscle mass for cosmetic reasons, it doesn't matter. You're a weight lifter.

I wasn't the one who conflated lifting weights for exercise (weight training) with a sport known for abusing pharmaceuticals to an unhealthy degree.

You may as well go on at length about the difference between Collegiate Wrestling and TV Wrasslin. But please don't.

As a grappler, yes I could. But thank you for providing an excellent example of why your post was stupid. Those are two completely different things. One is a sport that provides for healthy competition and the practice of would make you very healthy, the other is a type of entertainment whose participants often engage in dangerous and unhealthy life styles.
2012-12-01 06:09:55 AM  
1 votes:
When did jogging become synonymous with exercise and health? It is one of the least effective (and some would argue counter-productive) activities you can do to improve your health.

/sprint, lift weights, or play a sport.
2012-12-01 04:05:43 AM  
1 votes:

Oznog:

Driving a car doesn't make it stronger. It wears it out!


That's because a car doesn't rebuild itself, or build stronger parts to withstand greater stress.

Your body does.

Try it for yourself. Your quality of life will thank you for it.
2012-12-01 03:24:24 AM  
1 votes:

Oznog: I always thought it was strange that exercise was supposed to make you strong.

Driving a car doesn't make it stronger. It wears it out!

What's curious here is dogs. They can sleep like 22 hours a day and then be told it's playtime and bolt around at amazing speeds for an hour or two. WHY IS THAT?? Laziest lovable farks around, somehow in tip-top shape.


Your dogs are very different from my dogs.

5-10 minutes of intense activity, they are farking done.

20-30 minutes of moderate activity, ditto.

/ Then again, my Corgi's torso is taller than his legs.
// And the other one's a Pomeranian, so not big.
/// Running around the living room and up some stairs is like doing some hardcore parkour shiat from these dogs' perspectives.
2012-12-01 03:21:42 AM  
1 votes:

Oznog: I always thought it was strange that exercise was supposed to make you strong.

Driving a car doesn't make it stronger. It wears it out!

What's curious here is dogs. They can sleep like 22 hours a day and then be told it's playtime and bolt around at amazing speeds for an hour or two. WHY IS THAT?? Laziest lovable farks around, somehow in tip-top shape.


Exercise does make you strong.

You should try it with your brain sometime :p
2012-12-01 01:49:55 AM  
1 votes:

Doom MD: Even of this is true (and I'm extremely skeptical), this would be a problem for such a very small amount of the population. The article talks about differences in life expectancy but doesn't state which groups died of what. They throw in some garbage about marathon runners getting scarred enlarged hearts (I have yet to see a marathon runner present with this in my clinical practice). I would never, absent of other circumstances, advise a patient to limit their cardio to 30 minutes if they wanted to do more and are capable of such.


The only people I ever saw present with cardiomyopathy in this way seemed to be ex-NFL folks who were waaay larger than a normal human and had quit exercising when they retired. A decade or two of creating a ginormous, think walled heart to pump in a ginormous body. The enlarged heart then just goes boggy when they age and don't try to maintain.

Normal people? Never saw anything like this.
2012-12-01 01:19:16 AM  
1 votes:
Good thing I'm relaxing my heart muscles with plenty of alcohol. Also: it's a preservative.
2012-12-01 01:05:59 AM  
1 votes:
drtfa, but my interesting factoid for the day ... Every species on Earth has roughly (very roughly) the same number of heartbeats in their lifetime -- 1 billion. Link Link

So the average hummingbird has the same number of heart beats in its life as the blue whale. Kinda cool
2012-12-01 12:33:52 AM  
1 votes:
I'm gonna live forever!
2012-12-01 12:17:35 AM  
1 votes:
Between this, and the earlier greenlight about the wondrous health benefits of coffee, there is little doubt that I will live to 150.
 
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