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(IT World)   Ten obviously untrue things programmers tell themselves, aside from "That chick in accounting totally wants me"   (itworld.com) divider line 10
    More: Misc, software engineers  
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7218 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Nov 2012 at 9:56 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-29 03:07:33 PM
1 votes:

verbaltoxin: /Office Space had it right. Engineers are terrible at dealing with people.


Actually, it's people who are terrible at dealing with engineers.
2012-11-29 12:10:01 PM
1 votes:
The biggest lie programmers tell themselves is: "A complete rewrite will make everything better"
2012-11-29 11:50:58 AM
1 votes:
13. This code doesn't need to be clean, it's more important that it runs correctly. I'll clean it up *after* we get it running properly.
2012-11-29 11:09:51 AM
1 votes:

FuryOfFirestorm: What a bunch of idiots, am I right? They should have totally asked for a mauve or chartreuse screen. Dumbasses.


I was in a meeting once where we were proposing our own (internal) custom solution for travel vouchers against an outside competitor. One of the firm requirements was the ability to split line item expenses. Simple. Ours did it.

The competitor complained about our color scheme.

AT&T decided to still buy the vendor product.

I left shortly thereafter.

Considering the downward spiral that company took after I left 15 years ago I feel a bit vindicated. Most of the papers I wrote for my Masters in Management of Technology (which AT&T farking paid for) were on what the company was doing wrong.
2012-11-29 10:20:40 AM
1 votes:

abhorrent1: It's not a bug; the user is doing something wrong - The code is doing what it's supposed to be doing; users are idiots.

This is probably true more often than not.


What is the purpose of the code if not to produce results in the real world? If the code fails due to user activity then it's not well suited to its primary function. The business world doesn't care that your code is 'better' only that it works. If it doesn't work then it's not good code. It really doesn't matter why it isn't working.
2012-11-29 10:18:49 AM
1 votes:
My favorite is

"Well it works on my machine"

Sure, the machine where you have all the SKDs installed, full local admin access and not controlled by any policies? You likely stopped the AV, firewall and all centralized management packages from running too. I bet your machine is not even on the domain...

So yeah, I don't give a fark that it works on yours, unless you are going to carry it and your ass up to accounting and do the receivables for the 10 people that now can't work.
2012-11-29 10:14:24 AM
1 votes:
It's not a bug; the user is doing something wrong - The code is doing what it's supposed to be doing; users are idiots.

This is probably true more often than not.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-11-29 09:45:50 AM
1 votes:
I had to deal with rewriting this awful unmaintainable program where "correct" behavior was defined as "whatever version XYZ of this program did on some large input." New version never did work "correctly." The closest thing to a spec was an attempt to define the grammar, but not the semantics, of the input language. Other than Halo I could point to most of the things in that article.
2012-11-29 09:44:42 AM
1 votes:

Diogenes: Wow. Author didn't put alot of thought into that list. I wonder if he was playing Halo while writing.


Yeah, that was incredibly lazy.
2012-11-29 09:19:08 AM
1 votes:
Wow. Author didn't put alot of thought into that list. I wonder if he was playing Halo while writing.
 
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