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(io9)   A world map of average life expectancy by country   (io9.com) divider line 20
    More: Interesting, life expectancy, CIA World Factbook, Don't Bother  
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9208 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Nov 2012 at 8:33 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-11-28 09:03:36 PM
2 votes:
screw the golden years, I want my obit to read "He was as sharp as a tack at 85 before going on that coke and heroin binge leading up to the shooting rampage at Radio City Music Hall"
2012-11-28 08:45:44 PM
2 votes:
The countries that beat the US are important.

But, the countries that aren't far behind are pretty important too. Mexico, Albania, Libya, Poland, Argentina, etc.

These are countries that average 1/4th or less of the US per capita spending on health care. And they live, on average, 1-2 years less than the average American.

The model average American works ~7-8 years of his career just to pay for health expenses (when Medicare, etc, are in the picture).

We could have Mexican-level care working for 2. The Mexican life expectancy is 2 years shorter than ours. 8-2-2... seems like a 4-year net gain in retirement to me. Oh, and these are prime years (the extended lifespan of Americans generally translates to dotage years). The marginal benefits are small and shrinking.
2012-11-29 08:40:37 AM
1 votes:

Ishkur: Canada is homogenous?


Apparently the fact that immigrants outnumber Canadian-born citizens in the country's largest city isn't supposed to count.
2012-11-29 08:28:41 AM
1 votes:
Quality >quantity
2012-11-29 04:50:14 AM
1 votes:
Jersey is a separate country? Are not the channel islands part of Great Britain?
2012-11-29 04:22:05 AM
1 votes:
Damn... sucks to be Haiti. Made it to the big 3-0? Congrats, you're above average. :(
2012-11-29 02:30:13 AM
1 votes:

jaytkay: People who expected death panels should get death panels.


I love this idea.

Hold a nation-wide poll, asking people a few key questions about what they think the HCA does/will do. Don't tell anyone what it's for, or just say you're collecting opinions for some harmless reason. Better yet, say it's part of some sort of national referendum that may effect its retention/repeal, to encourage the crazies to participate.

For anyone who takes the poll, tailor their care according to their answers.

In fact, that would work great for all kinds of things. Tax hike on 4% of the population, but 28% say their taxes went up as a result of the same legislation (note: yes, that happens)? OK, your Palin-American perspective is now reality (for you)!

Don't understand marginal tax rates and think you just get taxed at your top rate, period? Good news for the rest of us: now you do!

This has the makings of a damn funny satirical skit, now that I think about it.
2012-11-29 02:02:01 AM
1 votes:
Another difference between the U.S. and the countries ahead of them on this list: gun-related deaths.
2012-11-29 01:45:25 AM
1 votes:

Mike Chewbacca: My sister in law just tonight posted on Facebook that she doesn't like the government telling her what to do (which in this case meant buy health insurance). Neither of her adult children have health insurance because it's too expensive and their employers don't offer it. Her grandchildren are on Medicaid. She and my brother were on welfare back when they first got married (she had a kid from a prior relationship--got knocked up at 16). Now, I fully believe in tax-funded safety nets. We have them because life is hard and shiat happens. I don't begrudge her her history of welfare (like the extreme majority of recipients, they got off it as soon as possible), and I don't begrudge her grand kids their Medicaid; it's not their fault their (divorced) parents' employers don't offer insurance. But for her to biatch about the government telling her what to do when her family has directly benefited from it, well, fark her and her hypocrisy.


People who expected death panels should get death panels.

Take your sister-in-law. Please.

rimshot.jpg
2012-11-29 01:29:53 AM
1 votes:
My sister in law just tonight posted on Facebook that she doesn't like the government telling her what to do (which in this case meant buy health insurance). Neither of her adult children have health insurance because it's too expensive and their employers don't offer it. Her grandchildren are on Medicaid. She and my brother were on welfare back when they first got married (she had a kid from a prior relationship--got knocked up at 16). Now, I fully believe in tax-funded safety nets. We have them because life is hard and shiat happens. I don't begrudge her her history of welfare (like the extreme majority of recipients, they got off it as soon as possible), and I don't begrudge her grand kids their Medicaid; it's not their fault their (divorced) parents' employers don't offer insurance. But for her to biatch about the government telling her what to do when her family has directly benefited from it, well, fark her and her hypocrisy.
2012-11-29 12:56:24 AM
1 votes:

jaytkay: Arkanaut: for most of human history, the average person in even the most advanced society could not expect to live past forty

Is that correct for people who survive infancy?

Seems like history is full of people who lived into there 40s, 50 and 60s.


Wikipedia has a chart.
2012-11-28 09:31:14 PM
1 votes:
For as fat as our nation is our health care network is doing a hell of a great farking job keeping you people alive that long. Eat smaller portions and help cut healthcare costs you pigs.
2012-11-28 09:25:36 PM
1 votes:
The Man Who Laughs: These are countries that average 1/4th or less of the US per capita spending on health care. And they live, on average, 1-2 years less than the average American.

Americans die expensive deaths. Take someone that's going to die, no matter what medical technology tries to do for them.

In the US, they will try all sorts of stuff to save someone that's ultimately not saveable (as long as they have the cash to pay).

In another country, maybe they don't try as hard.

The end result is that in both countries, it counts as one death, but the cost of that death is way higher in the US.

// you see a similar thing with fetus deaths and the reporting of fetus deaths, the US tries to save all sorts of premature births while some other countries with lower baby mortality rates have those rates because they don't count preemies as part of their regular statistics.
2012-11-28 09:23:52 PM
1 votes:

Bruce Campbell: This just in: predominantly homogeneous first world countries are best equipped for handling the health issues of its citizens and doing so economically. Film at 11


Canada is homogenous?
2012-11-28 09:20:59 PM
1 votes:

The Man Who Laughs: Well maybe I should have said similar medical standards. I don't know much at all about american spending, but I can tell you for sure I'd rather be treated by an american hospital than a Mexican one.


Don't look below the US on the list of health care quality. Look up.

US health care is worse than France, Germany, Sweden, Canada, the UK, etc.

At twice the price per capita.
2012-11-28 09:08:56 PM
1 votes:

jaytkay: The Man Who Laughs: the usa or other countries with similar spending levels

There are no other countries with similar spending levels to the US.

We pay TWICE as much per capita as normal countries.


Well maybe I should have said similar medical standards. I don't know much at all about american spending, but I can tell you for sure I'd rather be treated by an american hospital than a Mexican one.
2012-11-28 09:06:35 PM
1 votes:
Quite a few of those shouldn't even be considered countries. I think they were put on that list just to keep the US out of the top 25.

/Geography nerd
2012-11-28 09:03:32 PM
1 votes:
I don't know about you guys, but I couldn't live on the isle of man for 80 years. I have needs.
2012-11-28 08:57:07 PM
1 votes:

Lawnchair: The countries that beat the US are important.

But, the countries that aren't far behind are pretty important too. Mexico, Albania, Libya, Poland, Argentina, etc.

These are countries that average 1/4th or less of the US per capita spending on health care. And they live, on average, 1-2 years less than the average American.

The model average American works ~7-8 years of his career just to pay for health expenses (when Medicare, etc, are in the picture).

We could have Mexican-level care working for 2. The Mexican life expectancy is 2 years shorter than ours. 8-2-2... seems like a 4-year net gain in retirement to me. Oh, and these are prime years (the extended lifespan of Americans generally translates to dotage years). The marginal benefits are small and shrinking.


All of that is probably true for deaths due to natural causes, but I'd wager that accidental injuries in those countries are more often fatal than they would be in the usa or other countries with similar spending levels. Having my life be potentially saved at 33 years old seems to me to be a pretty large benefit of an advanced health care system.
2012-11-28 08:52:09 PM
1 votes:

Lawnchair: We could have Mexican-level care working for 2.


Or French-level care working for 3 or 4 if we had normal 1st world health care funding.
 
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