If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Daily Beast)   American Red Cross collects $150 million dollars in donations for Sandy victims, but can't seem to find a way to get that money to Sandy victims   (thedailybeast.com) divider line 113
    More: Interesting, American Red Cross, Red Cross, Michelle Manning, Ocean County, relief efforts, St. Francis  
•       •       •

7093 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Nov 2012 at 12:52 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



113 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-11-29 09:26:53 AM
That's pretty much the Red Cross way.

/oh look, bonuses!
 
2012-11-29 09:46:16 AM
Obvious tag displaced by Sandy?
 
2012-11-29 09:50:44 AM
You need $150 million to send fat bureaucrats off to "conferences" at five star hotels and resorts where there's plenty of rich food and drink.

That's how you truly help the needy.
 
2012-11-29 09:54:11 AM
But they're trying really really hard, until they figure out a way that money will just sit in our bank account.
 
2012-11-29 10:12:31 AM
I hear they're charging for donuts again.
 
2012-11-29 10:14:36 AM

L.D. Ablo: You need $150 million to send fat bureaucrats off to "conferences" at five star hotels and resorts where there's plenty of rich food and drink.

That's how you truly help the needy.


But that's what we have government for!
 
2012-11-29 12:55:12 PM
Call the Storm Troopers !
 
2012-11-29 12:57:49 PM
But Obama is going to give everyone everything they need!
 
2012-11-29 12:57:50 PM
Sorry, did someone forget that a non-profit is a business like every other business?
 
2012-11-29 12:58:51 PM
I'll get the money to the victims. Send me the money.

Can one of you tell the red cross they can send the money to me, please?
 
2012-11-29 12:59:37 PM
Wow... there is a whole lot of stupid in this thread....

let's see... Storm is coming, what do we do? do we send aid to people right now and pay for that with funds we have right now? Well, that is how the Red Cross usually does business.

After the storm hits, people send money.Great! But the RC already paid for the aid they sent to Sandy victims. What do they do?

use the cash to pay for the next emergency you farking retards!
 
2012-11-29 01:01:43 PM

maddogdelta: Wow... there is a whole lot of stupid in this thread....

let's see... Storm is coming, what do we do? do we send aid to people right now and pay for that with funds we have right now? Well, that is how the Red Cross usually does business.

After the storm hits, people send money.Great! But the RC already paid for the aid they sent to Sandy victims. What do they do?

use the cash to pay for the next emergency you farking retards!



Except the article clearly states that while in the disaster area he did not see the original expenditure.
 
2012-11-29 01:01:49 PM
$ 150,000,000 and I'm GETTING MUTHERFARKING GREEN BEANS??!?!?!
/MF-ERS better be serving LOBSTERS!!!
 
2012-11-29 01:01:58 PM
That's the way the Red Cross operates. The key is preparedness: Have all the necessary equipment and supplies ready in advance of the disaster. Use the money from the previous disaster relief fund-raisers for this event and use the money gathered by Sandy fund-raisers for the next (and future) events.

//Wonders how many times he's read this article in some format or another.
 
2012-11-29 01:03:28 PM

maddogdelta: Wow... there is a whole lot of stupid in this thread....

let's see... Storm is coming, what do we do? do we send aid to people right now and pay for that with funds we have right now? Well, that is how the Red Cross usually does business.

After the storm hits, people send money.Great! But the RC already paid for the aid they sent to Sandy victims. What do they do?

use the cash to pay for the next emergency you farking retards!


Let me guess, you didn't read the article?
 
2012-11-29 01:04:04 PM
I will never, ever, EVER, give one red cent to an organized charity.

I will give my last dollar to someone I know is in need.
 
2012-11-29 01:04:11 PM
It's easy, you load some expired cans of mushroom soup on a bus and drive to the disaster.
 
2012-11-29 01:05:11 PM
Send it to Gore and invest it in his green mutual funds and save us from future changes in the weather.
 
2012-11-29 01:05:57 PM
From what I gather in TFA no one is questioning how donations to the Red Cross work. They are questioning what exactly they are doing on the ground.

I'm sure the Red Cross has a large presence in the area but it is a legitimate question to ask if you're counting on these organizations to provide relief.
 
2012-11-29 01:07:17 PM
This is why you don't donate money to these relief groups... instead you just go wherever the disaster is right after it happens and dive around looking for people you can help.

Trust me... it's the best way. They only ask that people stay away to maintain their monopoly on the relief industry.
 
2012-11-29 01:08:03 PM
Charity organization pockets donation money. News at 11

img11.hostingpics.net
 
2012-11-29 01:09:31 PM
After every major disaster, it's same thing. Send $10 to 90blahblahblah...then the money never gets to the victims in a timely manner (if at all).

It happened during 9/11, the Indian Ocean tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, the Fukushima earthquake/tsunami...what made anyone think Superstorm Sandy would be any different?

Yes, I know the logistics of getting aid into a disaster area is somewhat complicated...but c'mon, it's the same damn gong show every time!
 
2012-11-29 01:10:39 PM
Just checked. I can fit at least 2.3 million in my SUV. I'd be glad to help.
 
2012-11-29 01:12:16 PM

FarkinHostile: I will never, ever, EVER, give one red cent to an organized charity.

I will give my last dollar to someone I know is in need.


The Smeggy Fund to disorganize slut clothing will accept your money, spread slutty clothing all over the floor, backs of chairs, ceiling fans, etc
 
2012-11-29 01:13:58 PM

FarkinHostile: I will never, ever, EVER, give one red cent to an organized charity.

I will give my last dollar to someone I know is in need.


Ages ago I remember my ol' man telling me: "Most charities have some guy at the top making $20,000 a year and sitting in a plush office. You'd be better off giving to a local charity or church that sponsors a clinic or something like that."

That was back when $20k was a pretty good paycheck - adjust for inflation, and the advice is still good.

Add to this list: charities with a political axe to grind. I quit volunteering for a national charity after my third or fourth lecture on how a certain political viewpoint was evil. Honestly, if I wanted lectures I'd visit the politics tab.
 
2012-11-29 01:13:59 PM

occamswrist: Let me guess, you didn't read the article?


Let me guess. Anecdotal evidence from one guy on the ground means the Red Cross didn't do anything because a blah guy is in the white house and SOSHALUZM!
 
2012-11-29 01:14:08 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com

seems appropriate...
 
2012-11-29 01:14:13 PM
i1207.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-29 01:14:40 PM
That barely covers their executives pay... come on people!... donate some more.
 
2012-11-29 01:15:20 PM
Summary of the article: "I didn't personally see the Red Cross while I was out being (if I do say so myself) so super, but humbly, awesome. Therefore, because I have some unsourced comments about why I didn't personally see them, they did nearly nothing at all."

Certainly, this is journalism at its finest.
 
2012-11-29 01:16:26 PM

maddogdelta: occamswrist: Let me guess, you didn't read the article?

Let me guess. Anecdotal evidence from one guy on the ground means the Red Cross didn't do anything because a blah guy is in the white house and SOSHALUZM!


You caught me Sherlock.
 
2012-11-29 01:17:49 PM
Apparently many contributors didn't get the memo where it states over 90% of all monies collected are used to support the infrastructure of Red Cross offices keeping track of the things the other Red Cross offices do in a whirling dervish of paper pushing and office parties.
 
2012-11-29 01:18:29 PM

TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: Summary of the article: "I didn't personally see the Red Cross while I was out being (if I do say so myself) so super, but humbly, awesome. Therefore, because I have some unsourced comments about why I didn't personally see them, they did nearly nothing at all."

Certainly, this is journalism at its finest.


This; also: Great to see the "I GOT MINE, FARK YOU!" posters in this thread.
 
2012-11-29 01:22:47 PM
It's only $150,000,000.00, I don't think they could have hired a couple of helicopters and pilots to bring in relief supplies with that paltry sum.
 
2012-11-29 01:24:57 PM
150 million doesn't go a long way when the quadrant is home to almost that many people... Red Cross blew their rep after 9/11 and Katrina. Saw em both firsthand...

I wouldn't mind starting a charity. And yes, I'd pull a fat salary.
 
2012-11-29 01:30:51 PM
Iceberg659
I'm sure the Red Cross has a large presence in the area

What makes you so sure?
 
2012-11-29 01:31:10 PM
I guess these places are empty and no food or clothing are available

Sandy Feeding locations
 
2012-11-29 01:33:11 PM
Press release: "The Red Cross has distributed more than 300,000 relief items to victims..."

Like with Sears "101 piece" tool sets, that's 1000 boxes of Q-tips.
 
2012-11-29 01:34:57 PM

themasterdebater: Sorry, did someone forget that a non-profit is a business like every other business?



Actually, the non-profits tend to be much more profitable.
 
2012-11-29 01:35:01 PM
aofg.blogs.com
 
2012-11-29 01:40:56 PM

Amos Quito: themasterdebater: Sorry, did someone forget that a non-profit is a business like every other business?


Actually, the non-profits tend to be much more profitable.


Ab-so-farkin'-lutely.

Don't believe us? Go to your local non-profit, especially something like a state-supported school. Pull their IRS Form 990. Check out the salaries for the folks at the top.
 
2012-11-29 01:42:16 PM
Charity, the GOP's idea of a social net. What could possibly go wrong?
 
2012-11-29 01:48:02 PM
floor of my house was destroyed in Sandy (Long Beach NY)

Saw the Red Cross once, who asked if I needed food (which the Natl Guard was distributing). Not blankets or anything like that.

The Natl Guard, however, has been Johnny-on-the-spot during the whole ordeal, starting the day after the storm.

DO NOT GIVE TO RED CROSS.
 
2012-11-29 01:48:24 PM
There are some non-profit charities that only take 10% percent of donations for administrative costs. The problem is they are not in the United States.

Tzu Chi is an awesome example.
 
2012-11-29 01:48:27 PM

imtheonlylp: Just checked. I can fit at least 2.3 million in my SUV. I'd be glad to help.


why are u so eager to help?
 
2012-11-29 01:50:57 PM
Red Cross press release archive, if anyone's interested in their side of the story.
 
2012-11-29 01:56:44 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Red Cross press release archive, if anyone's interested in their side of the story.


Wow, they picked the worst font on the internet for the "Public Still Plans to Give to Charities During the Holidays" section... ugh.

Also, press releases don't really count as a side to a story.
 
2012-11-29 02:04:49 PM

maddogdelta: Wow... there is a whole lot of stupid in this thread....

let's see... Storm is coming, what do we do? do we send aid to people right now and pay for that with funds we have right now? Well, that is how the Red Cross usually does business.

After the storm hits, people send money.Great! But the RC already paid for the aid they sent to Sandy victims. What do they do?

use the cash to pay for the next emergency you farking retards!


RTFA sometime, jackass. The Red Cross cannot be found in the Sandy disaster area, according to boots-on-the-ground responders ranging from city government to volunteers from other charities.

They aren't spending the aid sent specifically for Sandy, and despite your ignorance, that money is legally raised for Sandy relief, and can only be spent for Sandy relief - they lost a court case over their previous fraudulent fundraising on that issue.

What is more, they aren't spending any previously raised money, either. You claim they are spending money they already had in the bank, TFA has multiple witnesses WHO ARE ACTUALLY THERE saying they aren't spending anything at all.

Just collecting.

And letting other organizations do the real work. Which is consistent with what emergency volunteers have reported in the past, from several disaster sites.

Have your mommy read you the article. It's clearly not one of your skills.
 
2012-11-29 02:07:13 PM

pjbreeze: There are some non-profit charities that only take 10% percent of donations for administrative costs. The problem is they are not in the United States.


There are many charities that take 10% or less for admin fees. Brothers Brother takes less than 0.5% - over an order of magnitude better than your example.
 
2012-11-29 02:08:10 PM
Do your research, folks. My money goes to the Salvation Army.
 
2012-11-29 02:12:00 PM
Here's what the Red Cross say they've done:
In the last month, the Red Cross has provided tens of thousands of shelter stays, served millions of meals and snacks, handed out millions of relief supplies, and provided other assistance like thousands of health services and emotional support contacts.

And earlier:
The Red Cross response to Sandy is massive. To date, the Red Cross has helped families and individuals in ten states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico affected by Sandy. The Red Cross has:

Served more than 4.8 million meals and snacks
Provided more than 70,100 overnight stays out of a total of 130,000 provided by all organizations
Made more than 43,800 health services and emotional support contacts
Handed out more than 477,700 relief items


Possibly the article's author is a dumbass?
 
2012-11-29 02:12:36 PM

plumbicon: Do your research, folks. My money goes to the Salvation Army.

Aren't they led by a bunch of bigots?

http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/blogs/bostonspirit/2012/11/is_the_sa lv ation_army_antilgbt.html
 
2012-11-29 02:12:38 PM
One hundred fifty million dollars dollars?
 
2012-11-29 02:15:15 PM

monoski: Charity, the GOP's idea of a social net. What could possibly go wrong?


Pretty much the same things that go wrong when the government does it, except with less overhead.
 
2012-11-29 02:16:20 PM
Come on those executives aren't going to feed themselves, now are they?
 
2012-11-29 02:18:49 PM

OldManDownDRoad: Amos Quito: themasterdebater: Sorry, did someone forget that a non-profit is a business like every other business?


Actually, the non-profits tend to be much more profitable.

Ab-so-farkin'-lutely.

Don't believe us? Go to your local non-profit, especially something like a state-supported school. Pull their IRS Form 990. Check out the salaries for the folks at the top.


Salaries are profit now?
 
2012-11-29 02:22:51 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Red Cross press release archive, if anyone's interested in their side of the story.


No, I'm not interested.
 
2012-11-29 02:25:56 PM
These charities are cash cows. Years ago another well-known charity brought all the members of my office into a room and closed the doors, trapping us in a manditory meeting. They used all the peer pressure and cult-like tactics they could think of to make everyone sign cards giving them automatic payments from every paycheck. The cards were placed in front of each person at a table and you looked like a jerk if you didn't sign up. I didn't though. They were pushy, creepy, and acted entitled. I'm sure you know who I'm talking about. I had the impression they were sales staff on commission.

I don't know if it's true but I heard 6 months after the Japan disaster not a single bottle of water had been given out by the Red Cross despite the hundreds of millions of dollars donated.

I've heard that the Salvation Army is a good hearted organization, though and puts their money into directly helping those who need to better themselves and reclaim their lives. Their leadership draws little or no salary. They put people to work that no one else will hire, and give them a first job or second chance. I do respect that.
 
2012-11-29 02:34:07 PM

Fibro: BarkingUnicorn: Red Cross press release archive, if anyone's interested in their side of the story.

Wow, they picked the worst font on the internet for the "Public Still Plans to Give to Charities During the Holidays" section... ugh.

Also, press releases don't really count as a side to a story.


Especially if you don't read them.
 
2012-11-29 02:34:13 PM

themasterdebater: Sorry, did someone forget that a non-profit is a business like every other business?


Because if you believe profit == "teh evil", then non-profit must be good.

royone:

Salaries are profit now?


Nope, but since non-profits (and NGO's) don't have shareholders or have financial analysts/investors look over their books, many have "administrative bloat" going on at the top level. That's money and resources not going to their stated mission. There are plenty of sites out there attempt to monitor and report on these, but I bet they are rarely used before people give money.
 
2012-11-29 02:47:06 PM

syberpud:
Salaries are profit now?

Nope, but since non-profits (and NGO's) don't have shareholders or have financial analysts/investors look over their books, many have "administrative bloat" going on at the top level. That's money and resources not going to their stated mission. There are plenty of sites out there attempt to monitor and report on these, but I bet they are rarely used before people give money.


Well, people are free to be as careful with their money (or not) as they choose.
Charity Navigator is a pretty easy to use resource for vetting charities. They are also a non-profit, but I wouldn't rely on them to rate themselves. :)

Here's the Red Cross score. They took in $3 billion and spent $150 million on salaries.

Here's FEMA's financial report (PDF). They got $13billion in budget and spent a little over $1 billion on salaries.
 
2012-11-29 02:49:58 PM
The number one rule of the Red Cross is to NOT PUT ANY VOLUNTEER IN ANY DANGER. Ya, I'm sure while you were out getting your truck stuck in disease infested mud bogs while battling fallen trees with a crowbar you didn't see any Red Cross presence. At least there's a handful of people in this thread that have clue. Unfortunately not many.

What's the average Red Cross volunteer? A 67 year old retiree. You want them out pushing a 2 ton Emergency Response Vehicle out of a ditch?

The stupid in this thread burns.
 
2012-11-29 02:51:41 PM

royone: Here's the Red Cross score. They took in $3 billion and spent $150 million on salaries.

Here's FEMA's financial report (PDF). They got $13billion in budget and spent a little over $1 billion on salaries.


Got a little slap-dash there in comparisons. Red Cross had about $250 million in salaries and fundraising expenses. FEMA had just over $1 billion in salaries and expenses, on $10 billion in discretionary budget.
 
2012-11-29 02:56:15 PM
Red Cross provided over 77,000 shelter nights IMMEDIATELY AFTER SANDY HIT. Tell all those people that had a roof over their head after their house was destroyed the Red Cross sucks. Oh, and here's a Link
 
Ehh
2012-11-29 02:57:16 PM
The Red Cross should give that money to me. I'll make sure it gets to the right people.
 
2012-11-29 03:01:00 PM

imtheonlylp: Just checked. I can fit at least 2.3 million in my SUV. I'd be glad to help.


You can fit 1 million in a shopping bag and walk around with it.

What does a trillion dollars look like?
 
2012-11-29 03:11:57 PM

royone: Here's what the Red Cross say they've done:

Handed out more than 477,700 relief items


OK. So it was 1500 boxes of Q-tips.
 
2012-11-29 03:13:45 PM

royone: OldManDownDRoad: Amos Quito: themasterdebater: Sorry, did someone forget that a non-profit is a business like every other business?


Actually, the non-profits tend to be much more profitable.

Ab-so-farkin'-lutely.

Don't believe us? Go to your local non-profit, especially something like a state-supported school. Pull their IRS Form 990. Check out the salaries for the folks at the top.

Salaries are profit now?



Salaries are not profit as currency is not money.

/Semantics
 
2012-11-29 03:13:48 PM

basemetal: That's pretty much the Red Cross way.

/oh look, bonuses!


Bada Bing we're done here
 
2012-11-29 03:22:32 PM

royone: Here's what the Red Cross say they've done:
In the last month, the Red Cross has provided tens of thousands of shelter stays, served millions of meals and snacks, handed out millions of relief supplies, and provided other assistance like thousands of health services and emotional support contacts.

And earlier:
The Red Cross response to Sandy is massive. To date, the Red Cross has helped families and individuals in ten states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico affected by Sandy. The Red Cross has:

Served more than 4.8 million meals and snacks
Provided more than 70,100 overnight stays out of a total of 130,000 provided by all organizations
Made more than 43,800 health services and emotional support contacts
Handed out more than 477,700 relief items

Possibly the article's author is a dumbass?


The problem with this is thar the shelters were high schools that didn't charge the red cross, the meals were donated by the community, the supplies from cleaning supplies to clean the shelter to diapers and bottles of water were donated from the community and the workers were volunteers from the community. The red cross had two official red cross people that I saw there as I donated, and picked up goods. (I donated things from my home that weren't destroyed by the storm such as Windex, and picked up things we needed such as diapers) I don't get it. Why did they need 150 million when the community stepped up and provided the space and the goods?
 
2012-11-29 03:23:43 PM
Screw the red cross, check out these guys:
http://www.operationbbqrelief.org/
 
2012-11-29 03:25:27 PM

occamswrist: I'll get the money to the victims. Send me the money.

Can one of you tell the red cross they can send the money to me, please?


Hey, I'm a victim of Sandy! Just send the money to me. No need for occamswrist to play middle-man.
 
2012-11-29 03:26:52 PM
Article fails to mention if there was a request made for services. If people and city employees don't ask for services then they might not get anything because the Red Cross hasn't been informed. Information can be put out on facebook, obtained from the Red Cross service delivery app and from the hurricane or other apps. If that doesn't work then pick up a phone and call the Red Cross or county services.
 
2012-11-29 03:28:16 PM
Do your research, folks. My money goes to St. Jude Children s Hospital.
 
2012-11-29 03:36:09 PM
I wouldn't give the Red Cross a nickel....by the time that $150 million is played around
with by the "suits" that run the red cross, the Sandy people might get 1/4th of it.
Give your money to the Salvation Army....at least they siphon off the least.
 
2012-11-29 03:55:03 PM

5monkeys: the meals were donated by the community


"The community" donated 4.8 million meals? I find that implausible. And nobody had to collect it, transport it, or distribute it, apart from some volunteers who needed no organizing?
70,100 overnight stays were all in donated high school space? And the bedding came from...?
They also claim to have mobilized 14,400 trained disaster workers.

I don't question that the Red Cross is only part of the response. I do question the claims that they've done next to nothing.

I don't know whether they can put $150 million all to Sandy-related use. It's a lot of money, and they have a fairly limited scope. But if they continue as they have in the past, about 94% of it will be used for programs apart from salaries and fundraising.
 
2012-11-29 03:59:45 PM

rocinante721: floor of my house was destroyed in Sandy (Long Beach NY)

Saw the Red Cross once, who asked if I needed food (which the Natl Guard was distributing). Not blankets or anything like that.

The Natl Guard, however, has been Johnny-on-the-spot during the whole ordeal, starting the day after the storm.

DO NOT GIVE TO RED CROSS.


CSB time

1943 the suchow pow camp, the prisoners were traded for japs we had in our country. the Sweedish ship grisfholme brought these people to the US mostly medical staff from the St Marks hospital/medical school in shanghai. the red cross charged them for their packages and other items clothes tooht powder soap. all of these items had been donated by Americans. also several of these nurses then joined the army medical corps and served for the rest of the war.

NEVER GIVE TO THE RED CROSS
 
2012-11-29 04:05:18 PM
 
2012-11-29 04:10:20 PM
Volunteers from Vermont and New Hampshire continue to help in areas affected by Superstorm Sandy.
Red Cross Regional Executive Larry Crist said Wednesday that the White Plains, N.Y. area is requesting 50 to 75 additional volunteers, mainly to work in client services. For that type of assistance, as well as other volunteer work, some training by the Red Cross is necessary, he said.

Introductory training takes 2.5 hours, and more in-depth training from 3.5 to 8 hours, Crist said. People may learn more at the website of the Vermont/New Hampshire Valley region: www.redcrossvtnhuv.org.

Doug Bishop, Red Cross Communications Director for the region, reported that more than 5,100 Red Cross workers from all 50 states are supporting shelters, providing food and water at fixed sites and driving through neighborhoods to distribute meals and supplies. The organization also has mobilized more than 10,500 trained workers, 90 percent of whom are volunteers.
 
2012-11-29 04:11:25 PM

royone: Here's what the Red Cross say they've done:
In the last month, the Red Cross has provided tens of thousands of shelter stays, served millions of meals and snacks, handed out millions of relief supplies, and provided other assistance like thousands of health services and emotional support contacts.

And earlier:
The Red Cross response to Sandy is massive. To date, the Red Cross has helped families and individuals in ten states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico affected by Sandy. The Red Cross has:

Served more than 4.8 million meals and snacks
Provided more than 70,100 overnight stays out of a total of 130,000 provided by all organizations
Made more than 43,800 health services and emotional support contacts
Handed out more than 477,700 relief items

Possibly the article's author is a dumbass?


Is that a rhetorical question? :)
 
2012-11-29 04:13:15 PM

swingbozo: The number one rule of the Red Cross is to NOT PUT ANY VOLUNTEER IN ANY DANGER. Ya, I'm sure while you were out getting your truck stuck in disease infested mud bogs while battling fallen trees with a crowbar you didn't see any Red Cross presence. At least there's a handful of people in this thread that have clue. Unfortunately not many.

What's the average Red Cross volunteer? A 67 year old retiree. You want them out pushing a 2 ton Emergency Response Vehicle out of a ditch?

The stupid in this thread burns.


No kidding; could light up Milwaukee with the amount of stupid on display here.

/shiat, probably could fire up a few grills too
 
2012-11-29 04:15:07 PM

royone: 5monkeys: the meals were donated by the community

"The community" donated 4.8 million meals? I find that implausible. And nobody had to collect it, transport it, or distribute it, apart from some volunteers who needed no organizing?
70,100 overnight stays were all in donated high school space? And the bedding came from...?
They also claim to have mobilized 14,400 trained disaster workers.

I don't question that the Red Cross is only part of the response. I do question the claims that they've done next to nothing.

I don't know whether they can put $150 million all to Sandy-related use. It's a lot of money, and they have a fairly limited scope. But if they continue as they have in the past, about 94% of it will be used for programs apart from salaries and fundraising.


But the problem I see being in an effected area, and being effected myself is how the money is collected. The radio ads for donations are saying the money will be used directly for sandy victims. They don't say give us money to pay our operating costs, or money will be reserved for future disasters. They are claiming every dollar will go directly to those who need it now. The communities are doing that, not the red cross. The local school teachers went door to door on their own time delivering meals to those cleaning up. The churches are handing out gift cards for daily needs, and helping those without insurance rip out the wreckage. No operating costs. They are on the ground. There are so many examples of the community doing it without all the extra BS. We don't see that with the red cross.
 
2012-11-29 04:19:45 PM

Kencyr: That's the way the Red Cross operates. The key is preparedness: Have all the necessary equipment and supplies ready in advance of the disaster. Use the money from the previous disaster relief fund-raisers for this event and use the money gathered by Sandy fund-raisers for the next (and future) events.

//Wonders how many times he's read this article in some format or another.


i483.photobucket.com
Because if you would have actually read TFA you'd know that this is about the Red Cross collecting money for the next disaster and doing next to nothing for the people who suffer in this one. Reminds me of the Red Cross 9-11 funds that went to the Red Cross...and stayed there.
 
2012-11-29 04:24:08 PM
I've been a Red Cross volunteer for 8 years. I'm about to deploy to the Sandy disaster area. I've also deployed to: Florida (x4), Texas (x2) and North Carolina. Unless you're involved from this end it's hard to imagine the scale of what the Red Cross actually does and how much it costs.

For example, when the Red Cross does a disaster assessment (DA) survey, the first thing they do is rent a huge fleet of cars. Volunteers drive them. We go up and down the streets to check off damage. We assess the condition of the homes, whether or not the electricity is on, the availability of food and gas, people's immediate needs, etc. We look for cheap office space. We talk to business owners. We have to do this before the Red Cross starts deploying more resources. The rest of the organization can't operation without good intelligence. DA cars aren't marked--they're just regular rental cars--so it's possible the correspondent didn't notice them. On the other hand, volunteers are supposed to be in uniform. Damage assessment is not always easy and can be dangerous, for what that's worth.

The Red Cross provides shelter. They provide most of the emergency shelter in the country. Thousands of people stayed in Red Cross shelters during Hurricane Sandy. These people would not have had another place to go--the reason they're staying in a shelter is because they can't afford hotels. Some people are still there. The space for shelters is usually donated, but shelters have to be staffed 24 hours a day. Volunteers provide registration service, food and snacks, medical and emotional care, entertainment for children and safety and security. A lot of people in the shelter need additional social services, so hopefully someone will help them get connected.

Eventually (around the 2 to 3 week mark), the local volunteers are going to burn out or have to go back to work. Then Red Cross volunteers from across the country cycle in to replace them. So you should ask yourself: how do these volunteers get into the disaster area? Once there, where do they stay? How do they meet their day-to-day needs? Here's how: they fly in on airplanes and they stay in hotels at business rates. Which the Red Cross pays. That may seem like an extravagance, but if all the volunteers had to drive their own cars, pay for their own gas, and sleep in a tent in the park, who would they get to volunteer? I don't mind sleeping in a tent in a park (I've done it), but most volunteers are retired. They're in their 60s and 70s. Would you want your parents to sleep outside in Newark in December? Does that seem like a smart decision?

Aside from transportation and shelter, you have to assume between $20-40 per day, per volunteer, in food and personal expenses (toothbrushes, etc.). Yes, the Red Cross does pay for meals if you are on deployment.

Who keeps track of the volunteers and contacts family members if they get hurt (or killed)? Who makes sure volunteers are background-checked? Who make sure volunteers are qualified and trained for their jobs? Who's going to manage the fleet of rental cars and make sure nobody gets in an accident or drives off with one? Most of the people who do these things for the Red Cross are also volunteers, but you need information systems, which means you need IT setup and maintenance. And you have to have a secure place to put that stuff. That means you have to rent office space in coastal disaster areas on extremely short notice. Sooner or later that office space also needs to have electricity, working plumbing and top-notch communications. Do you know how much a satellite truck costs? Do you know what it gets in MPG? Do you know how long it takes to get it where it needs to be when there's no gas, no traffic lights, and debris in the road? It's not easy and the Red Cross does it all the time.

When you talk about Red Cross bulk distribution ("handing out supplies"), that's logistics on a Wal-Mart or U.S. Army scale. It takes a while to get the wheels in motion, and then you still have do to it right. Because the Red Cross is almost all volunteer-run, it's not always perfect and things don't always work the way they should. But I've seen bulk distribution from the warehouse, shelter and ERV end, and we usually get the kinks worked out eventually.

Also keep in mind that most deployments only last 2-3 weeks. So you're basically setting up a multimillion dollar company in a couple of weeks, then getting a completely new staff (including management) every 14-21 days. Which is free but not easy.

Yes, it's a lot of money, but disaster relief is expensive. It's really, really expensive. Try renting 100 cars immediately after a disaster sometime. Try buying food for 30,000 people. Try issuing preloaded debit cards for 1000 volunteers, finding them a safe place to stay in a disaster area, and then buying them plane tickets. Basically you have to turn the money spigot on and not turn it off for 3-12 months.

There is literally no way the Red Cross could "be there" at scale in the first week/s of a disaster. Even we were there, you might not see us. Your community has to be able to take care of itself for that long, because nobody else is going to be able to get in. Once they're there, it takes around a week to be operational. So what this person did is what you should do, but this person has already gone back to their daily life. That's where the Red Cross steps in. From the Red Cross perspective, this disaster isn't over. It's just beginning.

You may not be the biggest fan of the ARC, or the biggest fan of this model of disaster relief.That's perfectly respectable, and you should consider donating to the Southern Baptists (great kitchens) or the Salvation Army (which has their own ERVs). But to imply that the Red Cross is stealing the money because they're not fully deployed yet reflects a poor understanding of the Red Cross and the challenges of large scale disaster relief operations. And any other major org is going to face the same challenges in the early days/weeks of a disaster.

TL;DR The correspondent is mad at the Red Cross for not being able to do impossible things.

/The National Guard is not an all-volunteer charitable organization. Of course they were there first.
// If you'd like to help (and see what really happens to all that money), get in touch with your local chapter. There is a lot to do locally even if you can't deploy. And it doesn't cost you anything except some time.
/// Above is my personal opinion and perspective as a private citizen, not the opinion of the Red Cross.
 
2012-11-29 04:32:01 PM
Reminds me of an email forward my dad sent me recently. Seems like it makes the rounds after every disaster:
Link

I can understand the trepidation with giving organizations money because you don't know where it's going, but I never understood the complaint of the CEO having a substantial salary. In the case of the Red Cross you're dealing with a billion dollar worldwide organization. Shouldn't the CEO be compensated commensurately?

And according to another fun recent email forward Canada has found the cure for cancer but no one will invest in it because it's not profitable.
 
2012-11-29 04:32:30 PM

5monkeys: They are claiming every dollar will go directly to those who need it now.


I don't know what they're claiming, but I doubt they're saying "every dollar will go directly".

The communities are doing that, not the red cross.

Amazing, self-organizing communities.

The local school teachers went door to door on their own time delivering meals to those cleaning up.

The Red Cross supports volunteers. Just because volunteers are involved, you assume that there's no Red Cross assistance? If the teachers organized the project, made the meals, and so forth, great. If they didn't, the Red Cross may have provided organizational assistance, as well as material support.

The churches are handing out gift cards for daily needs, and helping those without insurance rip out the wreckage. No operating costs. They are on the ground.

Good. The Red Cross can't do everything. They do what they do.

There are so many examples of the community doing it without all the extra BS. We don't see that with the red cross.

What community are you in? You realize that some other communities may have had different experiences? Sandy cut a big swath.
 
2012-11-29 04:35:55 PM
I'll take it to them.
 
2012-11-29 05:04:48 PM

royone: 5monkeys: They are claiming every dollar will go directly to those who need it now.

I don't know what they're claiming, but I doubt they're saying "every dollar will go directly".

The communities are doing that, not the red cross.

Amazing, self-organizing communities.

The local school teachers went door to door on their own time delivering meals to those cleaning up.

The Red Cross supports volunteers. Just because volunteers are involved, you assume that there's no Red Cross assistance? If the teachers organized the project, made the meals, and so forth, great. If they didn't, the Red Cross may have provided organizational assistance, as well as material support.

The churches are handing out gift cards for daily needs, and helping those without insurance rip out the wreckage. No operating costs. They are on the ground.

Good. The Red Cross can't do everything. They do what they do.

There are so many examples of the community doing it without all the extra BS. We don't see that with the red cross.

What community are you in? You realize that some other communities may have had different experiences? Sandy cut a big swath.


The ads say exactly that. Every dollar will go to help those directly effected by sandy.

The red cross did not help the teachers do that. They grouped together and did it on their own. I asked them when they came to my door how they got the idea, and they said seeing so many students homes destroyed they wanted to help. This is what they came up with.

I am in ocean county NJ. Not a barrier island, but a community with a lot of lagoon and bay homes. 500 plus homes in my small section were deemed uninhabitable. Basically all of the lagoon homes. The water went through in a five foot swell, and damaged a few blocks of homes not on the water.
 
2012-11-29 05:20:20 PM

Sheila_McSly: I've been a Red Cross volunteer for 8 years. I'm about to deploy to the Sandy disaster area. ...


You that the Red Cross is ABOUT TO SHOW UP at the Sandy disaster that happened OVER A MONTH AGO?

Guess that menas this article that says they haven't seen any sign of the Red Cross of all wrong then....

You're doing a Heckuva Job There Reddie.
 
2012-11-29 05:31:12 PM

L.D. Ablo: You need $150 million to send fat bureaucrats off to "conferences" at five star hotels and resorts where there's plenty of rich food and drink.

That's how you truly help the needy.


That's the Jimmy Wales' way. And the Bono way.
 
2012-11-29 05:34:43 PM

netringer: Sheila_McSly: I've been a Red Cross volunteer for 8 years. I'm about to deploy to the Sandy disaster area. ...

You that the Red Cross is ABOUT TO SHOW UP at the Sandy disaster that happened OVER A MONTH AGO?.


No, I mean, I'm about to show up. I'm probably relieving someone who's been there for three weeks.
 
2012-11-29 05:44:13 PM

Sheila_McSly: I've been a Red Cross volunteer for 8 years....


Thank you! It's amazing to see people complain that a multi-million dollar corporation staffed almost entirely by volunteers can't magically appear instantaneously with zero operating costs. The Red Cross IS NOT a first responder.
 
2012-11-29 05:47:51 PM

royone: Here's what the Red Cross say they've done:
In the last month, the Red Cross has provided tens of thousands of shelter stays, served millions of meals and snacks, handed out millions of relief supplies, and provided other assistance like thousands of health services and emotional support contacts.

And earlier:
The Red Cross response to Sandy is massive. To date, the Red Cross has helped families and individuals in ten states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico affected by Sandy. The Red Cross has:

Served more than 4.8 million meals and snacks
Provided more than 70,100 overnight stays out of a total of 130,000 provided by all organizations
Made more than 43,800 health services and emotional support contacts
Handed out more than 477,700 relief items

Possibly the article's author is a dumbass?


And a whole lot of that food and "supplies" are donated. Volunteer workers that get called in are expected to pay their own way and provide for themselves. So unless those gift cards they handed out amount to about a hundred million dollars...
 
2012-11-29 05:53:58 PM

Shyla:
And a whole lot of that food and "supplies" are donated. Volunteer workers that get called in are expected to pay their own way and provide for themselves. So unless those gift cards they handed out amount to about a hundred million dollars...


Uhm, no. Local volunteers are expected to live in their own houses and drive to the disaster relief. Once the disaster response exhausts the supply of local volunteers then they need to start flying volunteers in and housing them. The Red Cross ran out of local volunteer resources two days before superstorm sandy even made it onshore.
 
2012-11-29 06:06:55 PM

5monkeys: The ads say exactly that. Every dollar will go to help those directly effected by sandy.


Cool. So the money they get that way will have to be spent on direct relief.

I see that all Red Cross shelters in the Ocean County Area are closed as of Nov 23. Which, of course, means that they were open for a while preceding that. There's something.

And here's a little something.
Through this beneficial partnership and the strategic planning between Red Cross mass care and feeding, the USNA Midshipmen and Red Cross volunteers delivered 500 meals to Lavallette residents and provided over 70,000 cleaning supplies to individuals in Ocean County.


You're free to think that it's all a big scam, and everything they claim to do doesn't really cost anything except volunteers. That's what all the cool kids think.
 
2012-11-29 06:12:31 PM

someguy945: imtheonlylp: Just checked. I can fit at least 2.3 million in my SUV. I'd be glad to help.

You can fit 1 million in a shopping bag and walk around with it.

What does a trillion dollars look like?


have to have room for the 5 hookers and 8 kilos to make the ride tolerable... sustenance, yanno?
 
2012-11-29 06:17:00 PM

Shyla: And a whole lot of that food and "supplies" are donated.


Not true. Most of the food, cleaning kits and hygiene kits are bought in bulk. They are also stored, organized and transported by the Red Cross at cost. You know how much it costs to rent a refrigerator truck? Or put gas in it and drive it from, say, the bulk distribution warehouse in Ohio (or wherever) to Long Island? I don't, but it's not free.

/FWIW
 
2012-11-29 06:47:14 PM

netringer:
You're doing a Heckuva Job There Reddie.


Wow, you are a monumental douche.
 
2012-11-29 08:40:46 PM
A relative of mine who was a relief worker after the November 6, 1977 flood that devastated Toccoa Falls College said that the Red Cross only stayed long enough to get the word out that they needed donations, then left. The Salvation Army stayed until they were no longer needed.
 
2012-11-29 08:52:34 PM
Looks like the anti-Red Cross/RW derp squad once again trying to spread the usual propaganda.
 
2012-11-29 09:03:03 PM

Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf: A relative of mine who was a relief worker after the November 6, 1977 flood that devastated Toccoa Falls College said that the Red Cross only stayed long enough to get the word out that they needed donations, then left. The Salvation Army stayed until they were no longer needed.


I'll file that under wild unfounded rumors. Different chapters respond to different disasters differently. You have no idea what the circumstances or the resources the local chapter of the Red Cross had at it's disposal at that time. Painting the Red Cross with a brush of any one individual response is not a good way to paint any organization.

This thread is filled with so much wild false and ridiculous lies I'm just going to leave. I suggest some of you people actually research your complete bullshiat garbage before spouting it off as facts.

/ like that's going to happen
 
2012-11-29 09:38:36 PM

Sheila_McSly: I've been a Red Cross volunteer for 8 years. I'm about to deploy to the Sandy disaster area. .


Thank you for being so honest. I've been a big SA supporter in the past. I've kind of slacked off in the last few years and I doubt I'll ever give again.

I'm not saying there's much fraud involved, but if your description is true - the outfit seems to be greatly mismanaged. A $3.4B/yr tax exempt corporation can't do better than rental cars and motel rooms? The raw material of the finished product is donated labor and property. I realize only $1B of this is from actual donations, but the $2.3B brought in from program services, (classes and such), seems a little high. Not for profit?

It just seems to me that flying retired volunteers business class to safe locations near disaster areas to be given rental cars and motel rooms is not very cost effective; and to actually hire people to make sure the retired people don't walk off... I don't know, it's hard to wrap my head around. Not your fault - it's the CEO's fault.

The company makes over $3B. Taking just $100M of that - take it into an area that's the hardest hit and most in need - that's a $1000/victim for an area with 100,000 victims. A grand is a lot to spend with all the donated resources. I could buy each a sleeping bag and tooth brush with cash left over to feed them prime rib for a couple months. For that kind of money jets could be chartered to fly victims out; spread them out a little and the impact wouldn't be as great.

Not that the way it's done is wrong, but the company sales pitch doesn't portray the money I give during an emergency will go for a couple week trip for a retired person, with very little going to victims. 

With a majority of the company's income and expense going to program services in the form of classes, it seems the charity/disaster part is just a sideline. I think the lack of visibility of the company during actual disasters proves this point.

/just stressed from working too much
//need a vacation
///where do I sign up
 
2012-11-29 09:58:30 PM

RanDomino: Iceberg659
I'm sure the Red Cross has a large presence in the area

What makes you so sure?


Nothing really. I just don't want to believe the "go to" disaster relief org is farking everyone over.
 
2012-11-29 11:02:37 PM

Ficoce: Sheila_McSly: I've been a Red Cross volunteer for 8 years. I'm about to deploy to the Sandy disaster area. .

Thank you for being so honest. I've been a big SA supporter in the past. I've kind of slacked off in the last few years and I doubt I'll ever give again.

I'm not saying there's much fraud involved, but if your description is true - the outfit seems to be greatly mismanaged. A $3.4B/yr tax exempt corporation can't do better than rental cars and hotel rooms?


Well, the Red Cross used to provide money directly to victims using either checks or cash cards, but donors don't like that either. If you took the money and spent it on prime rib or booze, everyone would still be upset (though I, personally, would not have a problem with buying you a drink if you just lost your house). Also there were some victims who would go to several different chapters with the same story so they would get extra money. It's very hard to distribute cash without collecting grifters. It was a serious problem. I'm really not sure what's going on with that aspect of the program. They could still very well be issuing prepaid cards to victims under certain circumstances.

I agree with you that the rental cars/hotel rooms thing is not super efficient. But it takes a long time for Red Cross culture to change. And in the meantime workers have to eat, sleep & get to and from the work site. Really the jobs on a disaster aren't that different from normal jobs. The best way to help change it is to get involved.

I'm in my 20s & I'd love it if more people my age could volunteer. But can you leave work/school/family for several weeks in your 20s and 30s?

Well. Mabe we shouldn't be deploying people or things that way at all. But then you're going to have to basically rebuild the organization from the ground up. And that's not going to help Sandy victims today. On the other hand, an ERV serving free hot meals might, no matter how it got there.

/once again, that's personal opinion, not the position of the Red Cross
//it's a volunteer organization, so please join if you have some good ideas. I'm not joking. Most of the volunteers & staff involved are pretty cool and you really do get to help people. Also it's always a real eye-opener. It's certainly not all sunshine & kumquats, but I really think the biggest problem is inefficiency, not fraud. I think things will change, but people have to participate. It's easy to criticize. That said, I totally understand people who don't like this model. I have certainly had my own ups & downs with the organization. I think most volunteers have. I hope you'll do something else though.
///If you're serious about joining, contact your local chapter.
 
2012-11-29 11:19:20 PM
OK, this is the last thing, but it's not a vacation when you're putting in 12-14 hour days on a difficult and sometimes dangerous job. Especially when you're an older person. And we fly economy class.

/finished
 
2012-11-30 02:16:12 AM

Pray 4 Mojo: This is why you don't donate money to these relief groups... instead you just go wherever the disaster is right after it happens and dive around looking for people you can help.

Trust me... it's the best way. They only ask that people stay away to maintain their monopoly on the relief industry.


If you can be physically present to help people, that's great.

But it you're talking about getting supplies to people - food, blankets, whatever, then you're compeltely wrong.

ARC buys in bulk, at wholesale. They have experience creating kits that give people the supplies to clean up, or sleep, etc. They can make a dollar go MUCH farther than you can picking up stuff at Wally world and handing it out on your own.

They also distribute supplies to community groups, so that little comfort kit that the local church or other community org was handing out may well have come from the Red Cross.

I'm sure you can find all kinds of anecdotal evidence of absence for the Red Cross, FEMA, or whatever. People hear about a telethon and think that means these people should be on every corner.

I hope these whiners get that audit they want (and guess where the money to pay for that will come from). Open the books, show the supplies purchased and distributed. There aren't any shareholders, they don't pay dividends, and if you think $500K is a huge salary for a CEO of an organization with thousands of employees (and many more volunteers) you're ridiculously naive.

That's not to say their overhead/admin/fundraising costs are so low as to be stellar, or that there are no lessons to be learned to improve response to the next disaster. But the conspiracy derp that they're somehow hoarding money to jet off to five star hotels is pretty silly, verging on tin foil hat territory.
 
2012-11-30 02:43:36 AM
Notice all the good press the National Guard has received? Even Victoria Secret passed out the warm fuzzies after having generators and a fork lift at the right place at the right time. People give the Red Cross the kind of money that could really make a difference. If they were a public company the shareholders would be making the changes. Maybe giving donors voting rights would give upper management a reason to pause; their jobs would be tied to productivity and results. It is the donor's money they are spending after all. If that didn't make them happy - they should drop the NFP facade and do what they are good at - being a social service and first aid training company.
 
2012-11-30 09:04:53 AM
Finally the siliver lining to the existence of entitled douchebag new yorkers, they notice right away and say something when they aren't getting money and assistance.
 
2012-11-30 10:27:55 AM

Bunkyb123: They used all the peer pressure and cult-like tactics they could think of to make everyone sign cards giving them automatic payments from every paycheck. The cards were placed in front of each person at a table and you looked like a jerk if you didn't sign up. I didn't though. They were pushy, creepy, and acted entitled. I'm sure you know who I'm talking about.


United Way.
 
2012-11-30 11:05:09 AM

Ficoce: The company makes over $3B. Taking just $100M of that - take it into an area that's the hardest hit and most in need - that's a $1000/victim for an area with 100,000 victims. A grand is a lot to spend with all the donated resources. I could buy each a sleeping bag and tooth brush with cash left over to feed them prime rib for a couple months. For that kind of money jets could be chartered to fly victims out; spread them out a little and the impact wouldn't be as great.


How the hell would you get the food there? Where would you land the jets? How would you get people from where they are, through the broken and flooded roads, to the jets? How much would it cost to house them somewhere outside the city? How much would it cost to get them back? Do these people have the money to feed themselves, or do you need to feed them? How are you going to restore their way of life?

Or do you just move them from the disaster area, dump them on the street, and let them be homeless somewhere that's not flooded and has running electricity?
 
2012-11-30 11:18:32 AM

Sheila_McSly: I agree with you that the rental cars/hotel rooms thing is not super efficient. But it takes a long time for Red Cross culture to change. And in the meantime workers have to eat, sleep & get to and from the work site.


Workers are more important than displaced street rats.

Repeat: Workers are more important than displaced street rats.

Displaced street rats need to be kept fed, sheltered, and basically alive and healthy. That's why the workers are there. The best way to do this is to restore the area to a functional community with housing and infrastructure that allows the displaced street rats to stay fed, sheltered, and basically alive and healthy. In the mean time, you need to put out extra effort supplying tents, food, medical care, and so on to keep these folks alive and well. Barely.

Workers are useful. Workers are actually fixing shiat, getting food and water to people, cleaning up the road, restoring the infrastructure. Workers need to be kept fed, sheltered, alive, healthy, and fresh in body and mind. They need to sleep comfortably at night and wake up feeling refreshed. They need extraneous medical supplies and services--massages and things like tiger balm will keep their bodies feeling great, helping their minds stay sharp so they can stay in the area and continue to provide aid for a longer period before we have to waste a ton of money shipping them out and shipping new volunteers in. Likewise, feeding these folks better is important--they're doing work, they need more food, more minerals that are being burned through, more calories that are being used for fuel, and something decently palatable to keep stress down so we don't have to cycle them out.

New workers are expensive and difficult to bring in. They show up with no friggin' clue what's going on. The smooth, flowing operation that comes from weeks of working at a certain job is lost; these people have to figure out what's going on around them, what the situation is, who knows best what needs to happen, etc. They need to integrate with the community and the relief teams, they need to integrate with the specific disaster, they need to get a feel for what stage of recovery we're in, catch up to all the little micro-projects happening around them and figure out what direction the workflow should go in. They're inefficient to the point of uselessness. A fresh volunteer is a blunt screwdriver for the first several days, and even after a week or two they're still less-than-optimal. If we could keep these folks for months on end they'd be a hell of a lot more effective.

Unfortunately, we can't. There is an endless shortage of labor power in emergent situations. Nobody gets weekends. You work every god damn day, you work all day, you don't go home and hang your coat and then go out to the clubs Friday night. You work and work and work until you go farking insane, because if you slow down people die. Then when you burn out in three weeks, we replace you, not because it's efficient but because we have to.

The least we can do is give these people a nice bed and a good meal. We need them to last as long as they can. They're going to wear out in mind and body so fast.
 
2012-11-30 04:12:47 PM
I work for a large organization. We have a grant to help the unemployed. I could not get the money on the streets without taking it to 2 boards, 3 purchasing agents, and 5 layers of approvals. So I feel the RC's problems and will not throw stones.
 
2012-11-30 05:07:28 PM

Fibro: BarkingUnicorn: Red Cross press release archive, if anyone's interested in their side of the story.

Wow, they picked the worst font on the internet for the "Public Still Plans to Give to Charities During the Holidays" section... ugh.

Also, press releases don't really count as a side to a story.


Aren't press releases the most pure form of "a side to a story" and completely unencumbered by a writer's or an editor's context or an interviewer's questions?
 
Displayed 113 of 113 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report