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(Gizmodo)   The next time i see a hot girl at the bar, imma be like "Is your nickname Mercury? Cause you look habitable"   (gizmodo.com) divider line 19
    More: Cool, Imma, NASA, NASA Headquarters, NASA scientists, organic material  
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14514 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Nov 2012 at 2:07 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-11-30 02:57:20 PM
3 votes:
www.clashmusic.com
2012-11-30 02:12:07 PM
2 votes:
I am pretty damn hot
2012-11-30 01:25:21 PM
2 votes:

xynix: So a big rock smacks into Earth 65 million years ago and spreads a ton of organic material out into space where it swirls and twirls until some of it smacks into Mercury and most of it gets fried by the sun.

No evidence pointing to anything otherwise at this point.


You're thinking small. What if there are Mercury women? They're bound to be hot.
2012-11-30 06:16:47 PM
1 votes:
Our galaxy must be teeming with life if in our own solar system there are 3 planets that at one point could support or were close to supporting microorganisms.
2012-11-30 04:52:18 PM
1 votes:

theorellior: Why is it logical that life on Mercury would be giant lobster monkeys with big ears? I don't really get it. Plus the giant gold quartz crystals are and odd landscaping choice.


Big ears for better heat radiation, helps keep them cool. Insects like the heat. Giant crystals because fark you, that's why.
2012-11-30 04:12:38 PM
1 votes:

Day_Old_Dutchie: [img255.imageshack.us image 594x800]

On Mercury, they're crazy about my stellar rock'n'roll shuffleboard


Giant Insects...hellish heat...shuffleboard in space...hmmm..

Holy crap according to Life Mercury is Space Florida!
2012-11-30 03:13:37 PM
1 votes:
The planet's surface temperature ranges from 50 K (-369.67F/-223.15C) to 700 K (800.33F/426.85C).

Here's a handy chart for the less sciency people


img3.joyreactor.com
2012-11-30 03:12:31 PM
1 votes:
"Is your nickname Mercury? Cause you spin totally retro, babe"
2012-11-30 03:11:45 PM
1 votes:
Alex, I'll take potent potables for $600.
2012-11-30 03:07:58 PM
1 votes:
It's not patable water.
It's full of Mercury.
2012-11-30 02:48:15 PM
1 votes:

Khellendros: xynix: So a big rock smacks into Earth 65 million years ago and spreads a ton of organic material out into space where it swirls and twirls until some of it smacks into Mercury and most of it gets fried by the sun.

No evidence pointing to anything otherwise at this point.

No evidence points to what you're saying either. You're doing science backwards.


Sometime when I'm doing science backwards, I strike science on the back of the head right before I'm about to publish. This is called the "Kinetic Ungulate" and makes the whole peer-review process more restrictive which increases my pleasure.
2012-11-30 02:26:46 PM
1 votes:

mbillips: Is your name Mercury? Because you sure make the mercury rise in my thermometer, if you know what I mean.

/I mean my penis.


That's not where the thermometer is supposed to go.
2012-11-30 02:26:40 PM
1 votes:

xynix: So a big rock smacks into Earth 65 million years ago and spreads a ton of organic material out into space where it swirls and twirls until some of it smacks into Mercury and most of it gets fried by the sun.

No evidence pointing to anything otherwise at this point.


I keep staring at this comment.

I just...maybe if I...um...

Now I hurt.
/going to the painkiller thread
2012-11-30 02:26:27 PM
1 votes:

NobleHam: Mercury is still a hell of a long way from habitable. This discovery really doesn't matter much. We will never inhabit Mercury.


"Never" is an awfully long timespan. Mercury has about the same gravity as Mars, and a gigantic ball of pure iron for a core. Underground settlements for the purposes of mining that iron aren't completely out of the question in the distant future.

But anyway, this discovery is much more about finding out that water and organic compounds can be stable in environments where we previously thought they couldn't. And that impacts the scope of our search for life elsewhere in the universe. No one is suggesting Mercury as a vacation spot because there's some ice there.
2012-11-30 02:25:03 PM
1 votes:
i.imgur.com
2012-11-30 02:22:01 PM
1 votes:
At first I thought it was a chemistry/pharmacology joke

"Is your nickname Mercury? Cause you look habitable cause retardation in developing children"
2012-11-30 02:20:04 PM
1 votes:
I would have gone with "Is your name Mercury? Cause you look like your crater might be wet."

/chicks dig me

orclover: Organic? Is there a new definition of organic that they are using?


"Organic" just means carbon-based in chemistry terminology, if I recall. So "organic" chemicals can form without life, but not vice versa.
2012-11-30 02:11:21 PM
1 votes:

xynix: So a big rock smacks into Earth 65 million years ago and spreads a ton of organic material out into space where it swirls and twirls until some of it smacks into Mercury and most of it gets fried by the sun.

No evidence pointing to anything otherwise at this point.


Dafuq did I just read?
2012-11-30 01:00:27 PM
1 votes:
So a big rock smacks into Earth 65 million years ago and spreads a ton of organic material out into space where it swirls and twirls until some of it smacks into Mercury and most of it gets fried by the sun.

No evidence pointing to anything otherwise at this point.
 
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