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(Sky & Telescope)   TFette has her first article printed in Sky & Telescope, on how amateur astronomers took over an old radio telescope in the Netherlands. Available in digital and from something called a "news stand"   (skyandtelescope.com) divider line 22
    More: Spiffy, Sky & Telescope, TFette, radio telescopes, amateur astronomers, Netherlands, Mars Exploration, stsci, eyepieces  
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256 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 30 Nov 2012 at 11:06 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-30 04:25:59 AM
Subby here, little background for those interested, I'm doing my PhD in the Netherlands in radio astronomy and came across the guys running what used to be the world's biggest radio telescope in the 1950s- it came into disrepair after it became obsolete, and a few years ago some amateurs recognized the opportunity and took the dish over. They've done some seriously impressive projects with it since, listening to pulsars and galactic rotation curves of Andromeda galaxy and the like, so when I pitched a story about them to Sky & Telescope they thought it was quite interesting.

I'm quite proud of this actually because there are two major astronomy magazines in the US, Astronomy and S&T, and while I've written two articles for the former this is my first in the latter. Of course kinda hard to share with y'all because you have to pay for it, but I thought some geeky Farkers might be interested enough to seek it out!
 
2012-11-30 05:20:42 AM
Cool.

I have S&T magazines from the seventies.
 
2012-11-30 06:30:53 AM
...listening to Pulsars and Galactic Rotation 'Curves of Andromeda'...

Now, if I can get these to download to my Ipod.

Thanks, I'll check it out.
 
2012-11-30 08:37:51 AM
I wanted a read more > button. :( 

/With a name like Dwingeloo, I thought it was in the Australian outback. 
 
2012-11-30 08:57:12 AM
If you're ever in Deventer, say Hi to my folks.
 
2012-11-30 09:00:54 AM

Andromeda: Subby here, little background for those interested, I'm doing my PhD in the Netherlands in radio astronomy and came across the guys running what used to be the world's biggest radio telescope in the 1950s- it came into disrepair after it became obsolete, and a few years ago some amateurs recognized the opportunity and took the dish over. They've done some seriously impressive projects with it since, listening to pulsars and galactic rotation curves of Andromeda galaxy and the like, so when I pitched a story about them to Sky & Telescope they thought it was quite interesting.

I'm quite proud of this actually because there are two major astronomy magazines in the US, Astronomy and S&T, and while I've written two articles for the former this is my first in the latter. Of course kinda hard to share with y'all because you have to pay for it, but I thought some geeky Farkers might be interested enough to seek it out!


Congratulations! That's fantastic.
 
2012-11-30 10:23:08 AM
Andromeda:
Congratulations!

/Dwingeloo is a great word.
 
2012-11-30 10:59:03 AM
Weird, I had a similar story published in the Penthouse Forums
 
2012-11-30 11:24:39 AM
I just got my first telescope for my birthday and enjoy having my mind blown on a clear night. First thing I found was Jupiter. Looked like they were having bad weather up there. The almost full moon is spectacular. End CSB.
 
2012-11-30 11:25:48 AM
You know, I looked, and Best Buy doesn't even SELL "a news stand". I bet it's an Apple product.
 
2012-11-30 11:27:18 AM

RoyHobbs22: I just got my first telescope for my birthday and enjoy having my mind blown on a clear night. First thing I found was Jupiter. Looked like they were having bad weather up there.


The Great Red Spot keeps battering the Jovian equivalent of Florida constantly.
 
2012-11-30 11:39:54 AM

Jubeebee: You know, I looked, and Best Buy doesn't even SELL "a news stand". I bet it's an Apple product.


nope, that would be "iNewsstand"
 
2012-11-30 12:11:18 PM
Question for subby:

What power telescope would you recommend for attempting to view a newsstand?
 
2012-11-30 01:22:23 PM
Fellow radio astronomer here. Hard to believe that a 25 m dish was ever the biggest in the world. Since I can't access the article immediately, I'm just going to ask how much work they had to put into updating the backend electronics of the telescope. Wiki says that they shut down science operations before 2000... given that it's sitting near ASTRON, I guess the dutch stripped the electronics out before abandoning the dish?
 
2012-11-30 01:34:24 PM
Congratulations on the publication of your article. Brilliant women are the sexiest women.
 
2012-11-30 01:37:21 PM

Andromeda: 'm quite proud of this actually because there are two major astronomy magazines in the US, Astronomy and S&T, and while I've written two articles for the former this is my first in the latter. Of course kinda hard to share with y'all because you have to pay for it, but I thought some geeky Farkers might be interested enough to seek it out!


Congrats. I have a subscription to both magazines and I'll look for your article when I find my copy of S&T. You can also buy single digital issues from Zinio.
 
2012-11-30 02:44:49 PM

Andromeda: Subby here, little background for those interested, I'm doing my PhD in the Netherlands in radio astronomy and came across the guys running what used to be the world's biggest radio telescope in the 1950s- it came into disrepair after it became obsolete, and a few years ago some amateurs recognized the opportunity and took the dish over. They've done some seriously impressive projects with it since, listening to pulsars and galactic rotation curves of Andromeda galaxy and the like, so when I pitched a story about them to Sky & Telescope they thought it was quite interesting.


Interesting. How'd the amateurs take the dish over? There are a couple of large dishes (~50-60m) in serious disrepair just up the hill from my local club. I've been told that radio astronomy can be done even with little satellite TV dishes, but I'd imagine these would have just a wee bit more resolution.
 
2012-11-30 03:04:40 PM
TFette has her first article printed in Sky & Telescope, on how amateur astronomers took over an old radio telescope in the Netherlands.


I hope this was done with broadsides and cutlasses,

off to RTFA



Darn
 
2012-11-30 05:19:57 PM

tallguywithglasseson: Weird, I had a similar story published in the Penthouse Forums


And you never thought it would happen to you, right?
 
2012-11-30 07:13:23 PM

Andromeda: Subby here, little background for those interested, I'm doing my PhD in the Netherlands in radio astronomy and came across the guys running what used to be the world's biggest radio telescope in the 1950s- it came into disrepair after it became obsolete, and a few years ago some amateurs recognized the opportunity and took the dish over. They've done some seriously impressive projects with it since, listening to pulsars and galactic rotation curves of Andromeda galaxy and the like, so when I pitched a story about them to Sky & Telescope they thought it was quite interesting.

I'm quite proud of this actually because there are two major astronomy magazines in the US, Astronomy and S&T, and while I've written two articles for the former this is my first in the latter. Of course kinda hard to share with y'all because you have to pay for it, but I thought some geeky Farkers might be interested enough to seek it out!


I'm in like with you.
 
2012-12-01 06:38:08 AM

Andromeda: Subby here, little background for those interested, I'm doing my PhD in the Netherlands in radio astronomy and came across the guys running what used to be the world's biggest radio telescope in the 1950s- it came into disrepair after it became obsolete, and a few years ago some amateurs recognized the opportunity and took the dish over. They've done some seriously impressive projects with it since, listening to pulsars and galactic rotation curves of Andromeda galaxy and the like, so when I pitched a story about them to Sky & Telescope they thought it was quite interesting.

I'm quite proud of this actually because there are two major astronomy magazines in the US, Astronomy and S&T, and while I've written two articles for the former this is my first in the latter. Of course kinda hard to share with y'all because you have to pay for it, but I thought some geeky Farkers might be interested enough to seek it out!


My issue just came in the mail the other day, but I haven't opened it yet. I will definitely read your article, and congratulations on getting published! Sounds like a very cool thing, reclaiming defunct installations and reviving them for amateur use. I'm jealous. Good luck with your PhD!
 
2012-12-01 08:00:01 AM
Thanks all for the kind comments and sorry for not responding earlier- Friday night in Amsterdam interfered...

Basically the dish was used up until the 90s and then it was decommissioned, everything was stripped and the dish was only saved because the price of scrap metal at the time didn't make it worth taking it down. Then after a few years some amateurs approached ASTRON (the Dutch radio astronomy organization located like 200ft away from the thing) and they agreed to hand it over to the guys for like a Euro. So all the electronics were built from scratch, it's now a national monument, and they've secured a lot of money to restore it... great testament to the power of a few dedicated individuals if you ask me!

plaidhat, you should RTFA as I have advice on amateurs who want to take old dishes around them. ;-) But in short, one's best bet is usually contacting the local amateur radio club (ie Ham radio) because those guys really know their electronics. Dwingeloo telescope never would've gotten off the ground without the help of those guys.
 
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