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(Popular Science)   Researchers use THE MOST TERRIFYING ROBOT EVER to help autistic children interact socially. (with pic of THE MOST TERRIFYING ROBOT EVER)   (popsci.com) divider line 102
    More: Interesting, no pressure, Smile for the Camera, signal processing  
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23515 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Nov 2012 at 1:07 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-29 01:53:48 PM  

oldfarthenry: Hell, we used to watch scarier ones every morning on the tube!
[i1151.photobucket.com image 481x319]


"Do YOU know where your children are?"
s12.postimage.org

Ah yes. Thanks for the memories of WKBW TV!
 
2012-11-29 02:01:06 PM  
 
2012-11-29 02:04:32 PM  

imfallen_angel: Stopped reading at:

"Yet autism is treatable"


Why? Did you miss-read that as curable?
 
2012-11-29 02:06:22 PM  

Gyrfalcon: blazemongr: Lunaville: I don't understand the apparent obsession some researchers have with trying to get autistic children to interact with robots. The children I am acquainted with, who have an autism diagnosis, interact with technology just fine. It's interacting with people that they struggle with.

Which is why the robot has a face.

Wouldn't it be better to have them interact with people? I hear those also have faces.


[citation needed]
 
2012-11-29 02:06:57 PM  
This thread is freaking me out
 
2012-11-29 02:11:05 PM  

12monkeys: Kevin72: You know what is causing the leap in autism? Aspertame in diet soft drinks drunk during pregnancy. And the GMO corn in high fructose corn syrup isn't helping.

On one hand, this totally screams out troll to me. But on the other hand, anti-GMO/HFCS nut cases are always super eager to spew their smug all-natural nonsense anywhere they can. So I'm going to have to rate it a 4/10 with the possibility of adding a point or two if you get any bites.


My theory is that more smart people are hooking up and it is the next evolutionary step. :)
Google Indigo Children

/8 year old son is an Aspie
//I probably would have been diagnosed as the same
 
2012-11-29 02:16:51 PM  
blog.lib.umn.edu
 
2012-11-29 02:20:41 PM  

Mister_poopy_pants: [media.captiontool.com image 525x510]


Dear God I read this in the gingerbread man's voice from Shrek, which made it even worse.
 
2012-11-29 02:22:46 PM  
fc06.deviantart.net
blogs.westword.com

*Ahem*
 
2012-11-29 02:26:18 PM  

imfallen_angel: Stopped reading at:

"Yet autism is treatable"

Then started to wish the heads of all concerned would assplode for being this stupid.

If it was treatable, it wouldn't exist.

Another freaking study that if anyone around me reads, will offer their "new knowledge" about my kid and how she can miraculously be "fixed".

God, how I hate these articles and so-called research.

/has autistic daughter


I think they meant that you can teach kids social skills manually. I've kind of given up on journalism lately, but this actually is a really big breakthrough, and a good one. I only have Asperger's symptoms, but if I'd had this robot as a kid it would have been my best friend forever, and I'd probably have learned face-reading much earlier.

/Don't know your daughter, so it may well not work for her, but this is a wonderful breakthrough once you get past the idiots writing it.
 
2012-11-29 02:32:13 PM  

imfallen_angel: Stopped reading at:

"Yet autism is treatable"

Then started to wish the heads of all concerned would assplode for being this stupid.

If it was treatable, it wouldn't exist.

Another freaking study that if anyone around me reads, will offer their "new knowledge" about my kid and how she can miraculously be "fixed".

God, how I hate these articles and so-called research.

/has autistic daughter


treatable != curable
 
2012-11-29 02:38:43 PM  
Overly-attached robot
 
2012-11-29 02:39:00 PM  
www.geekologie.com 
www.geekologie.com
tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com
blogs.sfweekly.com
 
2012-11-29 02:48:15 PM  

Gyrfalcon: blazemongr: Lunaville: I don't understand the apparent obsession some researchers have with trying to get autistic children to interact with robots. The children I am acquainted with, who have an autism diagnosis, interact with technology just fine. It's interacting with people that they struggle with.

Which is why the robot has a face.

Wouldn't it be better to have them interact with people? I hear those also have faces.


Wouldn't it be better for someone with a broken leg to just walk on it? I hear that's the end-goal of their physical therapy.

The robot is a step in that direction, they're already fine with machines, you give them a machine that's like (but not like) a person to interact with as training wheels or crutches until they get to where they can talk to a person.
 
2012-11-29 02:54:03 PM  
blog.waspit.me


too soon
 
2012-11-29 02:54:56 PM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: [fc06.deviantart.net image 337x500]
[blogs.westword.com image 850x361]

*Ahem*


On reflection, I wonder why Reinhardt built Max. He had already subjugated the crew, turned them into mindless cyborgs, and had a robot army with hands, so they could do more than just shoot stuff. Max was designed clearly to kill things. Did Reinhardt actually expect company, or did he just have Max randomly attack things around the ship for giggles?
 
2012-11-29 02:59:01 PM  
farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2012-11-29 03:05:33 PM  

Kevin72: You know what is causing the leap in autism?


There isn't a leap in autism, just its diagnosis. Studies applying the same diagnostic criteria across age groups show the same rates in different age groups (even elderly).

/autism parent; I follow this stuff
 
2012-11-29 03:07:59 PM  

imfallen_angel: Stopped reading at:

"Yet autism is treatable"

Then started to wish the heads of all concerned would assplode for being this stupid.

If it was treatable, it wouldn't exist.

Another freaking study that if anyone around me reads, will offer their "new knowledge" about my kid and how she can miraculously be "fixed".

God, how I hate these articles and so-called research.

/has autistic daughter


I also have one, and was heartwarmed by the researcher's insistence (after the point where you stopped reading) in not giving false hope to other parents.

/also feel your pain about the various "hey, have you heard about this?" we always get when something like this comes out
//but they mean well and generally don't press
 
2012-11-29 03:47:46 PM  

SteakMan: Why? Did you miss-read that as curable?


boarch: treatable != curable


Guess you guys miss the point of what autism is or does to a person.... and what the definition of "treatment" is (therapy used to remedy a health problem).

It's not "treatable" (nor curable, at least so far).

What they are doing is just looking at another way to find a way to communicate with some of the people from a limited spectrum of autism. It's not a treatment, as it's not fixing something to make it "work correctly".

It might help some, but I'd go more with it providing false hope to many.

I've seen this tried with puppets, dolls, images, etc. and while it can work for some semi-functional autistic people, what it is, is simply an approach to focus the handicapped person enough to get them to participate.

Treatment? nah.. this is similar to the boom in "assisted" keyboard stories from a few years back.

It's no remedy.. it's like saying that someone with a missing leg, is being "treated" by being given a wooden peg.

The reality is that with enough work, for some, they can be trained as you'd train an animal, to respond to stimulus, to understand that there's a "payment" for some behavior, punishment for others.

For them to get an autistic person to "understand", is like someone yelling in a foreign language while pointing to an object. Eventually the person can get the concept of what the person might mean, but 10 times harder.

It's not a treatment, it doesn't "alleviate" their autism.
 
2012-11-29 03:54:38 PM  

Gaseous Anomaly: I also have one, and was heartwarmed by the researcher's insistence (after the point where you stopped reading) in not giving false hope to other parents.

/also feel your pain about the various "hey, have you heard about this?" we always get when something like this comes out
//but they mean well and generally don't press


I'm glad you saw it in a different light, but I just simply am sick of seeing articles with the same re-harshed approaches that claim being new and "maybe" do something.... money wasted when it could go to better research.

And you've been lucky that the people that have approached you didn't press... I've had too many instances of people that pressed on and on, me being polite again and again until enough was enough and I simply had to tell them to fark off and give it a rest once and for all. (and since I try to be a nice person and patient about it, it's not easy)

It's a bit like on Fark with all the internet experts, but in real life and face to face.

:-p
 
2012-11-29 04:27:12 PM  
images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-11-29 04:43:49 PM  

imfallen_angel: Gaseous Anomaly: I also have one, and was heartwarmed by the researcher's insistence (after the point where you stopped reading) in not giving false hope to other parents.

/also feel your pain about the various "hey, have you heard about this?" we always get when something like this comes out
//but they mean well and generally don't press

I'm glad you saw it in a different light, but I just simply am sick of seeing articles with the same re-harshed approaches that claim being new and "maybe" do something.... money wasted when it could go to better research.

And you've been lucky that the people that have approached you didn't press... I've had too many instances of people that pressed on and on, me being polite again and again until enough was enough and I simply had to tell them to fark off and give it a rest once and for all. (and since I try to be a nice person and patient about it, it's not easy)

It's a bit like on Fark with all the internet experts, but in real life and face to face.

:-p


It's occurring to me that I need to take your pain to heart and bear it in mind. I have committed the opposite offense contending with two separate Moms that their children, diagnosed with Aspergers, should likely be celebrated rather than diagnosed. I remember one saying "Have you noticed that B. doesn't make eye contact?"
me "Yes."
The Mom "Not making eye contact is a symptom."
Instead of shutting up and dropping the subject I asked "Why does she have to make eye contact? What if she doesn't want to make eye contact?"
The Mom "People make eye contact when they communicate. They convey unspoken information that way."
me "Most people do that. Why does she have to do what most people do?" Then I babbled on with some nonsense about experts self-appointing themselves as arbiters of what is normal and not normal and why don't we just go back to beating kids who are left handed. And blah, blah, blah.

I wish I could take that back.
 
2012-11-29 04:46:13 PM  
You know what causes autism?
Internet news conglomerate sites.
 
2012-11-29 05:14:51 PM  

Gyrfalcon: blazemongr: Lunaville: I don't understand the apparent obsession some researchers have with trying to get autistic children to interact with robots. The children I am acquainted with, who have an autism diagnosis, interact with technology just fine. It's interacting with people that they struggle with.

Which is why the robot has a face.

Wouldn't it be better to have them interact with people? I hear those also have faces.


I have quite literally spent the last 6 months working on the software for a robot very similar to this one to act as an autonomous therapeutic aid or remote avatar for a therapist. The point of the robot face as opposed to that of a person is that human faces, with all our varied expressions, convey a lot of information and can easily overload a child with autism. The more simplistic, non-threatening faces are easier for the child to interact with. Additionally, because a robot can preform actions in a exact repeatable manner, many of the patients find it soothing for predictable behaviors.

imfallen_angel: If it was treatable, it wouldn't exist.


Treatment goals are to maximize the child's ability to function independently, facilitate the best possible quality of life, assist the child with socialization and educate and support the family unit.

We are not discussing cures. We're discussing ways to improve the quality of life, mitigate developmental delays and alleviate the issues they can cause in social settings.
 
2012-11-29 05:18:02 PM  
/getting a kick... etc
 
2012-11-29 05:30:05 PM  

Doc Smiley: /getting a kick... etc


You're a robot?

/10101101
 
2012-11-29 05:32:28 PM  

Rich Cream: Doc Smiley: /getting a kick... etc

You're a robot?

/10101101 10100101


FTFM
 
2012-11-29 05:44:17 PM  
A Golden Retriever and an older brother worked for us.
 
2012-11-29 05:48:21 PM  

Rich Cream: Rich Cream: Doc Smiley: /getting a kick... etc

You're a robot?

/10101101 10100101

FTFM


Cyborg, actually. Still working on engineering the meat away.
Thanks for fixing that, I would have been insulted otherwise.
 
2012-11-29 05:49:39 PM  

Doc Smiley: Gyrfalcon: blazemongr: Lunaville: I don't understand the apparent obsession some researchers have with trying to get autistic children to interact with robots. The children I am acquainted with, who have an autism diagnosis, interact with technology just fine. It's interacting with people that they struggle with.

Which is why the robot has a face.

Wouldn't it be better to have them interact with people? I hear those also have faces.

I have quite literally spent the last 6 months working on the software for a robot very similar to this one to act as an autonomous therapeutic aid or remote avatar for a therapist. The point of the robot face as opposed to that of a person is that human faces, with all our varied expressions, convey a lot of information and can easily overload a child with autism. The more simplistic, non-threatening faces are easier for the child to interact with. Additionally, because a robot can preform actions in a exact repeatable manner, many of the patients find it soothing for predictable behaviors.

imfallen_angel: If it was treatable, it wouldn't exist.

Treatment goals are to maximize the child's ability to function independently, facilitate the best possible quality of life, assist the child with socialization and educate and support the family unit.

We are not discussing cures. We're discussing ways to improve the quality of life, mitigate developmental delays and alleviate the issues they can cause in social settings.


imfallen_angel: Gaseous Anomaly: I also have one, and was heartwarmed by the researcher's insistence (after the point where you stopped reading) in not giving false hope to other parents.

/also feel your pain about the various "hey, have you heard about this?" we always get when something like this comes out
//but they mean well and generally don't press

I'm glad you saw it in a different light, but I just simply am sick of seeing articles with the same re-harshed approaches that claim being new and "maybe" do something.... money wasted when it could go to better research.

And you've been lucky that the people that have approached you didn't press... I've had too many instances of people that pressed on and on, me being polite again and again until enough was enough and I simply had to tell them to fark off and give it a rest once and for all. (and since I try to be a nice person and patient about it, it's not easy)

It's a bit like on Fark with all the internet experts, but in real life and face to face.

:-p




My little guy is sporadic with eye contact. It was pushed as an issue until our consultant said that many cultures don't see this as an issue as lack of eye contact in many countries is normal and a sign of respect.
 
2012-11-29 05:55:20 PM  

moothemagiccow: i'm sure the poor aspies won't be able to tell


Untrue for the high-functioning types; they get reduced social skills AND are prone to being creeped out by..... that, just like anyone else.

That would suck pretty bad.
 
2012-11-29 06:10:34 PM  

Some 'Splainin' To Do: Kevin72: You know what is causing the leap in autism? Aspertame in diet soft drinks drunk during pregnancy. And the GMO corn in high fructose corn syrup isn't helping.

I think you forgot to mention chemtrails.


Don't forget wifi!
 
2012-11-29 06:42:14 PM  
My Autistic son would love that! He is obsessed with eyebrows and the lack thereof. If some drawing of a face is missing them he gets excited and says it is "a kitty"

He also calls his younger sister kitty and she has eyebrows.

But the simpler face is better as he will tend to fixate on tiny details so a complex (eg human) face is too distracting.
 
2012-11-29 07:46:59 PM  

Matrix Flavored Wasabi: The scientist quoted in this article, Simon Baron-Cohen, is one of the world's leading experts on autism (I've read so many of his studies for tangentially related work) and is indeed related to Sacha Baron-Cohen. I think they're cousins or brothers, but I can't remember.


Cousins. Pretty different life courses, huh?
 
2012-11-29 08:22:49 PM  

SwissArmyGnome: [cdn.blogs.babble.com image 550x332]

/black is traditional...


Fap
 
2012-11-29 08:51:37 PM  

Doc Smiley: I have quite literally spent the last 6 months working on the software for a robot very similar to this one to act as an autonomous therapeutic aid or remote avatar for a therapist. The point of the robot face as opposed to that of a person is that human faces, with all our varied expressions, convey a lot of information and can easily overload a child with autism. The more simplistic, non-threatening faces are easier for the child to interact with. Additionally, because a robot can preform actions in a exact repeatable manner, many of the patients find it soothing for predictable behaviors.


This. My mom works with autistic children and sometimes they will just work on pictures of people and how you know what emotion they are feeling based on their face.

I mean mostly they work on communicating.
 
2012-11-29 09:00:47 PM  

farkplug: Matrix Flavored Wasabi: The scientist quoted in this article, Simon Baron-Cohen, is one of the world's leading experts on autism (I've read so many of his studies for tangentially related work) and is indeed related to Sacha Baron-Cohen. I think they're cousins or brothers, but I can't remember.

Cousins. Pretty different life courses, huh?


Read the whole family bio. It's amazing.
 
2012-11-29 09:07:55 PM  

LesterB: I'll just leave this here ...

Uncanny valley


*high five*

came for this ...

WeenerGord: [blog.lib.umn.edu image 347x280]


surprised and happy to find this!


/Soma Holiday's first album was called Terrycloth Mother... no, you shouldn't have heard of them. But they were fun.
 
2012-11-30 12:32:31 AM  

RatMaster999: SwissArmyGnome: [cdn.blogs.babble.com image 550x332]

/black is traditional...

Fap


I am sorry to say that I was caught off guard by rule 34 while I was GISing for that...
*shudder*
 
2012-11-30 04:42:38 AM  

imfallen_angel: it's like saying that someone with a missing leg, is being "treated" by being given a wooden peg.


Actually, a peg leg would help to alleviate the condition of missing a real one.

imfallen_angel: It's not a treatment, it doesn't "alleviate" their autism.


Alleviate - verb - to make easier to endure.
Treatment - noun - management in the application of medicines, surgery, etc.

You can say that /this/ treatment is something stupid *if* you didn't stop reading, but I think it could have really helped my kid in the earlier years.

/now he'd just be looking for USB ports to hack it.
 
2012-11-30 08:21:51 AM  

SteakMan: imfallen_angel: it's like saying that someone with a missing leg, is being "treated" by being given a wooden peg.

Actually, a peg leg would help to alleviate the condition of missing a real one.

imfallen_angel: It's not a treatment, it doesn't "alleviate" their autism.

Alleviate - verb - to make easier to endure.
Treatment - noun - management in the application of medicines, surgery, etc.

You can say that /this/ treatment is something stupid *if* you didn't stop reading, but I think it could have really helped my kid in the earlier years.

/now he'd just be looking for USB ports to hack it.


As I stated, this is not some new approach, it's been around, but like many things, it depends on the people giving out services and such to use the tools that they deem "proper".

They had the same thing 15 years ago via a computer screen... Using dolls and puppets.

The harsh truth about austism is that some CAN learn things, and other can't. That's why it's a spectrum disorder... And sadly, many can't deal with their children not being one of those that are just beyond that edge.
 
2012-11-30 09:20:08 AM  

imfallen_angel: As I stated, this is not some new approach, it's been around, but like many things, it depends on the people giving out services and such to use the tools that they deem "proper".

They had the same thing 15 years ago via a computer screen... Using dolls and puppets.

The harsh truth about austism is that some CAN learn things, and other can't. That's why it's a spectrum disorder... And sadly, many can't deal with their children not being one of those that are just beyond that edge.


What does any of that have to do with

imfallen_angel: Stopped reading at:

"Yet autism is treatable"


Are you saying that just because some patients won't respond to treatment, none should be treated?
 
2012-11-30 11:01:06 AM  

imfallen_angel: Stopped reading at:

"Yet autism is treatable"

Then started to wish the heads of all concerned would assplode for being this stupid.

If it was treatable, it wouldn't exist.


Lots of diseases are treatable still exist. In fact, I can only think of two treatable diseases that no longer exist, and one of those was only eradicated very recently.
 
2012-11-30 11:11:26 AM  

imfallen_angel: The harsh truth about austism is that some CAN learn things, and other can't. That's why it's a spectrum disorder... And sadly, many can't deal with their children not being one of those that are just beyond that edge


I know exactly. Things that work great for some autistic kids may be totally ineffective on others. (E.g. the stuff that works well for Aspies tends to be pointless for the nonverbals, and vice versa).

We do see the denial-ism a lot; parents who either turn a blind eye to the problems, or don't think the kid needs help. It doesn't help that a sizable number of people think there's no such thing (that it's just a lack of discipline or whatever). Like when President Obama used autistic kids as an example of who needs Medicaid on the campaign trail - on one hand it was good for the plight to get some airtime, on the other hand maybe it would have worked better had he used a disease that doesn't have so many haters (maybe leukemia).
 
2012-11-30 12:05:01 PM  

SteakMan: Are you saying that just because some patients won't respond to treatment, none should be treated?


Millennium: Lots of diseases are treatable still exist. In fact, I can only think of two treatable diseases that no longer exist, and one of those was only eradicated very recently.


The problem that I see this, is that this is not a treatment, it's an approach, it's a therapy/tool, but not a treatment for the handicap itself. It does nothing to correct the ailment.

How about we just go with "they didn't word it correctly" as it seems to bother so many that I don't agree with their claims.

Gaseous Anomaly: I know exactly. Things that work great for some autistic kids may be totally ineffective on others. (E.g. the stuff that works well for Aspies tends to be pointless for the nonverbals, and vice versa).

We do see the denial-ism a lot; parents who either turn a blind eye to the problems, or don't think the kid needs help. It doesn't help that a sizable number of people think there's no such thing (that it's just a lack of discipline or whatever). Like when President Obama used autistic kids as an example of who needs Medicaid on the campaign trail - on one hand it was good for the plight to get some airtime, on the other hand maybe it would have worked better had he used a disease that doesn't have so many haters (maybe leukemia).


That's just it... this is something that's not new, just a slight twist to an old somewhat proven method to get those that are borderline and are able to develop some communication skills. The range of the autistic children that this might help is very limited, and the other methods would or could have worked just as well. These children are part of the spectrum that any of these methods will work, and while variety can be a good thing, making claims as they do in this article leaves a bad taste.

But stories about autism are in fashion, it's the "feel good" stuff, where "oh my God" my kids is able to speak talks to this... odds are, with enough patience and someone properly trained, it would have happened anyways.

If there's one "popular" trend lately, it's been the bandwagon of autism and asperger's, which has been abused to death, and the self-diagnosed have come out of the closets and basement everywhere... I've heard so many stories where so many claim to be such, and I truly believe that they harassed their doctor until they cracked and signed the diagnostic papers just to get rid of them. For the doctors, the client has mental issues regardless, and the spectrum makes it very easy to slide anyone in there.

Heck according to the list of symptoms, I could easily make everyone (including myself) out to be within the spectrum.

Mental diseases run in my ex's family, and thanks to this, my daughter is autistic, and one other of my kids is dysphaxic (a fairly bad learning/understanding disability), which some would put it in the autism spectrum, but I wouldn't. Related yes, similarities for some of the symptoms,but another ball of wax. Many of her cousins are afflicted in the same way, so the whole question of hereditary, for me anyways, is a given.

But the way that some see it as a badge of honor and/or want their kids to be labeled as such, just because is would "explain" why their kids are idiots or they don't show interest in the development of their own kids, but this diagnostic would provide them with a "get out of jail" card and get "poor them" from others.

I honestly feel that my daughter being the way she is, is just nasty, I love her with all my heart, I've accepted that she's (now) an adult with the capacity of a 1 1/2 year old child, that this has causes many hardships on everyone in the family (me, my wife, the other kids), but she isn't to blame, and she suffers just as much and that is very easy to see... so we do our best.

We get no support at all from anyone or anything, so things are resolved as they are, and unless they would find a true breakthrough that could re-mesh the communication partition of the brain, there's not really much that can be done aside giving her a good life.

Sadly, because of the range of people that are placed within the spectrum, with many that probably shouldn't be, finding proper research, techniques, approaches, and even a cure, is all that much harder.

And now that it's been popularized... I see it as a double-edge sword... for funding and better understanding has come out, but abuse followed.

Which is why I hate this sort of article... it's completely self-serving and makes these people feel like they can tap themselves on the back without really doing something worth while.

I'd push for more stem cell research and such for a true treatment and hopefully an eventual cure, a robotic puppet isn't impressive in the least, but hey, someone sleep better about it.... 

I just don't believe in such self-serving things and they tend to annoy me greatly.
 
2012-11-30 01:07:47 PM  

imfallen_angel: How about we just go with "they didn't word it correctly" as it seems to bother so many that I don't agree with their claims.


Oh, sorry, I understand you now. But you were wrong and they were right.
They used the commonly accepted definition of treatment.
 
2012-11-30 01:59:45 PM  

SteakMan: Oh, sorry, I understand you now. But you were wrong and they were right.
They used the commonly accepted definition of treatment.


So... somehow, you still need to be "right" or something... ?

I can't really explain it better, but this is NOT a treatment in the sense that they are promoting/claiming in the article, it does NOT change the fact that the child is still as autistic as they were before this re-hashed tool is brought into play. This robot does this offer anything new. It is only an approach or a tool, but hey, it's a robot, so it's got to be better...right?

The statement they made that I object to is "Yet autism is treatable".

It isn't... all the proper therapy, approaches and such to achieve getting get them to a certain point is a whole different thing and can only work IF the afflicted person has the capacity/potential to reach that goal. If the person isn't capable, no amount of these things will work... hence, these are NOT a treatment that "fixes" autism as they let on.

But hey, I guess you're an expert... what's your credentials? Mine are having two children afflicted with such ailments, an ex that's paranoid schizophrenic (and several other members of that side of the family also is), others that includes bi-polarism, I have 3+ years medical learning, in both general and psych. (working directly with both doctors and patients) + a few years assisting in the field of autism and other mental illness with various organizations and schools, without including the reading on all this that I've done for a good 20 years.

But hey, I'm sure you going better...

Anyways.. I weary of this pissing contest some of you have decided on.
 
2012-11-30 04:23:37 PM  

imfallen_angel: So... somehow, you still need to be "right" or something... ?


No, I was honestly trying to understand you, I would never stay in a thread two days just to argue.
And trying to help you understand that you picked the wrong fight here. There is NOTHING in that article that contradicts ANY of your points. Nowhere in this thread and nowhere in the article does anyone even imply that autism can be fixed. I'm sorry that your definition for treatment isn't found in any English dictionary.

My credentials are similar to yours. In fact my wife has run out of meds to try for her depression and bi-polar so now we are talking about electroshock therapy.
 
2012-11-30 05:21:46 PM  

SteakMan: imfallen_angel: So... somehow, you still need to be "right" or something... ?

No, I was honestly trying to understand you, I would never stay in a thread two days just to argue.
And trying to help you understand that you picked the wrong fight here. There is NOTHING in that article that contradicts ANY of your points. Nowhere in this thread and nowhere in the article does anyone even imply that autism can be fixed. I'm sorry that your definition for treatment isn't found in any English dictionary.

My credentials are similar to yours. In fact my wife has run out of meds to try for her depression and bi-polar so now we are talking about electroshock therapy.


SteakMan: imfallen_angel: So... somehow, you still need to be "right" or something... ?

No, I was honestly trying to understand you, I would never stay in a thread two days just to argue.
And trying to help you understand that you picked the wrong fight here. There is NOTHING in that article that contradicts ANY of your points. Nowhere in this thread and nowhere in the article does anyone even imply that autism can be fixed. I'm sorry that your definition for treatment isn't found in any English dictionary.

My credentials are similar to yours. In fact my wife has run out of meds to try for her depression and bi-polar so now we are talking about electroshock therapy.


And with that ... I give up as you just insist in needing to be "right" for whatever ego boost that'll help you, as this just proves to me that your reading comprehension is too limited to bother continuing to explain things here.

Good luck with things, but seriously, if you're this thick, no wonder your wife suffers from depression, as you're hit the "jerk" levels and I'm putting you on ignore.
 
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