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1951 clicks; posted to Business » on 30 Nov 2012 at 1:19 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-30 11:00:22 AM
2 votes:
die
2012-11-30 11:19:19 PM
1 votes:

Babwa Wawa: LOL. I'm not high. Hell, I'm not even speculating. MS announced Outlook for Android this week, citing fragmentation in the Android market, which is a nice way of saying that Exchange/Android integration sucks. See link below.

As for calendar integration, those fixes don't work across all enterprises, but good on you that it works for you. But the very fact that it doesn't work with the default settings, where WP and BB do, along with the various Activesync clusterfarks Apple has perpetrated, underscores the fact that APPL puts enterprise integration pretty far down the list.

And yeah, I've used Touchdown. It's a godawful mess. Being the best ActiveSync client on Android is like being the tallest midget.

http://m.techcrunch.com/2012/11/27/microsoft-says-many-gmail-users-wo u ld-consider-switching-to-outlook-com-launches-android-app-conversation -threading-more/?p=2&icid=art_next0


What are you talking about? You first say MS is going to create an Activesync application then you point to their new Outlook.com client? How is that suppose to work in an enterprise environment? So again MS has not nor will they put out an Activesync client to work across the enterprise framework. They will NOT make an application that works with Activesync in an enterprise world and this little Hotmail/Outlook.com app is worthless. Not to mention you could already use the m.hotmail.com as an exchange setup in any of the mail clients on any phone you can get your hands up, my parents have been running this same setup for years.

Also you haven't used Touchdown in a long time if you are saying that because they have massively overhauled it. It has been completely redone from the ground up over the last 6 months and it's very smooth now. Also the Touchdown HD version is great to use on tablets.

So once again this is you posting and talking out your ass about stuff you have no clue about.
2012-11-30 08:36:00 PM
1 votes:

Babwa Wawa: LOL. I'm not high. Hell, I'm not even speculating. MS announced Outlook for Android this week, citing fragmentation in the Android market, which is a nice way of saying that Exchange/Android integration sucks. See link below.

As for calendar integration, those fixes don't work across all enterprises, but good on you that it works for you. But the very fact that it doesn't work with the default settings, where WP and BB do, along with the various Activesync clusterfarks Apple has perpetrated, underscores the fact that APPL puts enterprise integration pretty far down the list.

And yeah, I've used Touchdown. It's a godawful mess. Being the best ActiveSync client on Android is like being the tallest midget.

http://m.techcrunch.com/2012/11/27/microsoft-says-many-gmail-users-wo u ld-consider-switching-to-outlook-com-launches-android-app-conversation -threading-more/?p=2&icid=art_next0


That's actually an app to sync with Outlook.com, which is the rebranded version of Hotmail web mail, not full-on Exchange syncing. From the reviews on the Google Play page for the app, they just repurposed the existing Hotmail app made by Seven.
2012-11-30 07:50:41 PM
1 votes:
LOL. I'm not high. Hell, I'm not even speculating. MS announced Outlook for Android this week, citing fragmentation in the Android market, which is a nice way of saying that Exchange/Android integration sucks. See link below.

As for calendar integration, those fixes don't work across all enterprises, but good on you that it works for you. But the very fact that it doesn't work with the default settings, where WP and BB do, along with the various Activesync clusterfarks Apple has perpetrated, underscores the fact that APPL puts enterprise integration pretty far down the list.

And yeah, I've used Touchdown. It's a godawful mess. Being the best ActiveSync client on Android is like being the tallest midget.

http://m.techcrunch.com/2012/11/27/microsoft-says-many-gmail-users-wo u ld-consider-switching-to-outlook-com-launches-android-app-conversation -threading-more/?p=2&icid=art_next0
2012-11-30 05:59:41 PM
1 votes:

USA Prime Credit Peggy: Really, how stupid is it that you have to run TWO BES servers... one for pre-os10 devices, and a completely different one for version 10 and up. Nail in the coffin right there.


That is exactly why we are moving away from RIM. Our German counterparts are LIVID with the decision, they still have Blackberrys with trackballs and are horrified at change.
2012-11-30 05:24:23 PM
1 votes:

Mad_Radhu: lohphat: How about stable and reliable enterprise group calendaring support.

For the last two companies we have been at, Exchange works just fine Calendaring and PIM. I've never used a BlackBerry, so pardon my ignorance, but what can a BES do calendar-wise that an Android /iOS/Windows Phone handset CAN'T do? I was under the impression that the BES mainly just acted as a middleman for Exchange and the BlackBerry for most companies, anyway, so Exchange calendaring features would always be a superset of BlackBerry features for most users.


Non BES integration is very buggy (see iOS Exchange calendaring bug which took out entire corp scheduling systems). Android has its share of bugs too because of the market fragmentation -- almost every device's Android build is unique and thus bugs everywhere.

Often on non-BES phones you can't do a group invite or if you deleted a meeting it never sent the cancellation to the other attendees or booked room to release it.

BES was an MDM solution before its time. Now Mobile Iron, Zenprise, AirWatch, etc. can block apps do remote screen support, inventory, push apps, central policy push, etc. but it comes at a premium.
2012-11-30 04:26:51 PM
1 votes:
Sorta off-topic, but I'm looking to buy a new cell phone in the next few weeks, and one of the operators here is having a promotion on the Motorola RAZR HD. Anyone have any experience with this phone, good or bad? Reviews are positive but not beaming, so I was wondering if any of you had any input.

It's tough to decide, really. The iPhone 5 is right out, because even though the design and build quality are apparently excellent (A) maps are still broken, and that's one functionality I use all the time, (B) it's still way, way too expensive to get one with enough storage for what I use it for, even with the new-contract subsidy, and (C) Apple still hasn't come out with one that works on French 4G frequencies.

On the other hand, I really like the functionality of the Samsung Galaxy SIII and everything I've heard says its a great phone, but it is OMGHUEG sized and the plastic case just feels cheap.
2012-11-30 04:17:41 PM
1 votes:

Mad_Radhu: It is probably because I've been using Windows Phones, but those features have both been working flawlessly on my recent phones. OOO auto-replies work especially well because I get the option to set different wording for internal and external replies.


Yeah, MS does their ActiveSync client right. Which makes the fact that they're developing Outlook for Android all that much more interesting. I will consider an Android phone once that comes out. I could live without a calendar, but an inaccurate calendar is worse than nothing at all.
2012-11-30 03:33:26 PM
1 votes:

AcneVulgaris: R.A.Danny: I guess it is possible. Apple made a fairly decent comeback.

RIM doesn't have a Steve Jobs returning to yank their heads out of their asses.


To be fair neither does Apple anymore.
2012-11-30 03:25:29 PM
1 votes:

R.A.Danny: I guess it is possible. Apple made a fairly decent comeback.


RIM doesn't have a Steve Jobs returning to yank their heads out of their asses.
2012-11-30 03:22:14 PM
1 votes:
In the consumer market, RIM is done. They may still have a chance in the Enterprise market, if they can get a superior, must-have product for iOS/WinMo/Android management. Otherwise, as has been alluded to above, ActiveSync is "good enough" for most places.

/Farewell, Nortel 2.0.
2012-11-30 03:12:53 PM
1 votes:
It is so farking easy to fix RIM that I don't understand why people don't get it....

First things first - realize what your biggest market advantage is, and know that it's not BBM, or BES or the fact that it's a "business" phone. That's stupid. Your biggest market advantage is you are basically the only phone out there with a phyiscal keyboard, and you need to use that to retain your customers. There are still TONS of people out there who continue to buy Blackberries because they don't like the touchscreen keyboard, but they're slowly making their way over because BBs suck balls otherwise.

All RIM needs to do is create a smartphone that is as nice and awesome as the Samsung Galaxy series or the iPhone series, and put a physical keyboard attachment at the bottom. Sell them together and BOOM - you've retained basically your entire customer base, and you may even attract some new ones. It wouldn't be a "tall" phone by any means (think iPhone 4 height, but with the attachment, it would still likely be smaller than the Galaxy S3).

Oh, and pay someone a lot of money to do some real marketing for you, because otherwise you're just going to have another product that no one knows anything about.
2012-11-30 02:47:45 PM
1 votes:
My brother has a dirt-old Blackberry Curve from his work. He figured he'd look up information on BB 10 on the device so he could decide if he wanted to upgrade to that or some other phone. The site first caused the browser to crash, then the phone. I think he's done with BB.
2012-11-30 02:19:52 PM
1 votes:

lohphat: How about stable and reliable enterprise group calendaring support. Bberries are not smartphones, they are phones with a PIM and a real kb. That's all I want in a phone, not a game or video console.


Unfortunately, the vast majority of both markets have more demands than that, demands which are better satisfied by a myriad of their competitors, and thus RIM are stuck in their current predicament.
2012-11-30 02:15:25 PM
1 votes:

lohphat: How about stable and reliable enterprise group calendaring support.


We just got done moving all of our users, 45,000 of them, to Google. The largest complaint by far is Google Calendar. I don't understand why Google can't manage to replicate Exchange functionality, it shouldn't be that difficult.

Still, having Google manage the mail problems is worth having a shiatty calendar, and we're saving over 6 million a year.
2012-11-30 12:11:19 PM
1 votes:
Unless RIM creates some kind of game changer that is on par, or better than an Android or iPhone, they do not stand a chance of ever seeing a single penny from me again.

I honestly do not know what else they can innovate that suddenly makes them more relevant that Google or Apple.
2012-11-30 11:36:25 AM
1 votes:
I'm one of the last holdouts and even I'm about to go buy a Samsung or whatever. Sorry RIM it's too late.
2012-11-30 10:14:00 AM
1 votes:
It'll be some job
 
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