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(Smithsonian Magazine)   Bodies of climbers who die while attempting to climb Mt. Everest are used as c) landmarks (images of bodies in article)   (blogs.smithsonianmag.com) divider line 269
    More: Cool, Mount Everest  
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34950 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Nov 2012 at 5:21 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-29 02:45:21 PM
that's just... wrong.
 
2012-11-29 02:49:48 PM

FlashHarry: that's just... wrong.


Well it's not like the dead climbers are still using them.
 
2012-11-29 02:49:50 PM
Why can't they just take a helicopter?
 
2012-11-29 02:53:04 PM

FlashHarry: that's just... wrong.


More useful than most dead folk are. Hell, more useful than a lot of the live ones out there.
 
2012-11-29 02:55:04 PM

Because People in power are Stupid: Why can't they just take a helicopter?


Too high:  The top of Everest is at the altitude that airliners cruise at.   Beck Weathers and Gau were barely helicoptered out.  The living and the dead usually get left behind in the "Death Zone".

 
 
2012-11-29 03:00:34 PM
"Into thin Air", documents it rather nicely as well as a host of other books.
 
2012-11-29 03:05:13 PM

FlashHarry: that's just... wrong.


Nothing else to be done.
 
2012-11-29 03:06:20 PM
Anatoli Boukreev: Wrote an interesting rubuttal to "Into Thin Air."
 
2012-11-29 03:09:50 PM
I like adrenalin as much as the next guy, but when I am using bodies of those that have failed before me it's time to find a safer way to thrill seek.
 
2012-11-29 03:10:34 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Why can't they just take a helicopter?

Too high:  The top of Everest is at the altitude that airliners cruise at.   Beck Weathers and Gau were barely helicoptered out.  The living and the dead usually get left behind in the "Death Zone".


http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/0509/whats_new/helicopte r_ everest.html
 
2012-11-29 03:12:58 PM
Should I clutch my pearls or something? Don't go into the Death Zone or approach it without knowing the risks. Also know that there are a lot of douchecanoes who will not let anything or anyone get in their way in making it to the top.*

*With the help of oxygen and Sherpas carrying their shiat for them.
 
2012-11-29 03:13:11 PM

Because People in power are Stupid: Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Why can't they just take a helicopter?

Too high:  The top of Everest is at the altitude that airliners cruise at.   Beck Weathers and Gau were barely helicoptered out.  The living and the dead usually get left behind in the "Death Zone".

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/0509/whats_new/helicopte r_ everest.html


Not generally available nor practical given the terrian, communications, altitude, finances and logistics.  That was a stunt.
 
2012-11-29 03:17:47 PM
 
2012-11-29 03:18:03 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Why can't they just take a helicopter?

Too high:  The top of Everest is at the altitude that airliners cruise at.   Beck Weathers and Gau were barely helicoptered out.  The living and the dead usually get left behind in the "Death Zone".

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/0509/whats_new/helicopte r_ everest.html

Not generally available nor practical given the terrian, communications, altitude, finances and logistics.  That was a stunt.


A stunt, you mean like climbing Everest.

http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-adventure/climbing/mountaineeri ng /Giving-Everest-the-Bird.html


I'll wait for the helicopter tours.
 
2012-11-29 03:19:34 PM

sammyk: I like adrenalin as much as the next guy, but when I am using bodies of those that have failed before me it's time to find a safer way to thrill seek.


Mountain climbing isn't about adrenalin rushes. It's a slower process and brings a different kind of satisfaction.
 
2012-11-29 03:20:28 PM
I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"
 
2012-11-29 03:24:24 PM

Because People in power are Stupid: I'll wait for the helicopter tours.


Have fun.  It is one thing to pay $100.000's of dollars to risk your life, another to pay someone $5000 to save it.  The assumption that high on the mountain means you are on your own is a given, many/most of the bodies came before the stunt you seem to like.  You asked for an answer, I gave you one, maybe not the most informed, but I'm sure I am a small tad more qualified than you to discuss realistic aviation.
 
I didn't whiz in you Wheaties, you did.
 
2012-11-29 03:24:29 PM

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: FlashHarry: that's just... wrong.

More useful than most dead folk are. Hell, more useful than a lot of the live ones out there.


agreed. it just seems sad and lonely. but such is the life of an 8000-meter climber.
 
2012-11-29 03:33:39 PM
 
2012-11-29 03:34:02 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: I didn't whiz in you Wheaties, you did.


You whiz in me Wheaties because their there.
 
2012-11-29 03:45:42 PM
Both Aydin Irmak and Lincoln Hall were left for dead by climbers on the way to the summit, only to be rescued (and even walk down) by others later. Beck Weathers was also prematurly given up for dead. "Well, he's alive and breathing, but ahhh he'll probably die and I have a summet to make" strikes me as a little selfish, but I am not a climber.
 
2012-11-29 03:48:30 PM

vernonFL: I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"

i483.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-29 03:51:38 PM
I saw an article recently that showed more pictures of said corpses. While you are out there cleaning them up, subs, can you grab some oxygen canisters?
 
2012-11-29 03:55:41 PM

coco ebert: sammyk: I like adrenalin as much as the next guy, but when I am using bodies of those that have failed before me it's time to find a safer way to thrill seek.

Mountain climbing isn't about adrenalin rushes. It's a slower process and brings a different kind of satisfaction.


Climbing Mt. Everest must be very satisfactory
www.bagofnothing.com
...if you like standing in line
 
2012-11-29 03:57:33 PM

vernonFL: I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"


Maybe I should stop calling my bedroom that...
 
2012-11-29 04:04:52 PM
Here's an article with many more pictures and some videos of the dead climbers.
 
2012-11-29 04:07:26 PM
Do they pose the bodies so they're pointing up the path or something? Like they're directing traffic? Seems kind of superfluous anyway, I mean,if you're going up that's probably towards the top.

/not serious at all, stop looking at me like that.
 
2012-11-29 04:09:51 PM
Am I the only one who read the first part of that and *really* that the bit after c: was going to be 'firewood'...?
 
2012-11-29 04:23:22 PM
Great, now I have a farking  Greensleeves earworm.
 
2012-11-29 04:49:12 PM
24.media.tumblr.com
Ice to see you!
 
2012-11-29 04:59:47 PM

coco ebert: sammyk: I like adrenalin as much as the next guy, but when I am using bodies of those that have failed before me it's time to find a safer way to thrill seek.

Mountain climbing isn't about adrenalin rushes. It's a slower process and brings a different kind of satisfaction.


I know. I climbed this one many years ago. It's a lot more cerebral than say bungie jumping or racing fast cars but it still an adrenalin rush. 

www.wildlandart.com
 
2012-11-29 05:26:35 PM
It's rather sad, but it's simply too taxing on the living to carry dead weight down the mountain. Obviously some aren't able to carry their living weight.
 
2012-11-29 05:26:42 PM
3.bp.blogspot.com

The body of "Green Boots," an Indian climber who died in 1996 and is believed to be Tsewang Paljor, lies near a cave that all climbers must pass on their way to the peak. Green Boots now serves as a waypoint marker that climbers use to gauge how near they are to the summit. Green Boots met his end after becoming separated from his party. He sought refuge in a mountain overhang, but to no avail. He sat there shivering in the cold until he died.


SWIPER, NO SWIPING!
 
2012-11-29 05:27:08 PM
A) kindling
B) sleds
D) erotic rest breaks ("Crack open a cold one!")
 
2012-11-29 05:28:12 PM
How many climbers don't die? Because 200 dead and 100 alive would be a problem, but if 200 die, and 100000 climb successfully, then you have a bigger chance of dying in a car crash.
 
2012-11-29 05:28:16 PM

vernonFL: I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"


How about Danger Zones? Are they ok?
 
2012-11-29 05:31:01 PM

pudding7: FlashHarry: that's just... wrong.

Nothing else to be done.


Sherpas will usually not approach or touch a dead body.
 
2012-11-29 05:31:23 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Why can't they just take a helicopter?

Too high:  The top of Everest is at the altitude that airliners cruise at.   Beck Weathers and Gau were barely helicoptered out.  The living and the dead usually get left behind in the "Death Zone".


Don't know if you caught Banff FF last year, but there was a movie of a sherpa and another dude who paraglided off the summit. So there's always that option.

Also, I swear I've seen this story on the farks in the past year...
 
2012-11-29 05:31:56 PM

thisiszombocom: vernonFL: I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"

How about Danger Zones? Are they ok?


They are, but the highway going to it is a biatch.
 
2012-11-29 05:32:05 PM

sammyk: coco ebert: sammyk: I like adrenalin as much as the next guy, but when I am using bodies of those that have failed before me it's time to find a safer way to thrill seek.

Mountain climbing isn't about adrenalin rushes. It's a slower process and brings a different kind of satisfaction.

I know. I climbed this one many years ago. It's a lot more cerebral than say bungie jumping or racing fast cars but it still an adrenalin rush. 

[www.wildlandart.com image 540x360]


I love the Winds. The greatest mountain range most people have never heard of.
 
2012-11-29 05:32:07 PM
It's a mountain. Why don't they just roll the bodies down the steep side? They can make a game of it, using spent oxygen cannisters to make it like bowling.
 
2012-11-29 05:32:19 PM

sammyk: I like adrenalin as much as the next guy, but when I am using bodies of those that have failed before me it's time to find a safer way to thrill seek.


I wouldn't be to keen on seeing the corpses, but the only reason they are there is because they are so difficult to move. There are plenty of other activities that people die doing but they remove the bodies. Think if all the people who drowned in a lake were still preserved somehow and floating there.
 
2012-11-29 05:32:58 PM
Thrill-seeker problems.
 
2012-11-29 05:33:39 PM
images1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-11-29 05:34:17 PM
I'm sure the bodies are frozen solid and stuck to the surrounding ice and snow and rock. Also, kudos to subby for an amusingly callous use of the "cool" tag.
 
2012-11-29 05:34:43 PM
we do the same in new orleans. year round...
 
2012-11-29 05:35:12 PM
threadjack here, I am traveling from Maryland to Austin Texas, a 2 day trip. How can I drink beer (Hi Drew!) and stay on the bus without problems? Any ideas about entertaining myself?


end threadjack and on topic,

screw climbing to low oxygen levels without canisters. Give me sea level and maybe a 2500ft slow ascent wearing shorts and having access to a hotel after the climb down.
 
2012-11-29 05:35:43 PM

GoodHomer: It's a mountain. Why don't they just roll the bodies down the steep side? They can make a game of it, using spent oxygen cannisters to make it like bowling.


images3.wikia.nocookie.net

Agrees
 
2012-11-29 05:35:53 PM
Oops! Google Chrome could not connect to blogs.smithsonianmag.com!

Farked?
 
2012-11-29 05:36:44 PM
Hang a left at Old Bonsey, then climb once you get to One-Legged Pete. When you get to Ate-His-Partner, you're on the home stretch.
 
2012-11-29 05:38:03 PM
vernonFL
I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"


i.imgur.com
"It's just a name, like the Death Forbidden Zone, or the Zone of No Return.
All the zones have names like that in the Galaxy of Terror.
Off you go. Pleasant trip. "
 
2012-11-29 05:38:42 PM

DrRatchet: Both Aydin Irmak and Lincoln Hall were left for dead by climbers on the way to the summit, only to be rescued (and even walk down) by others later. Beck Weathers was also prematurly given up for dead. "Well, he's alive and breathing, but ahhh he'll probably die and I have a summet to make" strikes me as a little selfish, but I am not a climber.


He was left on the way back down. His group was trapped in a blizzard and hurricane-force winds (visibility of only a few yards). Weathers was unresponsive, and the guides left him behind because they were physically unable to carry him due to thin air and difficult terrain. They felt that if they didn't push on toward shelter then the entire group was going to die.
 
2012-11-29 05:39:16 PM
I can see applications in other sports. Bowling would be more interesting if you were throwing a skull at 10 delicately-balanced shin bones.
 
2012-11-29 05:39:17 PM
i48.tinypic.com.
 
2012-11-29 05:40:18 PM
Thanks for the ride, lady.
 
2012-11-29 05:43:03 PM
Bodies of climbers who die while attempting to climb Mt. Everest are used as c) landmarks Jerky Treats
 
2012-11-29 05:44:35 PM
Just watch out for the tattooed ones inside caves
 
2012-11-29 05:45:07 PM
I wonder if they dropped any good loot.
 
2012-11-29 05:46:09 PM
At least the idle rich have found a use on this planet.
 
2012-11-29 05:47:58 PM

Because People in power are Stupid: Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Why can't they just take a helicopter?

Too high:  The top of Everest is at the altitude that airliners cruise at.   Beck Weathers and Gau were barely helicoptered out.  The living and the dead usually get left behind in the "Death Zone".

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/0509/whats_new/helicopte r_ everest.html

Not generally available nor practical given the terrian, communications, altitude, finances and logistics.  That was a stunt.

A stunt, you mean like climbing Everest.

http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-adventure/climbing/mountaineeri ng /Giving-Everest-the-Bird.html


I'll wait for the helicopter tours.


I thought they were giving Biden the bird?
 
2012-11-29 05:48:41 PM
Seeing that we keep having this thread, shouldn't it get its own tag?
 
2012-11-29 05:49:12 PM
turn right at Fred, go straight on till you see Marvin then hang a left.
 
2012-11-29 05:49:19 PM
Link is farked. Anyone have the pictures?
 
2012-11-29 05:49:30 PM

wallywam1: DrRatchet: Both Aydin Irmak and Lincoln Hall were left for dead by climbers on the way to the summit, only to be rescued (and even walk down) by others later. Beck Weathers was also prematurly given up for dead. "Well, he's alive and breathing, but ahhh he'll probably die and I have a summet to make" strikes me as a little selfish, but I am not a climber.

He was left on the way back down. His group was trapped in a blizzard and hurricane-force winds (visibility of only a few yards). Weathers was unresponsive, and the guides left him behind because they were physically unable to carry him due to thin air and difficult terrain. They felt that if they didn't push on toward shelter then the entire group was going to die.


it's not really so much being selfish to reach the summit, it's more being aware of the fact that you can't really do anything. low oxygen, cold, etc all create complications that make otherwise easy activities like walking almost impossible
 
2012-11-29 05:49:45 PM
But where do they bury the survi... nevermind.
 
2012-11-29 05:49:50 PM

DrewCurtisJr: Think if all the people who drowned in a lake were still preserved somehow and floating there.


In some lakes they are
 
2012-11-29 05:50:09 PM
there are old climbers
and there are bold climbers
but there are no old/bold climbers
 
2012-11-29 05:50:25 PM

walkerhound: Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Why can't they just take a helicopter?

Too high:  The top of Everest is at the altitude that airliners cruise at.   Beck Weathers and Gau were barely helicoptered out.  The living and the dead usually get left behind in the "Death Zone".

Don't know if you caught Banff FF last year, but there was a movie of a sherpa and another dude who paraglided off the summit. So there's always that option.

Also, I swear I've seen this story on the farks in the past year...


I know I remember one that was a mountain or woods at the base of a mountain where people wondered off to die I think. Seems like it was Japan and involved bringing dishonor to the family or being a failure, getting fired kind of stuff. IIRC they were left there also.
 
2012-11-29 05:51:21 PM

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: FlashHarry: that's just... wrong.

More useful than most dead folk are. Hell, more useful than a lot of the live ones out there.


As my father used to say, "Make yourself useful as well as ornamental."
 
2012-11-29 05:51:47 PM

thisiszombocom: vernonFL: I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"

How about Danger Zones? Are they ok?


Only the highway that leads to them.
 
2012-11-29 05:52:00 PM
"Take a left at Fred and trek about 800 meters, then take a left. If you come across Bob, you've missed your turn."
 
2012-11-29 05:52:06 PM

wallywam1: DrRatchet: Both Aydin Irmak and Lincoln Hall were left for dead by climbers on the way to the summit, only to be rescued (and even walk down) by others later. Beck Weathers was also prematurly given up for dead. "Well, he's alive and breathing, but ahhh he'll probably die and I have a summet to make" strikes me as a little selfish, but I am not a climber.

He was left on the way back down. His group was trapped in a blizzard and hurricane-force winds (visibility of only a few yards). Weathers was unresponsive, and the guides left him behind because they were physically unable to carry him due to thin air and difficult terrain. They felt that if they didn't push on toward shelter then the entire group was going to die.


The Beck Weathers story is pretty crazy from that day. Not sure if I consider him the most lucky or least lucky.
 
2012-11-29 05:52:40 PM

dejavoodoo64: walkerhound: Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Why can't they just take a helicopter?

Too high:  The top of Everest is at the altitude that airliners cruise at.   Beck Weathers and Gau were barely helicoptered out.  The living and the dead usually get left behind in the "Death Zone".

Don't know if you caught Banff FF last year, but there was a movie of a sherpa and another dude who paraglided off the summit. So there's always that option.

Also, I swear I've seen this story on the farks in the past year...

I know I remember one that was a mountain or woods at the base of a mountain where people wondered off to die I think. Seems like it was Japan and involved bringing dishonor to the family or being a failure, getting fired kind of stuff. IIRC they were left there also.


This place?
 
2012-11-29 05:54:21 PM
Climbing Everest 1953-1980 = Amazing. 1980-1990= Cool. 1990-Now = Attention whore.
 
2012-11-29 05:54:29 PM
I'm the first to have a a Jack?

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-11-29 05:57:10 PM
I still don't understand this blatant disrespect for the dead. I mean, sure the other climbers can't do anything to help them, but they shouldn't just leave the dead bodies up there, considering all they'd have to do is wait until the dead guys freeze solid and then smash bits of them off with a rock, and toss them over the nearest ledges. The sherpas at the bottom could just sweep up all the bits into an urn or something. Sure, there'd probably be some parts that'd get lost in a crevice on the way down or maybe eaten by mountain goats or something but seriously, we're talking about giving these people a dignified final resting place.

At the very least, you'd think some of the climbers coming back down could kick a corpsesicle out of the snow and ride it down like a bobsled, or just tie a bunch of garbage around it-they pack their garbage out, don't they?-set the stiff on fire and lob it off the mountainside like some kind of a Viking Air Burial (bonus points if an oxygen tank explodes like a firework, of course)

We're talking basic respect for the dead, here.
 
2012-11-29 05:57:59 PM
Yeah... They just leave them there.
 
2012-11-29 05:59:51 PM
DrewCurtisJr: Think if all the people who drowned in a lake were still preserved somehow and floating there.

I would tap that

static.starcitygames.com
 
2012-11-29 05:59:57 PM
They should dress up and pose them all weekend at Bernie's style
 
2012-11-29 06:00:01 PM
There are so many bodies around Everest, I'm surprised A.R. Leak and Sons haven't tried to build a funeral home at the base camp.
 
2012-11-29 06:00:28 PM
Anyone ever wonder what cool shiat could be found underneath all that snow and ice? Not only there, but say, in the Arctic, Alaska, etc - like the politician Hale Boggs?
 
2012-11-29 06:00:42 PM

toraque: I still don't understand this blatant disrespect for the dead. I mean, sure the other climbers can't do anything to help them, but they shouldn't just leave the dead bodies up there, considering all they'd have to do is wait until the dead guys freeze solid and then smash bits of them off with a rock, and toss them over the nearest ledges. The sherpas at the bottom could just sweep up all the bits into an urn or something. Sure, there'd probably be some parts that'd get lost in a crevice on the way down or maybe eaten by mountain goats or something but seriously, we're talking about giving these people a dignified final resting place.

At the very least, you'd think some of the climbers coming back down could kick a corpsesicle out of the snow and ride it down like a bobsled, or just tie a bunch of garbage around it-they pack their garbage out, don't they?-set the stiff on fire and lob it off the mountainside like some kind of a Viking Air Burial (bonus points if an oxygen tank explodes like a firework, of course)

We're talking basic respect for the dead, here.


Have you ever tried to drive a zamboni up a steep cliff?
 
2012-11-29 06:02:16 PM
Now the object of this expedition is to see if we can find any traces of last year's expedition.

a248.e.akamai.net
 
2012-11-29 06:06:15 PM

nytmare: How many climbers don't die? Because 200 dead and 100 alive would be a problem, but if 200 die, and 100000 climb successfully, then you have a bigger chance of dying in a car crash.


People who attempt stuff like this don't consider the chance to die as much as the chance to live.
 
2012-11-29 06:07:55 PM
Best use of the Cool tag.
 
2012-11-29 06:08:01 PM

DrRatchet: Both Aydin Irmak and Lincoln Hall were left for dead by climbers on the way to the summit, only to be rescued (and even walk down) by others later. Beck Weathers was also prematurly given up for dead. "Well, he's alive and breathing, but ahhh he'll probably die and I have a summet to make" strikes me as a little selfish, but I am not a climber.


I would assume it's an "every man for himself" situation, and if you turn into a hero all of a sudden, it could mean that you just chose to die.
 
2012-11-29 06:10:34 PM
If each climber picked up a bone and an empty O2 Bottle on the way down the mountain would be clean
 
2012-11-29 06:10:34 PM
Welcome to Everest Resort! Our mountain offers seemingly endless options for kicking the bucket, from falling into the abyss to suffocating from lack of oxygen to being smashed by raining boulders. Start you day with a complimentary half day trip!

Enjoy your stay!
 
2012-11-29 06:10:37 PM

thisiszombocom: vernonFL: I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"

How about Danger Zones? Are they ok?


There is a highway to it.
 
2012-11-29 06:12:32 PM
Everest.. Majestic. Aloof. Forbidding. The mountain with the biggest tits in the world.

/Start again...
 
2012-11-29 06:12:35 PM

The Slush: dejavoodoo64: walkerhound: Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Why can't they just take a helicopter?

Too high:  The top of Everest is at the altitude that airliners cruise at.   Beck Weathers and Gau were barely helicoptered out.  The living and the dead usually get left behind in the "Death Zone".

Don't know if you caught Banff FF last year, but there was a movie of a sherpa and another dude who paraglided off the summit. So there's always that option.

Also, I swear I've seen this story on the farks in the past year...

I know I remember one that was a mountain or woods at the base of a mountain where people wondered off to die I think. Seems like it was Japan and involved bringing dishonor to the family or being a failure, getting fired kind of stuff. IIRC they were left there also.

This place?


Yeah that's it. Thanks for the find. I must have tried to guess why it was happening. I was thinking of the weight the Japanese carry of national pride and mythology I could see someone wondering off into a quiet place like that and offing themselves. Weird and fascinating at the same time.
 
2012-11-29 06:13:51 PM
A clever climber could carry a lighter by not packing food; there's plenty of well-preserved morels on the mountain.

Seriously, though. Why do people keep doing this? It's been done with and without oxygen, so it's not like you're making history, plus the mountain is riddled with dead bodies.
 
2012-11-29 06:13:59 PM

FlashHarry: that's just... wrong.


How could you not use them as waypoints? If you're trying to get to the cave, and you know that the cave is 100 yards east of Green Boots, do you still look west after you spot him?
 
2012-11-29 06:16:57 PM
Humans are a funny lot. if I were younger and healthier and human space exploration were more of a reality, I wouldn't mind risking my life that way. I would risk any kind of death to step on a new planet or see extraterrestrial life, if it were possible. In some ways it would be an honor to be the first human eaten by alien animals, and hopefully it would be educational for others.

Yet for some reason I don't even really understand, I think mountain climbers are just about the most stupid and useless fools in the world, doing useless risky things, to get to useless places, to learn nothing because there is nothing there left to learn, and yet managing to wring some kind of bizarre, masturbatory satisfaction out of it. I bet they are incredibly dull people at heart, and probably a bit pretentious as well.

Oh well, it takes all kinds, I guess. And even if they are silly and useless, most of them end up stuck frozen to the sides of mountains where I don't have to deal with them anyway. And if I ever got my wish of space travel but died in launch, maybe my frozen orbiting corpse would look down at their frozen corpses and wave.

/I understand ambition....I just don't understand pointless ambition.
 
2012-11-29 06:17:18 PM
All this time I thought it was an ego thing.
Turns out they are a bunch of rubberneckers.
LOL.

"OOH look, there's a dead guy with green boots!!"
 
2012-11-29 06:18:07 PM
I've been watching some youtubings about David Sharp. Man, that's pretty disturbing. The guy's sitting there, still alive, and there's nothing anyone can do. Guh.
 
2012-11-29 06:18:50 PM
litterbugs
 
2012-11-29 06:22:14 PM
I have a feeling that many of those who died would gave been pretty proud to have their bodies left up there.

For these types of people, they'd rather go that route than not live and die old in a hospital bed having not done much.

My incredibly intellectually gifted scientist dad keeps on talking about how NASA is considering a program to send aging people on a one way trip to Mars to do studies over there. If it happens, he would gladly sign up.

He's absolutely serious about it.

For some people, that us REAL living.
 
2012-11-29 06:22:28 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com

I knew I should have taken that left turn at Green Boots.
 
2012-11-29 06:22:39 PM
I get that it's logistically impossible to bring the whole bodies down.

That said, for the unknowns like Green Boots, at least take a DNA sample down so that the body can be positively identified. That's the only bit of this that strikes me as disrespectful. If you're going past these corpses anyway, the means to identify them is not threatening to the climb, either up or down. Obtain a small sample and seal it.

Most folks have SOME sort of descendant or living relative to use as a match.
 
2012-11-29 06:22:46 PM

FlashHarry: that's just... wrong.


Okay, YOU go drag that dead frozen carcass down that stupid hill.

I see it as recycling. How could you pound a sign post into that rock anyway?
 
2012-11-29 06:26:24 PM
Oh, and you know what else is cool? Millions of years from now, archeologists are going to be digging up THESE bodies. These guys could be the "Lucy"s of the future!
 
2012-11-29 06:26:26 PM
That's unfortunate but that's part of the deal when you decide to do something extreme like that.

Bringing too many supplies could compromise your own survival because it's fewer people carrying more things. In this instance there IS no way to help other climbers without putting your own team at significant risk of death too.
 
rpl
2012-11-29 06:27:01 PM

rickythepenguin: [3.bp.blogspot.com image 220x276]

The body of "Green Boots," an Indian climber who died in 1996 and is believed to be Tsewang Paljor, lies near a cave that all climbers must pass on their way to the peak. Green Boots now serves as a waypoint marker that climbers use to gauge how near they are to the summit. Green Boots met his end after becoming separated from his party. He sought refuge in a mountain overhang, but to no avail. He sat there shivering in the cold until he died.


SWIPER, NO SWIPING!


Reaper, no reaping!
 
2012-11-29 06:27:11 PM
Dead bodies as way points? I wonder if they do that in Detroit?

"Yeah, just turn right at the dead gang banger and left at the little old lady with a bullet in her head. McDonald's will be on your right. If you get to the businessman with the knife in his chest, you done went too far."
 
2012-11-29 06:27:18 PM
Couldn't you just bring a cool sled or something for the ride down if you're in trouble? Yeah yeah I know, there's cliffs, rocks and other stuff. But, I certainly would rather die at the end of a thrilling saucer ride than to freeze to death.
 
2012-11-29 06:27:32 PM
Fark is about two days behind reddit on this one.
 
2012-11-29 06:28:07 PM

coco ebert: sammyk: I like adrenalin as much as the next guy, but when I am using bodies of those that have failed before me it's time to find a safer way to thrill seek.

Mountain climbing isn't about adrenalin rushes. It's a slower process and brings a different kind of satisfaction.


i know when i see the corpses of others who attempted the same hobby as me, i always am bathed in "satisfaction".
 
2012-11-29 06:28:48 PM

Canned Tamales: Humans are a funny lot. if I were younger and healthier and human space exploration were more of a reality, I wouldn't mind risking my life that way. I would risk any kind of death to step on a new planet or see extraterrestrial life, if it were possible. In some ways it would be an honor to be the first human eaten by alien animals, and hopefully it would be educational for others.

Yet for some reason I don't even really understand, I think mountain climbers are just about the most stupid and useless fools in the world, doing useless risky things, to get to useless places, to learn nothing because there is nothing there left to learn, and yet managing to wring some kind of bizarre, masturbatory satisfaction out of it. I bet they are incredibly dull people at heart, and probably a bit pretentious as well.

Oh well, it takes all kinds, I guess. And even if they are silly and useless, most of them end up stuck frozen to the sides of mountains where I don't have to deal with them anyway. And if I ever got my wish of space travel but died in launch, maybe my frozen orbiting corpse would look down at their frozen corpses and wave.

/I understand ambition....I just don't understand pointless ambition.


I'm not a climber but I love reading about climbers. I don't think it's masturbatory or bizarre or useless. I think for them it's about the process of climbing. Yes, it's nice to reach the top, but it's not about discovering something new. Instead, it's experiencing the air, the rocks, the climb, the challenge, etc. It's more experiential in some ways than goal-oriented, even though the whole enterprise is driven by the desire to climb a mountain. That's a bit philosophical, but I think the more seasoned climbers who ponder these types of things with more depth argue something similar to that.
 
2012-11-29 06:30:05 PM

FlashHarry: that's just... wrong.


If taking their bodies down would risk other people's lives, no, not really.
 
2012-11-29 06:31:05 PM
I wonder if the families of those people are offended by this or if they see it as their loved one being remembered.
 
2012-11-29 06:34:03 PM
it's not so much that people can't try to save others, it's that usually more rescuers die than the actual person needing saved

Canned Tamales: Humans are a funny lot. if I were younger and healthier and human space exploration were more of a reality, I wouldn't mind risking my life that way. I would risk any kind of death to step on a new planet or see extraterrestrial life, if it were possible. In some ways it would be an honor to be the first human eaten by alien animals, and hopefully it would be educational for others.

Yet for some reason I don't even really understand, I think mountain climbers are just about the most stupid and useless fools in the world, doing useless risky things, to get to useless places, to learn nothing because there is nothing there left to learn, and yet managing to wring some kind of bizarre, masturbatory satisfaction out of it. I bet they are incredibly dull people at heart, and probably a bit pretentious as well.

Oh well, it takes all kinds, I guess. And even if they are silly and useless, most of them end up stuck frozen to the sides of mountains where I don't have to deal with them anyway. And if I ever got my wish of space travel but died in launch, maybe my frozen orbiting corpse would look down at their frozen corpses and wave.

/I understand ambition....I just don't understand pointless ambition.


because of the challenge of pushing the human body to its limit
 
2012-11-29 06:36:08 PM
imageshack.us
 
2012-11-29 06:36:38 PM

toraque: I still don't understand this blatant disrespect for the dead....At the very least, you'd think some of the climbers coming back down could kick a corpsesicle out of the snow and ride it down like a bobsled, or just tie a bunch of garbage around it


You have a strange idea of what "respect for the dead" would mean...
 
2012-11-29 06:39:20 PM

AdamK: because of the challenge of pushing the human body to its limit


i'd have bought that for the first few, but now people in their 70's climb everest. if you're a fit dude in your 30's climbing next to a woman in her 70's, you're not really pushing the limit of the human body.
 
2012-11-29 06:44:12 PM
ScotterOtter: Couldn't you just bring a cool sled or something for the ride down if you're in trouble? Yeah yeah I know, there's cliffs, rocks and other stuff. But, I certainly would rather die at the end of a thrilling saucer ride than to freeze to death.

shiat I'm separated from the group and out of bottled oxygen in whiteout conditions (pulls out sled) LEEEEEEEEEROY JEEEEEENKINS
 
2012-11-29 06:48:18 PM

inner ted: coco ebert: sammyk: I like adrenalin as much as the next guy, but when I am using bodies of those that have failed before me it's time to find a safer way to thrill seek.

Mountain climbing isn't about adrenalin rushes. It's a slower process and brings a different kind of satisfaction.

i know when i see the corpses of others who attempted the same hobby as me, i always am bathed in "satisfaction".


On the plus side, "satisfaction" is pretty warm. You know, until it freezes.
 
2012-11-29 06:48:58 PM
God damn... that's hardcore.

Any sport where you use the people who died ahead of you as a waypoint on a map for the people behind you has got my respect.

/respect
//seriously
 
2012-11-29 06:50:36 PM

IamAwake: You have a strange idea of what "respect for the dead" would mean...


cdn.thesandtrap.com
 
2012-11-29 06:50:41 PM
1 in 4 people die on mount Everest. Well that is if you are not one of the native people who can climb it without a second thought.
 
2012-11-29 06:52:48 PM
In 2006, English climber David Sharp joined Green Boots. He stopped in the now-infamous cave to rest. His body eventually froze in place, rendering him unable to move but still alive. Over 40 climbers passed by him as he sat freezing to death. His plight might have been overlooked as passers-by assumed Sharp was the already-dead Green Boots. Eventually, some heard faint moans, realized he was still alive, and, too late, attempted to give him oxygen or help him stand.

How long can someone stay alive in that state?
 
2012-11-29 06:54:10 PM

ParallelUniverseParking: coco ebert: sammyk: I like adrenalin as much as the next guy, but when I am using bodies of those that have failed before me it's time to find a safer way to thrill seek.

Mountain climbing isn't about adrenalin rushes. It's a slower process and brings a different kind of satisfaction.

Climbing Mt. Everest must be very satisfactory
[www.bagofnothing.com image 619x340]
...if you like standing in line


F that
 
2012-11-29 06:59:55 PM

tlchwi02: AdamK: because of the challenge of pushing the human body to its limit

i'd have bought that for the first few, but now people in their 70's climb everest. if you're a fit dude in your 30's climbing next to a woman in her 70's, you're not really pushing the limit of the human body.


Not to mention the sherpas that do it over and over again...

To me it appears pointless also. I'd prefer it if people put as much time, money and energy into something that would actually make the world a better place, but if people want to kill themselves doing something I don't understand, that is their business. I assume they all know that their corpse will be left there if they die attempting this, so I am okay with that too. If you don't want to be a frozen human road sign, then don't do the climb.
 
2012-11-29 07:04:04 PM
sometimesinteresting.files.wordpress.com

"Luke, I can climb no farther."
 
2012-11-29 07:04:36 PM

Lollipop165: I have a feeling that many of those who died would gave been pretty proud to have their bodies left up there.

For these types of people, they'd rather go that route than not live and die old in a hospital bed having not done much.

My incredibly intellectually gifted scientist dad keeps on talking about how NASA is considering a program to send aging people on a one way trip to Mars to do studies over there. If it happens, he would gladly sign up.

He's absolutely serious about it.

For some people, that us REAL living.


Really? I'd be willing to bet that every one of those frozen had phenomenal regret for their decision when they were at the end and not a single fark was given about romantic notions of death. Among the things they all shared in common was, "It won't happen to me." Kids on chemo with no hair should be allowed to line the lower trails and falcon punch every climber in the gonads before they get their license to climb.
 
2012-11-29 07:06:28 PM
ONE picture, I am dissapointed
 
2012-11-29 07:08:45 PM
There are a lot of things that people do that I have no desire to do, but I can see the appeal.

Climbing Everest is not one of them. It is beyond me why anyone wants to do this.
 
2012-11-29 07:11:05 PM

lordargent: I wonder if they dropped any good loot.


make sure you kill those f*cking Rats first.
 
2012-11-29 07:11:57 PM

sid2112: ONE picture, I am dissapointed


Click the altered dimensions hyperlink, they're more.
 
2012-11-29 07:11:59 PM

naturalbornworldshaker: "Luke, I can climb no farther."


I LOL'd
 
2012-11-29 07:13:25 PM

hvilaichez: Fark is about two days behind reddit on this one.


Unless you go to r/offbeat which is two days behind fark.
 
2012-11-29 07:14:13 PM
Founder of Intrade is one of those bodies. I don't know if he's a marker but his corpse is like 50m from the summit. Left behind not only a company, but his wife and three young kids.

Because People in power are Stupid: You whiz in me Wheaties because their there.


It's kinda funny when people so obviously can't handle being wrong. The unmodified helicopter summited Everest 7 years ago (as your link showed). No doubt the person who signed that flight plan was sacked. If the Nepalese govt didn't have an enormous self-interest in stopping such flights, there would be routine flights already, obviously weather condition dependent.
 
2012-11-29 07:15:59 PM
lordargent: I wonder if they dropped any good loot.

You've been playing Borderlands 2, haven't you.
 
kth
2012-11-29 07:16:58 PM

Hoboclown: wallywam1: DrRatchet: Both Aydin Irmak and Lincoln Hall were left for dead by climbers on the way to the summit, only to be rescued (and even walk down) by others later. Beck Weathers was also prematurly given up for dead. "Well, he's alive and breathing, but ahhh he'll probably die and I have a summet to make" strikes me as a little selfish, but I am not a climber.

He was left on the way back down. His group was trapped in a blizzard and hurricane-force winds (visibility of only a few yards). Weathers was unresponsive, and the guides left him behind because they were physically unable to carry him due to thin air and difficult terrain. They felt that if they didn't push on toward shelter then the entire group was going to die.

The Beck Weathers story is pretty crazy from that day. Not sure if I consider him the most lucky or least lucky.


I've read most of the books about that disaster. However, I got Into Thin Air on CD for my commute. Somehow it was so. much. worse. hearing the story out loud.

Now I need to find Into the Void on CD.

If you like those types of books (as I do), one that I highly recommend is Deep Survival. There are some farked up stories on there (including the author's).
 
2012-11-29 07:18:19 PM

hvilaichez: Fark is about two days behind reddit on this one.


DAMN!! I really could have used this information two days ago! Oh, the time, the money...the lives that would have been saved if only I knew this two days ago!!
 
2012-11-29 07:20:07 PM

naturalbornworldshaker: [sometimesinteresting.files.wordpress.com image 511x333]

"Luke, I can climb no farther."


Heheh, I thought of Vader too when I saw that, but couldn't think of a funny. Well done.
 
2012-11-29 07:23:27 PM

naturalbornworldshaker: [sometimesinteresting.files.wordpress.com image 511x333]

"Luke, I can climb no farther."


Wow, that was so terrible. And I laughed SO HARD.
 
2012-11-29 07:24:52 PM
Maybe if Green Boots hadn't worn his ski boots he would have made it down the mountain in one piece.
 
2012-11-29 07:28:03 PM

lordargent: I wonder if they dropped any good loot.


I could never resist rooting through corpses. Take it all, sell it all... profit!
 
2012-11-29 07:34:11 PM
Can't they just roll the bodies downhill and let gravity do the rest?
 
2012-11-29 07:35:08 PM
non climbers just do not understand and will never understand. They think its callous to leave the bodies up there they just dont know.

in 2010, magyal sherpa led a team of sherpas on mount everest to remove oxygen bottles three bodies from the death zone.

He led a team of 20 climbers to bring down the bodies one at a time.

Good luck going up by your lonesome and bringing back a body, alive or dead, you don't know how hard it is.
 
2012-11-29 07:35:34 PM
Still better than being used as a bike rack....
 
2012-11-29 07:36:20 PM

toraque: I still don't understand this blatant disrespect for the dead. I mean, sure the other climbers can't do anything to help them, but they shouldn't just leave the dead bodies up there, considering all they'd have to do is wait until the dead guys freeze solid and then smash bits of them off with a rock, and toss them over the nearest ledges. The sherpas at the bottom could just sweep up all the bits into an urn or something. Sure, there'd probably be some parts that'd get lost in a crevice on the way down or maybe eaten by mountain goats or something but seriously, we're talking about giving these people a dignified final resting place.

At the very least, you'd think some of the climbers coming back down could kick a corpsesicle out of the snow and ride it down like a bobsled, or just tie a bunch of garbage around it-they pack their garbage out, don't they?-set the stiff on fire and lob it off the mountainside like some kind of a Viking Air Burial (bonus points if an oxygen tank explodes like a firework, of course)

We're talking basic respect for the dead, here.


you are joking....please....I invoke Poe's law
 
2012-11-29 07:38:19 PM
Your Taun Taun will freeze before you reach the first marker
 
2012-11-29 07:49:05 PM

Blushing Wall Flower: I wonder if the families of those people are offended by this or if they see it as their loved one being remembered stupid.


FTFY
 
2012-11-29 07:49:06 PM

brap: Great, now I have a farking  Greensleeves earworm.


Better than the Tom Bombadil one I caught.
 
2012-11-29 07:49:32 PM

Oldiron_79: Your Taun Taun will freeze before you reach the first marker


Then I'll see you in Hell!
 
2012-11-29 07:52:07 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: "Into thin Air", documents it rather nicely as well as a host of other books.


I watched an excellent Everest documentary several years back that was either by National Geographic or just aired by them. It detailed an expedition where people were separated from the group and how they fought to stay alive through the night while others nearby died. It was a mix of interviews with the survivors while also profiling those who died. I Can't remember the name of it. I'm pretty sure it's not Into thin Air. Does anyone know of the doc I'm talking about?
I'd love to watch it again.
 
2012-11-29 07:58:14 PM
Low oxygen, treacherous terrain, numbing cold. Once they get past a certain point, they have to move fast or they will die.

I've done low level(13 K distance, 500 K ascention) and that was pretty difficult. Couldn't imagine doing everest. In fact the statistics used to be 10% death rate for climbers. Why people want to do something that risky is beyond me. Heck, I've walked around in some pretty mean snowstorms here in Calgary and could barely move in a few of them due to wind, snow depth and so forth. Wouldn't risk my life for a "thrill"
 
2012-11-29 07:58:15 PM
Helicopter landing on the top of Mt. Everest.
i.ytimg.com
 
kth
2012-11-29 07:58:58 PM

reverend maynard: Fear_and_Loathing: "Into thin Air", documents it rather nicely as well as a host of other books.

I watched an excellent Everest documentary several years back that was either by National Geographic or just aired by them. It detailed an expedition where people were separated from the group and how they fought to stay alive through the night while others nearby died. It was a mix of interviews with the survivors while also profiling those who died. I Can't remember the name of it. I'm pretty sure it's not Into thin Air. Does anyone know of the doc I'm talking about?
I'd love to watch it again.


It might have been the IMAX movie that Brashears was making at the time of the incident. The movie is interesting: the first and last third are the movie they meant to make, the middle third is them dropping everything and going to help the people higher up on the mountain.
 
2012-11-29 08:00:57 PM

coco ebert: Canned Tamales: Humans are a funny lot. if I were younger and healthier and human space exploration were more of a reality, I wouldn't mind risking my life that way. I would risk any kind of death to step on a new planet or see extraterrestrial life, if it were possible. In some ways it would be an honor to be the first human eaten by alien animals, and hopefully it would be educational for others.

Yet for some reason I don't even really understand, I think mountain climbers are just about the most stupid and useless fools in the world, doing useless risky things, to get to useless places, to learn nothing because there is nothing there left to learn, and yet managing to wring some kind of bizarre, masturbatory satisfaction out of it. I bet they are incredibly dull people at heart, and probably a bit pretentious as well.

Oh well, it takes all kinds, I guess. And even if they are silly and useless, most of them end up stuck frozen to the sides of mountains where I don't have to deal with them anyway. And if I ever got my wish of space travel but died in launch, maybe my frozen orbiting corpse would look down at their frozen corpses and wave.

/I understand ambition....I just don't understand pointless ambition.

I'm not a climber but I love reading about climbers. I don't think it's masturbatory or bizarre or useless. I think for them it's about the process of climbing. Yes, it's nice to reach the top, but it's not about discovering something new. Instead, it's experiencing the air, the rocks, the climb, the challenge, etc. It's more experiential in some ways than goal-oriented, even though the whole enterprise is driven by the desire to climb a mountain. That's a bit philosophical, but I think the more seasoned climbers who ponder these types of things with more depth argue something similar to that.


I believe the route to any summit is not so much up as within. Upwards to that extreme is only one direction of many to get there; For AT hikers it is North, etc.
 
2012-11-29 08:01:40 PM
I wonder how many of them were carrying cash when they expired.

*checks airline miles*
 
2012-11-29 08:03:49 PM
That sure was a lot of commas. Christ.
 
2012-11-29 08:05:44 PM

Canned Tamales: ...I just don't understand pointless ambition.


"Because it's there!"
Yeah, George Mallory said that... always inspired me, and got me asking "why not?" when I was more adventurous. If you asked me now, why I might want to go to the top of a mountain, it would really be as simple a thought as I just want to see what it looks like from way the fark up there. That'd be my motive.

/hold mah beer
//hey, watch this!
 
2012-11-29 08:05:55 PM

Canned Tamales: Humans are a funny lot. if I were younger and healthier and human space exploration were more of a reality, I wouldn't mind risking my life that way. I would risk any kind of death to step on a new planet or see extraterrestrial life, if it were possible. In some ways it would be an honor to be the first human eaten by alien animals, and hopefully it would be educational for others.

Yet for some reason I don't even really understand, I think mountain climbers are just about the most stupid and useless fools in the world, doing useless risky things, to get to useless places, to learn nothing because there is nothing there left to learn, and yet managing to wring some kind of bizarre, masturbatory satisfaction out of it. I bet they are incredibly dull people at heart, and probably a bit pretentious as well.

Oh well, it takes all kinds, I guess. And even if they are silly and useless, most of them end up stuck frozen to the sides of mountains where I don't have to deal with them anyway. And if I ever got my wish of space travel but died in launch, maybe my frozen orbiting corpse would look down at their frozen corpses and wave.

/I understand ambition....I just don't understand pointless ambition.


============

I've been saying the same thing for years. At this point, the government of Nepal should declare the thing off limits to anyone except legitimate scientists. Of course that would happen because there is too much money involved.
 
2012-11-29 08:06:03 PM

Mutt Farkinov: Lollipop165: I have a feeling that many of those who died would gave been pretty proud to have their bodies left up there.

For these types of people, they'd rather go that route than not live and die old in a hospital bed having not done much.

My incredibly intellectually gifted scientist dad keeps on talking about how NASA is considering a program to send aging people on a one way trip to Mars to do studies over there. If it happens, he would gladly sign up.

He's absolutely serious about it.

For some people, that us REAL living.

Really? I'd be willing to bet that every one of those frozen had phenomenal regret for their decision when they were at the end and not a single fark was given about romantic notions of death. Among the things they all shared in common was, "It won't happen to me." Kids on chemo with no hair should be allowed to line the lower trails and falcon punch every climber in the gonads before they get their license to climb.


Painting these people with some broad strokes, are we? I'm seeing a lot of stereotypes in this thread.

As for Lollipop165, go find someone who has had a close relative live with dementia for a long period of time. While you may think your dad is crazy, think about the choice that he's making. He could live out the rest of his life and die the natural method. Sure, he may get a peaceful death and get to say his goodbyes to everyone. There's the risky that his health (mental and/or physical) deteriorates enough that he becomes a burden on yourself or any siblings you may have. Lots of unknown and variables in there. However, he could choose the known option of getting to say good-bye to his loved ones and participate in something he clearly believes in, eliminating any risk of becoming a burden on said loved ones. Does that decision really sound that crazy?
 
2012-11-29 08:07:39 PM
Apparently mountain climbers are aholes.
 
2012-11-29 08:18:20 PM
On the North Face of the Eigerwand, in the '50s, there was the body of an Italian climber that dangled from a rope for 2 or 3 years. You could sit in the comfort of your hotel room in Kleine Scheidegg, drink in hand and gaze ghoulishly through your telescope at his swaying dessicated body, until Swiss spoilsports finally cut him down.

/always wanted to climb the Eiger
 
2012-11-29 08:18:46 PM

vernonFL: I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"


i55.photobucket.com 
The ICE... is going to BREAK!!
 
2012-11-29 08:20:00 PM

special20: Canned Tamales: ...I just don't understand pointless ambition.

"Because it's there!"
Yeah, George Mallory said that... always inspired me, and got me asking "why not?" when I was more adventurous. If you asked me now, why I might want to go to the top of a mountain, it would really be as simple a thought as I just want to see what it looks like from way the fark up there. That'd be my motive.

/hold mah beer
//hey, watch this!


Any adventure really needs no more inspiration than that of adventure. Being acutely in the moment, paying attention, wandering, wondering why you are do these things, camaraderie, curiosity about yourself as well as your world...
I am always somewhat disappointed by the view at any sought out vista- it becomes quite clear that the summit is not the goal.
 
2012-11-29 08:20:33 PM

Begoggle: vernonFL: I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"

[i55.photobucket.com image 330x224] 
The ICE... is going to BREAK!!


Walken in a winter wonderland?
 
2012-11-29 08:21:17 PM
67.18.219.83
 
2012-11-29 08:21:27 PM

Fissile: Canned Tamales: Humans are a funny lot. if I were younger and healthier and human space exploration were more of a reality, I wouldn't mind risking my life that way. I would risk any kind of death to step on a new planet or see extraterrestrial life, if it were possible. In some ways it would be an honor to be the first human eaten by alien animals, and hopefully it would be educational for others.

Yet for some reason I don't even really understand, I think mountain climbers are just about the most stupid and useless fools in the world, doing useless risky things, to get to useless places, to learn nothing because there is nothing there left to learn, and yet managing to wring some kind of bizarre, masturbatory satisfaction out of it. I bet they are incredibly dull people at heart, and probably a bit pretentious as well.

Oh well, it takes all kinds, I guess. And even if they are silly and useless, most of them end up stuck frozen to the sides of mountains where I don't have to deal with them anyway. And if I ever got my wish of space travel but died in launch, maybe my frozen orbiting corpse would look down at their frozen corpses and wave.

/I understand ambition....I just don't understand pointless ambition.

============

I've been saying the same thing for years. At this point, the government of Nepal should declare the thing off limits to anyone except legitimate scientists. Of course that would happen because there is too much money involved.


The first guy mentioned on the list, David Sharp, was passed by the first double amputee to summit Everest (Mark Inglis) on his ascent. However, Inglis and his team decided that Sharp was beyond saving and decided to continue with his ascent, as opposed to abandoning it for the sake of possibly saving Mr. Sharp. I'll let you read about what exactly happened or has been stated that happened, but one could make the argument that his ambition to become the first double amputee to summit Everest caused him to leave a man, who may have been rescuable, for dead.

Still feel like being the first to do something isn't a "pointless" ambition?
 
2012-11-29 08:21:50 PM

thisiszombocom: vernonFL: I try to keep myself out of places called "The Death Zone"

How about Danger Zones? Are they ok?


coreydemoss.files.wordpress.com

Are they not?
 
2012-11-29 08:23:04 PM
"His body eventually froze in place, rendering him unable to move but still alive"

Why was this never on a "100 ways to die"
 
2012-11-29 08:27:38 PM

Bacontastesgood: Founder of Intrade is one of those bodies. I don't know if he's a marker but his corpse is like 50m from the summit. Left behind not only a company, but his wife and three young kids.


Those are my favorite. Like Rob Hall: "Gee, I have a pregnant wife, so I'm going to go climb a really big farking rock that A) I've already climbed four times and B) will still be there after my child is grown up and doesn't need her dad so much any more. What could possibly go wrong?"

And yes, I know it was because he was going back to help another climber that disobeyed the order to turn around because it was past the cutoff time. Doesn't mean that there were two other people whose lives he should have put first.
 
2012-11-29 08:27:54 PM
These fellas have an interesting story too.
Touching the Void
/it's about the two British lads who both nearly periled in the Andes.
 
2012-11-29 08:33:52 PM
This insufferable cock nearly made Everest beyond the limit unwatchable. Crappy crappy human.

media.super.cz
 
2012-11-29 08:36:07 PM

pissedoffmick: This insufferable cock nearly made Everest beyond the limit unwatchable. Crappy crappy human.

[media.super.cz image 538x693]


THIS

He single handily made me hate reality tv
 
2012-11-29 08:50:26 PM
so I take it its to much effort to bring them back down?
 
2012-11-29 08:54:23 PM
$25,000-$40,000 to blow on this meaningless ego trip, not counting your gear and prior training and other expeditions?

No sympathy, derpsicle.
 
2012-11-29 08:57:45 PM
Wow, when global warming starts thawing the dead bodies out, Everest is going to STINK.
 
2012-11-29 08:57:47 PM

lordjupiter: $25,000-$40,000 to blow on this meaningless ego trip, not counting your gear and prior training and other expeditions?


It's cheaper if you're an actual climber and don't need someone to guide you up there. Also actual climbers can just avoid the busy routes, well the busy route up from Nepal. The next busiest route is nowhere near as busy.
 
2012-11-29 09:01:46 PM

Doogled: but one could make the argument that his ambition to become the first double amputee to summit Everest caused him to leave a man, who may have been rescuable, for dead.


It's an argument a lot of full time climbers have made, that passing someone on the way up and not assisting is indefensible. You can always try for the summit again a few days later. The person may not have but a few hours left if you don't help them. And there's a long history of climbers giving up climbs to save someone. Plenty of climbers who've gone back to a mountain because the previous time they ended up not making it to the summit because they had to help save someone and then the weather got bad or the season ended.
 
2012-11-29 09:02:58 PM
Kanemano: If each climber picked up a bone and an empty O2 Bottle on the way down the mountain would be clean

Aren't the bodies too cold to decompose at a normal rate?
 
2012-11-29 09:06:12 PM

DrRatchet: Both Aydin Irmak and Lincoln Hall were left for dead by climbers on the way to the summit, only to be rescued (and even walk down) by others later. Beck Weathers was also prematurly given up for dead. "Well, he's alive and breathing, but ahhh he'll probably die and I have a summet to make" strikes me as a little selfish, but I am not a climber.


It's physically impossible for all but perhaps a few sherpas to carry a body down from the dead zone. It's all most climbers can do to keep one foot in front of the other. The only way you can save a climber high on Everest is to convince them to turn around before they are too drained and hypoxic to make it on their own, and for most of them they must have enough O2 left to get back to high camp.
 
2012-11-29 09:15:27 PM

robodog: The only way you can save a climber high on Everest is to convince them to turn around before they are too drained and hypoxic to make it on their own, and for most of them they must have enough O2 left to get back to high camp.


A lot of ITGs here don't seem to get that.

"If -I- were up on that mountain, I would have slung that guy and his gear over my shoulder and carried him down MYSELF!
 
2012-11-29 09:17:08 PM

Doogled: Mutt Farkinov: Lollipop165: I have a feeling that many of those who died would gave been pretty proud to have their bodies left up there.

For these types of people, they'd rather go that route than not live and die old in a hospital bed having not done much.

My incredibly intellectually gifted scientist dad keeps on talking about how NASA is considering a program to send aging people on a one way trip to Mars to do studies over there. If it happens, he would gladly sign up.

He's absolutely serious about it.

For some people, that us REAL living.

Really? I'd be willing to bet that every one of those frozen had phenomenal regret for their decision when they were at the end and not a single fark was given about romantic notions of death. Among the things they all shared in common was, "It won't happen to me." Kids on chemo with no hair should be allowed to line the lower trails and falcon punch every climber in the gonads before they get their license to climb.

Painting these people with some broad strokes, are we? I'm seeing a lot of stereotypes in this thread.

As for Lollipop165, go find someone who has had a close relative live with dementia for a long period of time. While you may think your dad is crazy, think about the choice that he's making. He could live out the rest of his life and die the natural method. Sure, he may get a peaceful death and get to say his goodbyes to everyone. There's the risky that his health (mental and/or physical) deteriorates enough that he becomes a burden on yourself or any siblings you may have. Lots of unknown and variables in there. However, he could choose the known option of getting to say good-bye to his loved ones and participate in something he clearly believes in, eliminating any risk of becoming a burden on said loved ones. Does that decision really sound that crazy?


I'm not sure what you read in Lollipop 165's post, but it does seem we both read something different in it. It's not my business what another person does with their life and if they end it doing something arguably foolish is their own business. Go ahead and Google Ranger Nick Hall Mt. Ranier, though
 
2012-11-29 09:18:56 PM

lordargent: Kanemano: If each climber picked up a bone and an empty O2 Bottle on the way down the mountain would be clean

Aren't the bodies too cold to decompose at a normal rate?


it looks like anything exposed is stripped to the bone, no idea about the rest of the tissue. The air temp seems to range between -30 and -2 F, and thw wind... the actual jet stream often blows over the Himalayan mountains, and apparently the wind speed on everest might get up to 175mph, although most climbers wait until the wind is below 35mph to summit.

www.nws.noaa.gov
 
2012-11-29 09:21:48 PM
I'm drawn to mountain sports...skiing and mountain biking. I'm not a climber, but if I were I don't think I'd ever climb a mountain that I wouldn't have a good chance of surviving a night on if I got tired or lost.
 
2012-11-29 09:27:07 PM

Mutt Farkinov: Doogled: Mutt Farkinov: Lollipop165: I have a feeling that many of those who died would gave been pretty proud to have their bodies left up there.

For these types of people, they'd rather go that route than not live and die old in a hospital bed having not done much.

My incredibly intellectually gifted scientist dad keeps on talking about how NASA is considering a program to send aging people on a one way trip to Mars to do studies over there. If it happens, he would gladly sign up.

He's absolutely serious about it.

For some people, that us REAL living.

Really? I'd be willing to bet that every one of those frozen had phenomenal regret for their decision when they were at the end and not a single fark was given about romantic notions of death. Among the things they all shared in common was, "It won't happen to me." Kids on chemo with no hair should be allowed to line the lower trails and falcon punch every climber in the gonads before they get their license to climb.

Painting these people with some broad strokes, are we? I'm seeing a lot of stereotypes in this thread.

As for Lollipop165, go find someone who has had a close relative live with dementia for a long period of time. While you may think your dad is crazy, think about the choice that he's making. He could live out the rest of his life and die the natural method. Sure, he may get a peaceful death and get to say his goodbyes to everyone. There's the risky that his health (mental and/or physical) deteriorates enough that he becomes a burden on yourself or any siblings you may have. Lots of unknown and variables in there. However, he could choose the known option of getting to say good-bye to his loved ones and participate in something he clearly believes in, eliminating any risk of becoming a burden on said loved ones. Does that decision really sound that crazy?

I'm not sure what you read in Lollipop 165's post, but it does seem we both read something different in it. It's not my business w ...


Sorry, fat fingers and typing on a tablet...it's not my business to tell someone they can't risk their life for a purely elective challenge, but do a google search for Ranger Nick Hall and you might read some evidence that their thrill sometimes costs someone else's life.

The primal drive to live is not necessarily painting with a broad brush, nor would it be to say that said drive is more powerful at the time of someone's mortality than a romanticized concept of, "at least I am dying doing something I love."
 
2012-11-29 09:28:00 PM
George Mallory's remains were largely intact when they were found 75 years after his death. 
 
2012-11-29 09:28:40 PM

kth: reverend maynard: Fear_and_Loathing: "Into thin Air", documents it rather nicely as well as a host of other books.

I watched an excellent Everest documentary several years back that was either by National Geographic or just aired by them. It detailed an expedition where people were separated from the group and how they fought to stay alive through the night while others nearby died. It was a mix of interviews with the survivors while also profiling those who died. I Can't remember the name of it. I'm pretty sure it's not Into thin Air. Does anyone know of the doc I'm talking about?
I'd love to watch it again.

It might have been the IMAX movie that Brashears was making at the time of the incident. The movie is interesting: the first and last third are the movie they meant to make, the middle third is them dropping everything and going to help the people higher up on the mountain.


Don't think that's it, but thanks all the same. It looks interesting as well and I plan on watching it. I found it here on vimeo if anyone else is interested.
 
2012-11-29 09:33:01 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: George Mallory's remains were largely intact when they were found 75 years after his death.


I still don't know how they found the injury on his forehead, when his head was well buried in the shale....
 
2012-11-29 09:34:17 PM

Doogled: Fissile: Canned Tamales: Humans are a funny lot. if I were younger and healthier and human space exploration were more of a reality, I wouldn't mind risking my life that way. I would risk any kind of death to step on a new planet or see extraterrestrial life, if it were possible. In some ways it would be an honor to be the first human eaten by alien animals, and hopefully it would be educational for others.

Yet for some reason I don't even really understand, I think mountain climbers are just about the most stupid and useless fools in the world, doing useless risky things, to get to useless places, to learn nothing because there is nothing there left to learn, and yet managing to wring some kind of bizarre, masturbatory satisfaction out of it. I bet they are incredibly dull people at heart, and probably a bit pretentious as well.

Oh well, it takes all kinds, I guess. And even if they are silly and useless, most of them end up stuck frozen to the sides of mountains where I don't have to deal with them anyway. And if I ever got my wish of space travel but died in launch, maybe my frozen orbiting corpse would look down at their frozen corpses and wave.

/I understand ambition....I just don't understand pointless ambition.

============

I've been saying the same thing for years. At this point, the government of Nepal should declare the thing off limits to anyone except legitimate scientists. Of course that would happen because there is too much money involved.

The first guy mentioned on the list, David Sharp, was passed by the first double amputee to summit Everest (Mark Inglis) on his ascent. However, Inglis and his team decided that Sharp was beyond saving and decided to continue with his ascent, as opposed to abandoning it for the sake of possibly saving Mr. Sharp. I'll let you read about what exactly happened or has been stated that happened, but one could make the argument that his ambition to become the first double amputee to summit Everest caused h ...


Actually, I was saying that I DO in fact think that being "first" just to be first, or taking unnecessary risks for no reason IS pretty much pointless. Even though there are some things that I find interesting enough to try, I would actually hope there would be a greater reason for doing them than "just because", or for some minor internal perspective shift that would never benefit anyone or achieve anything.

Personally, I couldn't give two shiats what some douchebag amputee chooses to do to feel all powerful and cool and empowered or whatever the fark. On the one hand, Sharp knew the risks, and has no right to expect others to save him. On the other, the amputee and his crew might have saved a life but didn't. In almost any other situation, that would make him a complete douchebag, and I don't think his ambitions or achievements change that assessment much..

Sounds like a couple of absolutely, completely, and totally useless wastes of air to me, but then, I'm "not a climber", and I don't find their idiotic quests interesting at all except in a morbidly curious sense, like watching lemmings jump to their deaths.
 
2012-11-29 09:35:49 PM
images.nationalgeographic.com 

Ummm... Hi, guyz. Over here! Been waiting a long time.
 
2012-11-29 09:36:28 PM

octopied: Fear_and_Loathing: George Mallory's remains were largely intact when they were found 75 years after his death.

I still don't know how they found the injury on his forehead, when his head was well buried in the shale....


www.rei.com
 
2012-11-29 09:38:34 PM

Thisbymaster: 1 in 4 people die on mount Everest. Well that is if you are not one of the native people who can climb it without a second thought.


So there are 1.5 billion people dead on Mt Everest?
 
2012-11-29 09:38:34 PM

Spanky_McFarksalot: so I take it its to much effort to bring them back down?


I think it probably focuses the mind of the current climbers, reminding them that this is a very serious game they're engaged in. So, leaving them there probably serves a safety purpose.
 
2012-11-29 09:42:40 PM
7minutemiles.com
 
2012-11-29 09:48:07 PM
Sherpas are very, very superstitious/religious/wary of the dead. They are not, in a general sense, willing to be part of any operation that involves moving the dead. There are other aspects of Sherpa culture involved with sacrifices made (in terms of behavior, not....living things) that are done to appease the mountains. Essentially, what I understand, is that the Sherpas believe that if you piss off the mountain, you die, and they don't want to further anger the mountain by trying to take you back. Anyone who knows otherwise, jump in.

I understand mountain climbing. I live in Colorado, and I regularly head out alone to camp out and climb one. It's an amazing experience to be on a summit.

That being said, I'm not reckless or stupid. If I'm going alone, I tend to stick to well-traveled routes. I always carry a GPS communicator. People know my routes. Mountains are no joke, and I'm very much aware of the ones that are beyond my abilities. A lot of people die in the mountains. That being said, I have ZERO interest in climbing Everest. The commercialization of the climb means that basically anyone with enough money is allowed on the mountain, with the end result being many, many people that are waaaaayyyyy beyond their limit. They end up limping along because they pay for the support services - how many of these people would actually be able to make it up (and down!!) under their own steam, without supplemental oxygen and Sherpa support?

I know my limits. There's a reason I stick to class III climbs. I have no business being beyond that, and I'm not willing to take stupid risks just to summit a mountain. I've turned back before, and have never regretted it.
 
2012-11-29 09:54:35 PM

netringer: [images.nationalgeographic.com image 600x398] 

Ummm... Hi, guyz. Over here! Been waiting a long time.


Now THAT would be the ultimate...

"Oh, you climbed Everest as an amputee? Well, aren't you special! Let me tell you about how I was the first to do it with no clothes..."
 
2012-11-29 09:55:56 PM
I'd hit it!
 
2012-11-29 09:56:27 PM

Mutt Farkinov: netringer: [images.nationalgeographic.com image 600x398] 

Ummm... Hi, guyz. Over here! Been waiting a long time.

Now THAT would be the ultimate...

"Oh, you climbed Everest as an amputee? Well, aren't you special! Let me tell you about how I was the first to do it with no clothes..."


Plus if you we're going to freeze and die, you could do it in a manner that forces everyone on the trail to look at your junk for the rest of time.
 
2012-11-29 09:58:17 PM
ts2.mm.bing.net

Death isn't the handicap it used to be in the olden
days. It doesn't screw your career up like it used to.
 
2012-11-29 10:02:23 PM

Spanky_McFarksalot: so I take it its to much effort to bring them back down?


More likely it's too expensive. To get even one body down from that altitude you'd need a dedicated team, probably 4 climbers minimum, plus support staff at base camp, tents, ropes and climbing gear, hundreds of O2 bottles, climbing permits, 6 weeks worth of food for everyone, etc. The cost would be $100k at least. And worst of all you'd be risking the lives of the climbers doing the work in the process.
 
2012-11-29 10:04:17 PM

Canned Tamales: Canned Tamales: Humans are a funny lot. if I were younger and healthier and human space exploration were more of a reality, I wouldn't mind risking my life that way. I would risk any kind of death to step on a new planet or see extraterrestrial life, if it were possible. In some ways it would be an honor to be the first human eaten by alien animals, and hopefully it would be educational for others.

Yet for some reason I don't even really understand, I think mountain climbers are just about the most stupid and useless fools in the world, doing useless risky things, to get to useless places, to learn nothing because there is nothing there left to learn, and yet managing to wring some kind of bizarre, masturbatory satisfaction out of it. I bet they are incredibly dull people at heart, and probably a bit pretentious as well.

Oh well, it takes all kinds, I guess. And even if they are silly and useless, most of them end up stuck frozen to the sides of mountains where I don't have to deal with them anyway. And if I ever got my wish of space travel but died in launch, maybe my frozen orbiting corpse would look down at their frozen corpses and wave.

/I understand ambition....I just don't understand pointless ambition.


So...you're calling all mountain climbers useless risk takers? I hike rather steep mountains for exercise and fun (and most of Everest is hiking, it just heavily utilizes climbing equipment because of poor traction in the snow). Right now hiking mountains is a fairly safe and exciting sport in my neck of the woods and the benefits generally outweigh the risks. So long as a person is fairly fit and conditioned for their respective hike and has the proper equipment, sore muscles are the major risk factor. And, yes, I do take pleasure in completing a technical hike/climb on a relatively mean looking mountain when I know most humans can't be troubled to get off their asses to take a walk.

If you think all risk taking is stupid, then most exercise is off the books, but consider that being fat, sedentary and generally life-avoidant increases one's risks of all sorts of nasty diseases as well.

There are indeed limits to my risk-taking, generally whenever the risks of an activity far outweigh its benefits, so no, I never want to hike Everest. It's just stupid to lump all mountain climbers/hikers/outdoor enthusiasts together.
 
2012-11-29 10:06:29 PM

moxiecola: Sherpas are very, very superstitious/religious/wary of the dead. They are not, in a general sense, willing to be part of any operation that involves moving the dead. There are other aspects of Sherpa culture involved with sacrifices made (in terms of behavior, not....living things) that are done to appease the mountains. Essentially, what I understand, is that the Sherpas believe that if you piss off the mountain, you die, and they don't want to further anger the mountain by trying to take you back. Anyone who knows otherwise, jump in.

I understand mountain climbing. I live in Colorado, and I regularly head out alone to camp out and climb one. It's an amazing experience to be on a summit.

That being said, I'm not reckless or stupid. If I'm going alone, I tend to stick to well-traveled routes. I always carry a GPS communicator. People know my routes. Mountains are no joke, and I'm very much aware of the ones that are beyond my abilities. A lot of people die in the mountains. That being said, I have ZERO interest in climbing Everest. The commercialization of the climb means that basically anyone with enough money is allowed on the mountain, with the end result being many, many people that are waaaaayyyyy beyond their limit. They end up limping along because they pay for the support services - how many of these people would actually be able to make it up (and down!!) under their own steam, without supplemental oxygen and Sherpa support?

I know my limits. There's a reason I stick to class III climbs. I have no business being beyond that, and I'm not willing to take stupid risks just to summit a mountain. I've turned back before, and have never regretted it.


I hear you on the no regrets, the first time I climbed Whitney I became hypoxic after eating dinner (digestion takes oxygen away from the brain) and had to descend to below the tree line. It turned out it was probably very fortunate because while climbing down we came across a father and two sons who were in shorts and tshirts (it was in the mid to low 30's) without proper boots or a light. They were stuck at a technical section of the trail. We lit up the section with our headlamps and a couple spare flashlights and let them keep the lights. Despite not summiting that trip it's still one of my favorite hikes.
 
2012-11-29 10:09:21 PM

Mutt Farkinov: Mutt Farkinov:
Now THAT would be the ultimate...

"Oh, you climbed Everest as an amputee? Well, aren't you special! Let me tell you about how I was the first to do it with no clothes..."

Plus if you we're going to freeze and die, you could do it in a manner that forces everyone on the trail to look at your junk for the rest of time.


As I remember the story, when he was first discovered and nobody realized how old he was, the first thing some wisenheimer did was chop off his willie.
 
2012-11-29 10:10:39 PM

sammyk: coco ebert: sammyk: I like adrenalin as much as the next guy, but when I am using bodies of those that have failed before me it's time to find a safer way to thrill seek.

Mountain climbing isn't about adrenalin rushes. It's a slower process and brings a different kind of satisfaction.

I know. I climbed this one many years ago. It's a lot more cerebral than say bungie jumping or racing fast cars but it still an adrenalin rush. 

[www.wildlandart.com image 540x360]


More cerebral than racing cars? You've obviously not driven a car on a track in any sort of high performance endeavor.
 
2012-11-29 10:14:13 PM
If I was climbing Everest, I would totally bring my guitar so that if I were going to die, I could spend eternity frozen in the middle of my last shred.
 
2012-11-29 10:26:27 PM

Lollipop165: I have a feeling that many of those who died would gave been pretty proud to have their bodies left up there.

For these types of people, they'd rather go that route than not live and die old in a hospital bed having not done much.

My incredibly intellectually gifted scientist dad keeps on talking about how NASA is considering a program to send aging people on a one way trip to Mars to do studies over there. If it happens, he would gladly sign up.

He's absolutely serious about it.

For some people, that us REAL living.


images.art.com

First thing I thought of, never saw the film.
 
2012-11-29 10:29:56 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: "Into thin Air", documents it rather nicely as well as a host of other books.


Into Thin Air is a pile of shiat. Krakauer should never be allowed to write another word again.

Fear_and_Loathing: Anatoli Boukreev: Wrote an interesting rubuttal to "Into Thin Air."


Anatoli was a climber. Krakauer has no business being considered even remotely as an equal to Boukreev. He didn't write an "interesting rebuttal" so much as he wrote what happened from a climber's point of view. Considering Boukreev was blamed as one of the primary reasons this tragedy occurred, he really had very little choice in defending himself.

reverend maynard: kth: reverend maynard: Fear_and_Loathing: "Into thin Air", documents it rather nicely as well as a host of other books.

I watched an excellent Everest documentary several years back that was either by National Geographic or just aired by them. It detailed an expedition where people were separated from the group and how they fought to stay alive through the night while others nearby died. It was a mix of interviews with the survivors while also profiling those who died. I Can't remember the name of it. I'm pretty sure it's not Into thin Air. Does anyone know of the doc I'm talking about?
I'd love to watch it again.

It might have been the IMAX movie that Brashears was making at the time of the incident. The movie is interesting: the first and last third are the movie they meant to make, the middle third is them dropping everything and going to help the people higher up on the mountain.

Don't think that's it, but thanks all the same. It looks interesting as well and I plan on watching it. I found it here on vimeo if anyone else is interested.


KTH is talking about "Everest: Into the Death Zone". Watch it, it's good.
 
2012-11-29 10:33:56 PM
The only reason I'd climb Everest is so that I could put party hats on all the dead bodies.

Make the whole place a little bit more festive.
 
2012-11-29 10:37:21 PM

Your Average Witty Fark User: Anatoli was a climber. Krakauer has no business being considered even remotely as an equal to Boukreev. He didn't write an "interesting rebuttal" so much as he wrote what happened from a climber's point of view. Considering Boukreev was blamed as one of the primary reasons this tragedy occurred, he really had very little choice in defending himself.


I totaly agree with all of that.
 
2012-11-29 10:46:44 PM
New Business Idea:

Have a service that helicopters the dead up the Everest to serve as landmarks for others.

Options include:
1. Full face exposure to scare people (we can even put fake eyeballs in so when you slowly rot you're still looking at all of the passers by)
2. whacky poses (e.g. I wanna be humping my dog in an ice cave while giving a thumbs up to passers by)
3. The leisure death (we take put you in a wife beater and boxers and put you an a lazy-boy with a tv in front of you to make it look like you died not giving a crap about the mountain)
4. group scenes (cannibals? murder/suicide scenes? we got you covered) 

/I am already counting the money
 
2012-11-29 10:47:42 PM
I understand that this is how they are directing tourists in Chicago these days.
 
2012-11-29 10:53:07 PM

JesusJuice: A clever climber could carry a lighter by not packing food; there's plenty of well-preserved morels on the mountain.

Seriously, though. Why do people keep doing this? It's been done with and without oxygen, so it's not like you're making history, plus the mountain is riddled with dead bodies.


Why do people strive to finish a marathon or bowl a perfect game? After all, it's not like it hasn't been done before.
 
2012-11-29 10:54:45 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: Because People in power are Stupid: Why can't they just take a helicopter?

Too high:  The top of Everest is at the altitude that airliners cruise at.   Beck Weathers and Gau were barely helicoptered out.  The living and the dead usually get left behind in the "Death Zone".


content9.flixster.com

Familiar with the 'Death Zone'.

Love this guy. He should've played Bob Lee Swagger in 'Shooter'.
 
2012-11-29 10:58:52 PM

Fear_and_Loathing: Your Average Witty Fark User: Anatoli was a climber. Krakauer has no business being considered even remotely as an equal to Boukreev. He didn't write an "interesting rebuttal" so much as he wrote what happened from a climber's point of view. Considering Boukreev was blamed as one of the primary reasons this tragedy occurred, he really had very little choice in defending himself.

I totaly agree with all of that.


Krakauer was right though, Boukreev was working for those people he was taking up. While he might not have been able to save them from being caught in the blizzard, I think a lot of blame would have been put off if he'd not been going for a no extra oxygen climb. You do those kinds of things when you don't have responsibilities. And maybe he wouldn't have been so blitzed by the climb that he could have stayed out and helped those people down faster so they wouldn't have been caught in the blizzard in the first place.
 
2012-11-29 11:14:20 PM

reverend maynard: Fear_and_Loathing: "Into thin Air", documents it rather nicely as well as a host of other books.

I watched an excellent Everest documentary several years back that was either by National Geographic or just aired by them. It detailed an expedition where people were separated from the group and how they fought to stay alive through the night while others nearby died. It was a mix of interviews with the survivors while also profiling those who died. I Can't remember the name of it. I'm pretty sure it's not Into thin Air. Does anyone know of the doc I'm talking about?
I'd love to watch it again.


That sounds an awful lot like "Storm Over Everest" which was a PBS documentary but probably also aired on National Geographic. It's about the same storm Krakauer wrote about, but it's not 'Into Thin Air." It's a different documentary altogether.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/everest/

It's on iTunes, if you're interested.
 
2012-11-29 11:18:39 PM

kth: reverend maynard: Fear_and_Loathing: "Into thin Air", documents it rather nicely as well as a host of other books.

I watched an excellent Everest documentary several years back that was either by National Geographic or just aired by them. It detailed an expedition where people were separated from the group and how they fought to stay alive through the night while others nearby died. It was a mix of interviews with the survivors while also profiling those who died. I Can't remember the name of it. I'm pretty sure it's not Into thin Air. Does anyone know of the doc I'm talking about?
I'd love to watch it again.

It might have been the IMAX movie that Brashears was making at the time of the incident. The movie is interesting: the first and last third are the movie they meant to make, the middle third is them dropping everything and going to help the people higher up on the mountain.


It was indeed the IMAX movie, entitled simple Everest. Good film.
 
2012-11-29 11:18:40 PM

reverend maynard: It looks interesting as well and I plan on watching it. I found it here on vimeo if anyone else is interested.


Hey thanks for posting that! Folks had mentioned it and I had really wanted to see it!
 
2012-11-29 11:18:57 PM
www.mount-everest.net
 
2012-11-29 11:21:04 PM

nytmare: How many climbers don't die? Because 200 dead and 100 alive would be a problem, but if 200 die, and 100000 climb successfully, then you have a bigger chance of dying in a car crash.


In 86 years, the average was 1.3 percent of climbers died, but that includes sherpas as well. That's about three times the annual rate of cancer deaths in the US, or roughly on par with the worldwide suicide rate per year.

So yes, it's risky, but it's not beyond the pale.
 
2012-11-29 11:24:04 PM

netringer: I'm the first to have a a Jack?

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 500x375]


If you're looking for a 'well done!' you're not getting one from me. That barely, and in the most remote way, ties into this thread.
 
2012-11-29 11:39:01 PM

toraque: I still don't understand this blatant disrespect for the dead. I mean, sure the other climbers can't do anything to help them, but they shouldn't just leave the dead bodies up there, considering all they'd have to do is wait until the dead guys freeze solid and then smash bits of them off with a rock, and toss them over the nearest ledges. The sherpas at the bottom could just sweep up all the bits into an urn or something. Sure, there'd probably be some parts that'd get lost in a crevice on the way down or maybe eaten by mountain goats or something but seriously, we're talking about giving these people a dignified final resting place.

At the very least, you'd think some of the climbers coming back down could kick a corpsesicle out of the snow and ride it down like a bobsled, or just tie a bunch of garbage around it-they pack their garbage out, don't they?-set the stiff on fire and lob it off the mountainside like some kind of a Viking Air Burial (bonus points if an oxygen tank explodes like a firework, of course)

We're talking basic respect for the dead, here.


You've been taking lessons from spentmiles, haven't you...

/ snicker
 
2012-11-29 11:49:39 PM
That was kind of a traumatizing article for me to read. Last winter, I was walking home (in a suburban area) in the snow when I came across the frozen body of a little poor old lady laying on the sidewalk.

At least I think she was poor. She only had three bucks and change in her purse.
 
2012-11-29 11:59:44 PM

Mutt Farkinov: Mutt Farkinov: netringer: [images.nationalgeographic.com image 600x398] 

Ummm... Hi, guyz. Over here! Been waiting a long time.

Now THAT would be the ultimate...

"Oh, you climbed Everest as an amputee? Well, aren't you special! Let me tell you about how I was the first to do it with no clothes..."

Plus if you we're going to freeze and die, you could do it in a manner that forces everyone on the trail to look at your junk for the rest of time.


Pretty sure your junk would be about as small as possible at that point.
 
2012-11-30 12:02:43 AM

shift_DAWG: That was kind of a traumatizing article for me to read. Last winter, I was walking home (in a suburban area) in the snow when I came across the frozen body of a little poor old lady laying on the sidewalk.

At least I think she was poor. She only had three bucks and change in her purse.


Well...?

....dammit, don't keep us in suspense, what happened next?
 
2012-11-30 12:09:45 AM

peasants_are_revolting: Mutt Farkinov: Mutt Farkinov: netringer: [images.nationalgeographic.com image 600x398] 

Ummm... Hi, guyz. Over here! Been waiting a long time.

Now THAT would be the ultimate...

"Oh, you climbed Everest as an amputee? Well, aren't you special! Let me tell you about how I was the first to do it with no clothes..."

Plus if you we're going to freeze and die, you could do it in a manner that forces everyone on the trail to look at your junk for the rest of time.

Pretty sure your junk would be about as small as possible at that point.


Maybe YOUR junk would be...

/oblig
//sry
///softball
 
2012-11-30 12:17:25 AM

nytmare: How many climbers don't die? Because 200 dead and 100 alive would be a problem, but if 200 die, and 100000 climb successfully, then you have a bigger chance of dying in a car crash.


219 out of about 4000. I'll stick to driving.
 
2012-11-30 12:22:52 AM

kth: Hoboclown: wallywam1: DrRatchet: Both Aydin Irmak and Lincoln Hall were left for dead by climbers on the way to the summit, only to be rescued (and even walk down) by others later. Beck Weathers was also prematurly given up for dead. "Well, he's alive and breathing, but ahhh he'll probably die and I have a summet to make" strikes me as a little selfish, but I am not a climber.

He was left on the way back down. His group was trapped in a blizzard and hurricane-force winds (visibility of only a few yards). Weathers was unresponsive, and the guides left him behind because they were physically unable to carry him due to thin air and difficult terrain. They felt that if they didn't push on toward shelter then the entire group was going to die.

The Beck Weathers story is pretty crazy from that day. Not sure if I consider him the most lucky or least lucky.

I've read most of the books about that disaster. However, I got Into Thin Air on CD for my commute. Somehow it was so. much. worse. hearing the story out loud.

Now I need to find Into the Void on CD.

If you like those types of books (as I do), one that I highly recommend is Deep Survival. There are some farked up stories on there (including the author's).


Thanks. I just downloaded a sample.
 
2012-11-30 12:25:44 AM
I watched an excellent Everest documentary several years back that was either by National Geographic or just aired by them. It detailed an expedition where people were separated from the group and how they fought to stay alive through the night while others nearby died. It was a mix of interviews with the survivors while also profiling those who died. I Can't remember the name of it. I'm pretty sure it's not Into thin Air. Does anyone know of the doc I'm talking about?
I'd love to watch it again.

Lsherm

That sounds an awful lot like "Storm Over Everest" which was a PBS documentary but probably also aired on National Geographic. It's about the same storm Krakauer wrote about, but it's not 'Into Thin Air." It's a different documentary altogether.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/everest/

It's on iTunes, if you're interested.

SirHolo

It might have been the IMAX movie that Brashears was making at the time of the incident. The movie is interesting: the first and last third are the movie they meant to make, the middle third is them dropping everything and going to help the people higher up on the mountain.

It was indeed the IMAX movie, entitled simple Everest. Good film.

I'm doing my best to watch these right now, but if it's of any help in narrowing it down before this thread dies I recalled a couple of details about the one I saw.
1) one guy who got separated from the group faces nighttime alone in nasty weather. He describes his thought process on how he tried to do anything he could to not fall asleep. He knew that if he fell asleep he'd never wake up. In the morning as the sun rose he found another member of his team had froze to death just meters from him. He later loses his toes (or possibly fingers).
2) Some guy who was sick alone in a tent got left for dead by the rest of his team on the decent. The last guy heading down turned back when he thought he heard something. He checked back into the tent and saw that the guy was still alive, thus saving his life.
I was almost 10 years ago that I saw this I think, so I might be a bit off on some details.
Very, very intense documentary though. I remember thinking it one of the best I'd seen at the time.
 
2012-11-30 12:26:27 AM
You know you made it to the top when you see this guy.

www.hotflick.net
 
2012-11-30 12:29:22 AM

jeblis: nytmare: How many climbers don't die? Because 200 dead and 100 alive would be a problem, but if 200 die, and 100000 climb successfully, then you have a bigger chance of dying in a car crash.

219 out of about 4000. I'll stick to driving.


Stay away from Annapurna (38%), K2 (23%) and Nanga Parbat (22%) especially.

Link
 
2012-11-30 12:35:57 AM

special20: Canned Tamales: ...I just don't understand pointless ambition.

"Because it's there!"
Yeah, George Mallory said that... always inspired me, and got me asking "why not?" when I was more adventurous. If you asked me now, why I might want to go to the top of a mountain, it would really be as simple a thought as I just want to see what it looks like from way the fark up there. That'd be my motive.

/hold mah beer
//hey, watch this!


Yeah. I've seen the world standing on a rope ten stories above the deck of a rolling, pitching ship on the high seas, and saw some things I never would have otherwise. Why? Because I could, and no more than that. If someone asked me to do it today, I'd tell them to fark off.
 
2012-11-30 01:02:18 AM

buckler: Yeah. I've seen the world standing on a rope ten stories above the deck of a rolling, pitching ship on the high seas, and saw some things I never would have otherwise. Why? Because I could, and no more than that. If someone asked me to do it today, I'd tell them to fark off.


I would climb mountains, but the ocean?----Nooooooo. No thank you.
 
2012-11-30 01:02:24 AM

bill_01915: Spanky_McFarksalot: so I take it its to much effort to bring them back down?

More likely it's too expensive. To get even one body down from that altitude you'd need a dedicated team, probably 4 climbers minimum, plus support staff at base camp, tents, ropes and climbing gear, hundreds of O2 bottles, climbing permits, 6 weeks worth of food for everyone, etc. The cost would be $100k at least. And worst of all you'd be risking the lives of the climbers doing the work in the process.


Yeah, nobody wants to risk their neck just so they can pack a 175lb human popsicle down a mountain. If it was that easy still breathing people wouldn't be left for dead when their brain goes to mush at 28,000' +
 
2012-11-30 01:06:32 AM

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: On the North Face of the Eigerwand, in the '50s, there was the body of an Italian climber that dangled from a rope for 2 or 3 years. You could sit in the comfort of your hotel room in Kleine Scheidegg, drink in hand and gaze ghoulishly through your telescope at his swaying dessicated body, until Swiss spoilsports finally cut him down.

/always wanted to climb the Eiger




You're limping UNAUTHORIZED FINGER...
thisdistractedglobe.com
 
2012-11-30 01:12:12 AM
I knew I shoulda turned left at Abner Ravenwood!
 
2012-11-30 01:16:48 AM

reverend maynard: I'm doing my best to watch these right now, but if it's of any help in narrowing it down before this thread dies I recalled a couple of details about the one I saw.
1) one guy who got separated from the group faces nighttime alone in nasty weather. He describes his thought process on how he tried to do anything he could to not fall asleep. He knew that if he fell asleep he'd never wake up. In the morning as the sun rose he found another member of his team had froze to death just meters from him. He later loses his toes (or possibly fingers).
2) Some guy who was sick alone in a tent got left for dead by the rest of his team on the decent. The last guy heading down turned back when he thought he heard something. He checked back into the tent and saw that the guy was still alive, thus saving his life.
I was almost 10 years ago that I saw this I think, so I might be a bit off on some details.
Very, very intense documentary though. I remember thinking it one of the best I'd seen at the time.


#2 - That's Beck Weathers, so the documentary you saw was definitely about the 1996 season that Krakauer wrote about. Krakauer mentioned in his book that Weather's tent was so destroyed they figured he was dead since he was in such bad shape when he made it to camp.

If the documentary isn't "Into Thin Air", "Everest", or "Storm Over Everest" then at least you have a base to search for others. There can't be THAT many.
 
2012-11-30 01:17:33 AM
I don't get why the easy to see bodies are not removed and buried. Nowhere else would anyone of a right mind stand for that. So what the fark is wrong with climbers?
 
2012-11-30 01:26:47 AM

MDGeist: I don't get why the easy to see bodies are not removed and buried. Nowhere else would anyone of a right mind stand for that. So what the fark is wrong with climbers?


Because you live by a different set of rules in the Death Zone
 
2012-11-30 01:46:25 AM

MDGeist: I don't get why the easy to see bodies are not removed and buried. Nowhere else would anyone of a right mind stand for that. So what the fark is wrong with climbers?


Because it takes 6-10 weeks to get to them, and by the time you're there you have just enough carried oxygen to get to the top, or move the body ten feet. Logistically, it could cost the better part of $1,000,000 just to move one body to an area of the mountain where you could push it off the edge.

Imagine riding in a jet plane that loses pressure at cruising altitude. You couldn't stay awake, much less function, without the supplemental oxygen. Now imagine having to carry enough oxygen up a mountain for the express purpose of finding a body, chipping away at the ice and snow that surround it, and carrying it down. Then imagine that you're the person who has to pay for it.

The best solution is to build cairns on top of the bodies - but that takes extra oxygen, too. A lot of it, since you'd have to scour the area for rocks. So if the families aren't paying for the work, who will? Even if there was dirt on the mountain (there isn't) it's so cold you couldn't dig no matter how long you tried.

I don't fault the climbers for leaving the bodies - it's an enormous cost to do anything with them, both in money and risk.  The sherpas for cultural reasons don't like moving the bodies, and you're in an area of the earth that is almost as inhospitable for human life as being underwater.

So the bodies stay. It should be readily apparent that since the bodies don't decay normally - because bacteria, insects, plants, and wildlife also can't survive there - that traditional ideas like "burial" are a pipe dream. Those bodies may as well be on the moon.
 
2012-11-30 01:47:41 AM

hvilaichez: Fark is about two days behind reddit on this one.


Oh my god my life is a meaningless farce now. The shame.
 
2012-11-30 02:18:47 AM

Lsherm: There can't be THAT many.

lol agreed. That's why I'm so surprised I never found it. Thanks for the help. I may finally get to see this one again.
 
2012-11-30 02:22:52 AM
I have to laugh at all the people here saying they should just drag the bodies off the mountain.

Everest isn't like the black diamond run at Mammoth.
 
2012-11-30 03:05:09 AM

hlehmann: JesusJuice: A clever climber could carry a lighter by not packing food; there's plenty of well-preserved morels on the mountain.

Seriously, though. Why do people keep doing this? It's been done with and without oxygen, so it's not like you're making history, plus the mountain is riddled with dead bodies.

Why do people strive to finish a marathon or bowl a perfect game? After all, it's not like it hasn't been done before.


To beat other people. No one "wins" Everest.
 
2012-11-30 03:19:40 AM

JesusJuice: hlehmann: JesusJuice: A clever climber could carry a lighter by not packing food; there's plenty of well-preserved morels on the mountain.

Seriously, though. Why do people keep doing this? It's been done with and without oxygen, so it's not like you're making history, plus the mountain is riddled with dead bodies.

Why do people strive to finish a marathon or bowl a perfect game? After all, it's not like it hasn't been done before.

To beat other people. No one "wins" Everest.


Well, actually...they do sorta beat the frozen ones.
 
2012-11-30 03:42:24 AM
this is not news.
Nor is the fact that the trail to and the area around Everest are now a garbage dumps for abandoned crap.

A real monument to the species.
 
2012-11-30 04:33:40 AM
Same link, almost the same headline, a day earlier.

Was it because no "cool" tag?

/welcometofark.jpg
 
2012-11-30 04:41:37 AM

FlashHarry: that's just... wrong.


Kind of sick, but serves as a sobering warning I suppose
 
2012-11-30 06:42:26 AM
So it's a bit like candlepin bowling in that you leave the deadwood.
 
2012-11-30 07:06:18 AM

MDGeist: I don't get why the easy to see bodies are not removed and buried. Nowhere else would anyone of a right mind stand for that. So what the fark is wrong with climbers?


The bodies don't decompose, even over decades. What does that tell you about the environment they exist in? What does that, in turn, tell you about traditional notions of body retrieval and burial?

Start here: these bodies are frozen stiff by both temperature and rigor mortis. They weigh maybe 150-200 pounds. They may as well be logs of wood. How would you propose to move something like that off a mountainside where oxygen is 1/3rd of sea level, where the ground is frozen solid and the bodies themselves are frozen to the ground? Remember, no assistance from machinery, because you can't get it up there.

Don't you think if they could remove the bodies, they would?
 
2012-11-30 07:09:44 AM

kth: reverend maynard: Fear_and_Loathing: "Into thin Air", documents it rather nicely as well as a host of other books.

I watched an excellent Everest documentary several years back that was either by National Geographic or just aired by them. It detailed an expedition where people were separated from the group and how they fought to stay alive through the night while others nearby died. It was a mix of interviews with the survivors while also profiling those who died. I Can't remember the name of it. I'm pretty sure it's not Into thin Air. Does anyone know of the doc I'm talking about?
I'd love to watch it again.

It might have been the IMAX movie that Brashears was making at the time of the incident. The movie is interesting: the first and last third are the movie they meant to make, the middle third is them dropping everything and going to help the people higher up on the mountain.


I saw that IMAX film in the Omni theater at the Boston Science Museum. That was awesome. I wish all IMAX theaters were like that.
 
2012-11-30 07:13:19 AM

JesusJuice: hlehmann: JesusJuice: A clever climber could carry a lighter by not packing food; there's plenty of well-preserved morels on the mountain.

Seriously, though. Why do people keep doing this? It's been done with and without oxygen, so it's not like you're making history, plus the mountain is riddled with dead bodies.

Why do people strive to finish a marathon or bowl a perfect game? After all, it's not like it hasn't been done before.

To beat other people. No one "wins" Everest.


I live in Washington, U.S. I have hiked to and taken many pictures of beautiful Mt. Rainier. Why would I do that? Many other people have hiked all over that mountain, and taken better pictures than mine, so why wouldn't I just obtain and frame one of their pictures instead of expending my own effort to do the same thing?

Because those pictures aren't mine. I didn't take them. My favorite picture of Rainier is one that I took. I love it because I know I was the one standing there, taking the shot. I love it because I remember what it felt like to stand there.

People do stuff to do it for themselves. Climbing a mountain is a huge achievement. It takes extensive training and preparation, and superb execution in order to minimize risk as much as possible. It's an impressive endeavor. It's no good to point to someone else and say that they did it already - to do it for yourself is a matter of personal satisfaction.

But you wouldn't understand if you're the kind of person who takes no pride in any kind of personal endeavor. If that's the case, I pity you - you're missing something grand about life. If you take personal satisfaction in your chosen endeavor(s), then you'll understand why some people would want to climb mountains.
 
2012-11-30 07:24:08 AM
The derp is strong in here.
 
2012-11-30 07:59:47 AM

Thisbymaster: 1 in 4 people die on mount Everest. Well that is if you are not one of the native people who can climb it without a second thought.


150,000 people die every day, so that means ~13.7 million people die on Everest every year. That's much more than I would have guessed.
 
2012-11-30 08:02:38 AM
What do you call a mountain climber who just had a vasectomy?

Dry sack on the rocks.
 
2012-11-30 08:22:32 AM

Tanthalas39: The derp is strong in here.


Your mom is strong
 
2012-11-30 09:35:21 AM

WhyteRaven74: Doogled: but one could make the argument that his ambition to become the first double amputee to summit Everest caused him to leave a man, who may have been rescuable, for dead.

It's an argument a lot of full time climbers have made, that passing someone on the way up and not assisting is indefensible. You can always try for the summit again a few days later. The person may not have but a few hours left if you don't help them. And there's a long history of climbers giving up climbs to save someone. Plenty of climbers who've gone back to a mountain because the previous time they ended up not making it to the summit because they had to help save someone and then the weather got bad or the season ended.


Like this guy
 
2012-11-30 09:56:29 AM
Bodies are left where they fall on the mountain for a reason. It is understood that if you die on Everest you will be stay there for eternity, or until the moutain gives you up. (It took 75 years for Mallory's body to be discovered!) Sherpas will not touch a dead body unless it is a relative. Other climbers have died attempting to bring down the dead, especially those above Camp 4 (26,000 feet). Lower on the mountain (below Camp 3) dead climbers have been placed in sleeping bags and lowered into crevasses. You can pretty much forget trying to carry someone through the Khumbu Icefall below Camp 1, either. That is why Makalu Gau and Beck Weathers were airlifted out by Lt. Madan KC above the ice fall -- it was the second highest helicopter rescue in history at the time.

Just some info from extensive research. Hope one of you finds it useful/interesting/helpfu.
 
2012-11-30 09:59:58 AM

The Slush: Just watch out for the tattooed ones inside caves


One of my favorite books. Of. All. Time.

/shiatty sequel though
 
2012-11-30 10:23:35 AM

DrPainMD: Thisbymaster: 1 in 4 people die on mount Everest. Well that is if you are not one of the native people who can climb it without a second thought.

150,000 people die every day, so that means ~13.7 million people die on Everest every year. That's much more than I would have guessed.


That's why the mountain keeps getting higher.
 
2012-11-30 10:39:28 AM

JesusJuice: To beat other people. No one "wins" Everest.


the overwhelming majority of people who run in a marathon have absolutely no thought they'll win - they just want to complete the/a marathon.
 
2012-11-30 11:35:09 AM
The concept of being frozen to the point of being unable to move, but still alive frightens me to no end. Just stuck, waiting to die with no hope.

To be in that state and have people who could help you walk by you, abandon you or watch them fall off the mountain and die while trying to help you is even more disturbing.
 
2012-11-30 12:03:03 PM
Well at least if other climbers run out of food they have snacks available along the way.
 
2012-11-30 12:43:34 PM
At first I saw the photo and though....why hasn't anyone stolen the clothes of the deceased to stay warm. Then I realized that anyone that ill prepared was probably already a landmark.
 
2012-11-30 02:25:16 PM

Citrate1007: At first I saw the photo and though....why hasn't anyone stolen the clothes of the deceased to stay warm. Then I realized that anyone that ill prepared was probably already a landmark.


the cold is only a fraction of the problem. it may be what kills many people, but that's only after they've succumb to the problems of not having enough oxygen to function.

the bigger issue is the fact that, at that altitude, your body is burning 13,000+ calories a day just to survive and it's almost impossible to digest food (the body starts eating itself, i don't know what that means, but it doesn't sound good). it takes energy for your body to keep itself warm. so, no matter how many layers you have on, you're just insulating an under-performing husk. it's like putting more clothes around an ice cube to keep it warm. well, not really like that, but whatever
 
2012-11-30 02:50:27 PM

pute kisses like a man: but that's only after they've succumb to the problems of not having enough oxygen to function.


Yeah, cerebral edema seems to be the leading cause of deaths on the mountain. Your brain swells, you get confused, and then you sit down. Then you eventually die.

pute kisses like a man: the bigger issue is the fact that, at that altitude, your body is burning 13,000+ calories a day just to survive and it's almost impossible to digest food


Healthy fat men have an advantage on Everest, but the extra fat stores don't seem to help women, primarily because the body is burning muscle tissue and fat at the same time, and women run out of muscle tissue earlier.
 
2012-11-30 04:12:13 PM

JesusJuice: A clever climber could carry a lighter by not packing food; there's plenty of well-preserved morels on the mountain.

Seriously, though. Why do people keep doing this? It's been done with and without oxygen, so it's not like you're making history, plus the mountain is riddled with dead bodies.


Probably to experience the full breadth of life - experience all that it has to offer. Sometimes that means getting as close to the edge of death as possible. It can also mean seeing what the body is capable of enduring.
 
2012-11-30 05:25:07 PM

JungleBoogie: JesusJuice: A clever climber could carry a lighter by not packing food; there's plenty of well-preserved morels on the mountain.

Seriously, though. Why do people keep doing this? It's been done with and without oxygen, so it's not like you're making history, plus the mountain is riddled with dead bodies.

Probably to experience the full breadth of life - experience all that it has to offer. Sometimes that means getting as close to the edge of death as possible. It can also mean seeing what the body is capable of enduring.


Just drop acid, man.
 
2012-11-30 06:29:29 PM

karmachameleon: JesusJuice: hlehmann: JesusJuice: A clever climber could carry a lighter by not packing food; there's plenty of well-preserved morels on the mountain.

Seriously, though. Why do people keep doing this? It's been done with and without oxygen, so it's not like you're making history, plus the mountain is riddled with dead bodies.

Why do people strive to finish a marathon or bowl a perfect game? After all, it's not like it hasn't been done before.

To beat other people. No one "wins" Everest.

I live in Washington, U.S. I have hiked to and taken many pictures of beautiful Mt. Rainier. Why would I do that? Many other people have hiked all over that mountain, and taken better pictures than mine, so why wouldn't I just obtain and frame one of their pictures instead of expending my own effort to do the same thing?

Because those pictures aren't mine. I didn't take them. My favorite picture of Rainier is one that I took. I love it because I know I was the one standing there, taking the shot. I love it because I remember what it felt like to stand there.

People do stuff to do it for themselves. Climbing a mountain is a huge achievement. It takes extensive training and preparation, and superb execution in order to minimize risk as much as possible. It's an impressive endeavor. It's no good to point to someone else and say that they did it already - to do it for yourself is a matter of personal satisfaction.

But you wouldn't understand if you're the kind of person who takes no pride in any kind of personal endeavor. If that's the case, I pity you - you're missing something grand about life. If you take personal satisfaction in your chosen endeavor(s), then you'll understand why some people would want to climb mountains.


Hey there...couldn't help but note the tone of your post seems to be somewhat condescending. I can't refute your love of taking your own picture, nor would I begrudge you the opportunity to do so. The only problem with that is, sometimes climbers on Mt. Ranier involve more than just themselves in their pursuits. Sometimes, people die trying to rescue those looking to take their own picture...and then, what the cost? Would you say, "at least he died so that I could do what I loved?" The asshole from Waco that Nick Hall died trying to rescue off of Mt. Ranier didn't even have the decency to acknowledge that the man died tyring to save him from a failed narcissistic endeavor. Maybe that should be taken into consideration before pissing on people in forums who don't see the desire to take pictures as being innocuous as you do.
 
2012-11-30 07:30:25 PM

Mutt Farkinov: Hey there...couldn't help but note the tone of your post seems to be somewhat condescending. I can't refute your love of taking your own picture, nor would I begrudge you the opportunity to do so. The only problem with that is, sometimes climbers on Mt. Ranier involve more than just themselves in their pursuits. Sometimes, people die trying to rescue those looking to take their own picture...and then, what the cost? Would you say, "at least he died so that I could do what I loved?" The asshole from Waco that Nick Hall died trying to rescue off of Mt. Ranier didn't even have the decency to acknowledge that the man died tyring to save him from a failed narcissistic endeavor. Maybe that should be taken into consideration before pissing on people in forums who don't see the desire to take pictures as being innocuous as you do.


I don't intend to be condescending, I was just covering all the bases. I do grow tired of people who don't know what the hell they're talking about judging others. Whether that's you or anyone else, I wouldn't know, so take it as a "if the shoe fits" kind of comment.

As for people who die trying to rescue others - no one asked them to do that, any more than anyone asked a climber to climb the mountain, and they are not obligated to make the attempt. No one is. I figure if you climb mountains, you take your life into your own hands and shouldn't expect anyone else to try and help you (which is why I understand other climbers leaving people behind on Everest). If someone does decide to try and help you, that's on them. I know I'll never die doing that, because I'd never try to rescue anyone off a mountain.
 
2012-11-30 09:41:02 PM
The article fails to mention what was in their pockets.
 
2012-11-30 10:29:34 PM

karmachameleon: JesusJuice: hlehmann: JesusJuice: A clever climber could carry a lighter by not packing food; there's plenty of well-preserved morels on the mountain.

Seriously, though. Why do people keep doing this? It's been done with and without oxygen, so it's not like you're making history, plus the mountain is riddled with dead bodies.

Why do people strive to finish a marathon or bowl a perfect game? After all, it's not like it hasn't been done before.

To beat other people. No one "wins" Everest.

I live in Washington, U.S. I have hiked to and taken many pictures of beautiful Mt. Rainier. Why would I do that? Many other people have hiked all over that mountain, and taken better pictures than mine, so why wouldn't I just obtain and frame one of their pictures instead of expending my own effort to do the same thing?

Because those pictures aren't mine. I didn't take them. My favorite picture of Rainier is one that I took. I love it because I know I was the one standing there, taking the shot. I love it because I remember what it felt like to stand there.

People do stuff to do it for themselves. Climbing a mountain is a huge achievement. It takes extensive training and preparation, and superb execution in order to minimize risk as much as possible. It's an impressive endeavor. It's no good to point to someone else and say that they did it already - to do it for yourself is a matter of personal satisfaction.

But you wouldn't understand if you're the kind of person who takes no pride in any kind of personal endeavor. If that's the case, I pity you - you're missing something grand about life. If you take personal satisfaction in your chosen endeavor(s), then you'll understand why some people would want to climb mountains.


Mt. Rainier is a great mountain. Dad and I made the trek up to Camp Muir once. I'd love to summitt it someday.
 
2012-12-01 11:49:01 AM

karmachameleon: I know I'll never die doing that, because I'd never try to rescue anyone off a mountain.


(Wanted to add that's because I don't climb mountains, not because I'd pass someone by while climbing a mountain. If I saw someone in need, I'd be one of the people you might read about dying while trying to help someone else. ;-)
 
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