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(io9)   A world map of average life expectancy by country   (io9.com) divider line 69
    More: Interesting, life expectancy, CIA World Factbook, Don't Bother  
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9209 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Nov 2012 at 8:33 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-29 01:40:12 AM  

MrEricSir: jaytkay: Arkanaut: for most of human history, the average person in even the most advanced society could not expect to live past forty

Is that correct for people who survive infancy?

Seems like history is full of people who lived into there 40s, 50 and 60s.

Wikipedia has a chart.


That page shows that from 1200 to 1500 CE, if you reached age 21, you were likely to reach 60 or 70.
 
2012-11-29 01:45:25 AM  

Mike Chewbacca: My sister in law just tonight posted on Facebook that she doesn't like the government telling her what to do (which in this case meant buy health insurance). Neither of her adult children have health insurance because it's too expensive and their employers don't offer it. Her grandchildren are on Medicaid. She and my brother were on welfare back when they first got married (she had a kid from a prior relationship--got knocked up at 16). Now, I fully believe in tax-funded safety nets. We have them because life is hard and shiat happens. I don't begrudge her her history of welfare (like the extreme majority of recipients, they got off it as soon as possible), and I don't begrudge her grand kids their Medicaid; it's not their fault their (divorced) parents' employers don't offer insurance. But for her to biatch about the government telling her what to do when her family has directly benefited from it, well, fark her and her hypocrisy.


People who expected death panels should get death panels.

Take your sister-in-law. Please.

rimshot.jpg
 
2012-11-29 02:02:01 AM  
Another difference between the U.S. and the countries ahead of them on this list: gun-related deaths.
 
2012-11-29 02:19:50 AM  

Kevin72: Bob Down: Nobody mentioned socialised medicine yet.

Socialised medicine.

The years I lived and worked in Japan and Taiwan I received GREAT soshulized medicine. Low co-pays and all.


Now I know you didn't really work in Japan. I had a lot of issues with infections when I first came here, and a couple cases of bad food poisoning, so I've got some experience.... I will never go to the doctor here ever again because its just too scary. Terrifying.

It's a shame, too. My wonderful "socialized medicine" costs me 200 bucks a month, plus 30% of any medical costs. That's far more than I paid in the states (25yo non-smoker, occasional drinker, lift and play basketball regularly).
 
2012-11-29 02:30:13 AM  

jaytkay: People who expected death panels should get death panels.


I love this idea.

Hold a nation-wide poll, asking people a few key questions about what they think the HCA does/will do. Don't tell anyone what it's for, or just say you're collecting opinions for some harmless reason. Better yet, say it's part of some sort of national referendum that may effect its retention/repeal, to encourage the crazies to participate.

For anyone who takes the poll, tailor their care according to their answers.

In fact, that would work great for all kinds of things. Tax hike on 4% of the population, but 28% say their taxes went up as a result of the same legislation (note: yes, that happens)? OK, your Palin-American perspective is now reality (for you)!

Don't understand marginal tax rates and think you just get taxed at your top rate, period? Good news for the rest of us: now you do!

This has the makings of a damn funny satirical skit, now that I think about it.
 
2012-11-29 04:22:05 AM  
Damn... sucks to be Haiti. Made it to the big 3-0? Congrats, you're above average. :(
 
2012-11-29 04:50:14 AM  
Jersey is a separate country? Are not the channel islands part of Great Britain?
 
2012-11-29 07:21:51 AM  

unyon: The Man Who Laughs: Well maybe I should have said similar medical standards. I don't know much at all about american spending, but I can tell you for sure I'd rather be treated by an american hospital than a Mexican one.

Speak for yourself. I've had outstanding care in Mexico. Near where my place is down there, they recently built a huge new hospital specifically catering to medical tourism.


Medical tourism? Is that where you watch a donkey show while having your spleen removed?
 
2012-11-29 08:28:41 AM  
Quality >quantity
 
2012-11-29 08:40:37 AM  

Ishkur: Canada is homogenous?


Apparently the fact that immigrants outnumber Canadian-born citizens in the country's largest city isn't supposed to count.
 
2012-11-29 08:51:23 AM  

jaytkay: Seems like history is full of people who lived into there 40s, 50 and 60s.


Certainly, but most of the people who don't survive that long don't make it into the history books. I guess what I was trying to say is that the mean was lower but the standard deviation was higher?
 
2012-11-29 09:55:05 AM  
I'm not certain about the Japan data for this:

More than 230,000 elderly people in Japan who are listed as being aged 100 or over are unaccounted for, officials said following a nationwide inquiry.

An audit of family registries was launched last month after the remains of the man thought to be Tokyo's oldest were found at his family home.

Relatives are accused of fraudulently receiving his pension for decades.
 
2012-11-29 10:06:05 AM  

MrEricSir: jaytkay: Arkanaut: for most of human history, the average person in even the most advanced society could not expect to live past forty

Is that correct for people who survive infancy?

Seems like history is full of people who lived into there 40s, 50 and 60s.

Wikipedia has a chart.


Woo! I always thought this and winced every time someone would say "Well yeah but you only lived till 35 in the middle ages!", but I didn't have data to back me up. Now I do!

*clinks glass* Gracias!
 
2012-11-29 10:59:38 AM  

Ishkur: Bruce Campbell: This just in: predominantly homogeneous first world countries are best equipped for handling the health issues of its citizens and doing so economically. Film at 11

Canada is homogenous?


ADHD Librarian: Predominantly homogeneous countries like Australia?


Aren't you guys cute, ignoring the Northern European demographics of these countries.
 
2012-11-29 11:44:24 AM  
The U.S. is down at #50 for infant mortality rates (in the same league as former Soviet Block countries), and has 23% of children living in poverty (second to last in the developed world) so it's not really surprising that the overall life expectancy average is much lower than the countries that the US would like to consider its peers.
 
2012-11-29 01:15:14 PM  

Arkanaut: This is notable because for most of human history, the average person in even the most advanced society could not expect to live past forty, mainly because of disease.


If you made it out of childhood, it wasn't that bad. The average adult could live into their 50's even in the Paleolithic, and into their 60's in the Middle Ages. Problem was, they often didn't make it through childhood.
 
2012-11-29 02:24:01 PM  

Bruce Campbell: Ishkur: Bruce Campbell: This just in: predominantly homogeneous first world countries are best equipped for handling the health issues of its citizens and doing so economically. Film at 11

Canada is homogenous?

ADHD Librarian: Predominantly homogeneous countries like Australia?

Aren't you guys cute, ignoring the Northern European demographics of these countries.


Just to check we are on the same page, you are comparing us to the US with its 73% white or European population, right?
 
2012-11-29 05:52:54 PM  
We know how to define death, so that isn't a problem with these numbers. One inherent problem with life expectancy numbers is different countries define life differently. This usually only comes up in discussions of infant mortaility, suc as when someone makes a ludicruous claim about Cuba's superiority to the United States, but the same problem affects these numbers as well. If a premature baby is born alive and dies, and that doesn't count as a birth, then you can't compare data to another country where that is counted as a live birth (and then a death) that will hit life expectancy statistics. It's like comparing your golf score to that of the guy who takes mulligans.
 
2012-11-29 08:17:55 PM  

Ambitwistor: Arkanaut: This is notable because for most of human history, the average person in even the most advanced society could not expect to live past forty, mainly because of disease.

If you made it out of childhood, it wasn't that bad. The average adult could live into their 50's even in the Paleolithic, and into their 60's in the Middle Ages. Problem was, they often didn't make it through childhood.


I don't think they bothered reporting the "average" adult back then. They may have written down dates of birth and death for people born into the nobility, but I don't think they bothered for an awful lot of the peasants. The data might be a bit biased.
 
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