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(News.com.au)   Best. Neighbor. EVER   (news.com.au ) divider line
    More: Cool, Betty Harris, Mrs Harris, Mr and Mrs, Sydney University, financial adviser, cognitive impairment  
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39336 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Nov 2012 at 9:45 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2012-11-27 11:23:55 PM  
3 votes:

twfeline: Well-meaning daughter gets shafted by demented mom.


Know how I know you didn't read the article?

(there is no daughter)
2012-11-27 10:16:56 PM  
3 votes:
About 10 houses down from my folks, a 28ish and single brunette would give this then 15yr old oral favors in exchange for around the house tasks. Lasted about a year. She was a good neighbor.
2012-11-27 09:48:11 PM  
3 votes:
I'm going to start buddying up to every old person in my neighborhood.
2012-11-27 11:36:51 PM  
2 votes:
My "uncle" Max died two years ago. He had somehow accumulated over $2 million. He had very few relatives. I received nothing. He left most of his money to educational institutions and his doctors.
2012-11-27 10:42:44 PM  
2 votes:
Don't be a twat and give your wealthy neighbor some wealth.

Just tell the family you're giving all the money to a church or something.

Then give it to the ones who are still nice to you.
2012-11-27 10:29:32 PM  
2 votes:

weave: There's absolutely no reason for a wealthy person to be shipped off to a nursing home by anyone. You can hire in 24/7 skilled nursing care into their home if needed (and a security guard to watch the care givers to make sure they don't rip off the place).


It's a lot cheaper to have in home care than to go into a home too.
2012-11-27 10:23:57 PM  
2 votes:
There's absolutely no reason for a wealthy person to be shipped off to a nursing home by anyone. You can hire in 24/7 skilled nursing care into their home if needed (and a security guard to watch the care givers to make sure they don't rip off the place).
2012-11-27 10:07:38 PM  
2 votes:
"The Grays would be surprised, (while) my family are waiting for me to die," Mrs Harris said.

"I am determined that my relatives after what they have put me through will not get one cent."


Good for her. Sounds like her relatives were a bunch of uncaring little bastages who didn't even check in on her and were just vulturing her.

Fark 'em. And DOUBLE-Fark them for contesting. She has the right to leave her money to anyone she wants.
2012-11-27 10:04:00 PM  
2 votes:
This is why if you have any old wealthy relatives always make a point to visit and entertain them. Just because you think the money should be yours doesn't mean it is already and you should spend some time wit that aging person and get them to like you. I am always amazed at the number of stories or rich old people who never get visited by their children or grandchildren who seem to take it for granted that they will receive that money one day and seem to think they are entitled to it because of who they where born to.
2012-11-27 09:54:24 PM  
2 votes:
I read the whole freaking article and the last line is:

"Keith Harris made his fortune making radios and televisions."

THEEEE HARRIS RADIO? Are you kidding? Maybe they could have mentioned that one right up front.


/best field radios ever
//PRC 117F baby.
2012-11-27 09:54:05 PM  
2 votes:
In his ruling today, Justice Richard White found that Mrs Gray - a wealthy Sydney University academic and barrister - was entitled to the estate

Rich woman leaves estate to another rich woman. Heartwarming.
2012-11-27 09:48:38 PM  
2 votes:
I've always felt that if I were really rich and not too fond of the family, before I died, I'd pick 5 names at random out of the phone books that way they can just be surprised one day to get so much money from some insane old bitty they never met. And my dog. My dog would have enough money to pay a caretaker very generously and still have a comfortable allowance for toys and the good dog food.
2012-11-29 06:31:30 AM  
1 vote:
bury
2012-11-28 10:29:44 AM  
1 vote:
We actually have a little old lady living next door to us - her husband passed away several years ago and her kids rarely come visit her. Our kids go over, especially our daughter, and sit with her for hours just talking. We get the kids to also bring her trash can(s) up from the road and taking her plates of food over when we grill out, or invite her over for holiday parties, etc. I also send the boys over to cut her grass during the summer. These things aren't done for any type of reward or payment, but to just be neighborly and helpful. I guess it's more a matter of personal gratification knowing that you can help someone out without asking for, or expecting something, in return.

/warm fuzzy feeling
//something something karma something else
2012-11-28 05:24:43 AM  
1 vote:

Another interesting tidbit.


Mrs Hart applied for control over Mrs Harris's affairs when Mrs Harris became ill in 2005. Justice White found Mrs Hart applied for control in order to "protect her inheritance".


Basically, Mrs Harris kewnt of a niece tried to ship Mrs Harris on a nurcing home, and stripped her of control over her own money, to try to "protect her inheritance". That forced Mrs Harris to simply not have any money to spend, to the point she had to borrow money from her neighbours.

Suits the niece quite nicely, if I say so myself.
2012-11-28 03:11:36 AM  
1 vote:
Similar thing happened in my family. A women I'd always none as my aunt until her death was a family friend that we had always taken care of and few knew she wasnt really related. Her family tried to so us when she left us all her money. They lost.
2012-11-28 01:56:17 AM  
1 vote:
Also it's odd this story popped up less than a day after I was considering whether I should go over and check on my elderly neighbor...
2012-11-28 01:51:58 AM  
1 vote:
I'm going to leave my refrigerator and microwave to the poor.
2012-11-28 01:43:26 AM  
1 vote:
Fortunately, nobody in my family ever has had any money, so I haven't had these kinds of problems. I would even give up my quarter stake of mom's house if my brother's vicious coont of a wife tried to contest it, just to be rid of her.

My wife, on the other hand, has had some wealth in her family. There was some to-do over her grandfather's million-dollar home, and her great-aunt's million-dollar NYC condo, and we haven't seen anything from either estate.
2012-11-28 01:24:30 AM  
1 vote:

Anenu: This is why if you have any old wealthy relatives always make a point to visit and entertain them. Just because you think the money should be yours doesn't mean it is already and you should spend some time wit that aging person and get them to like you. I am always amazed at the number of stories or rich old people who never get visited by their children or grandchildren who seem to take it for granted that they will receive that money one day and seem to think they are entitled to it because of who they where born to.


I only managed to visit my grandmother 2-3 times a year because of the 10+ hour drive to Indy (been living on the poor end of the spectrum seems like forever, so it's hard to get the time and gas money). I did try as often as possible and called her fairly often (for me, anyway), and she ended up leaving the estate split between myself and my two sisters. Stocks, some cash, and 1/3 ownership of her house to each of us. That's what enabled me to put a majority down on our (modest) house, thankfully.

However, I would rather have my Granny back. I miss her :(
2012-11-28 01:23:03 AM  
1 vote:
I do not care where you live, you should be allowed to leave your money to whoever you want to! If your children are a bunch of asshats then you should be able to leave your money to the kindly neighbor who visited you every day and your children should not be able to contest the will!
2012-11-28 01:07:15 AM  
1 vote:

danknerd: Thanks for the taxes


No taxes, unless she already owed some. It's Sydney, not some stupid Merkin place.
2012-11-28 12:38:55 AM  
1 vote:
had the sweetest little old lady lived next to me. had childrens books published, was a noted artist and a talented singer. we would talk for hours about anything and everything. i did little chores for her, whatever. she was one of the smartest people i ever met. i loved her so much and now she's gone. i still cry to think of her.

she left her estate to a nephew two towns over who never once visited her or invited her for holiday in all the years i knew her. he died very young. his wife had the place up for sale in no time for a ridiculous sum and a greedy doosh bought it top dollar before the real estate bubble burst. it was condemned, filled front to back ceiling high with junk, only a small path through the house.

doosh spent a farking fortune restoring the condemned house he over-paid for. meanwhile the real estate greed bubble burst. the restored house has been sitting empty for sale maybe 6 years now.
2012-11-27 11:52:53 PM  
1 vote:
Years ago, I had a similar relationship with an elderly woman in my parish. I lived about four doors down from her, but didn't meet her until my church changed Mass times and she and I ended up going to the same Mass on Saturdays. I used to do small stuff like empty her trash baskets and roll out her garbage bins on Thursdays, light dusting and vacuuming every so often -- that sort of thing. I'd also visit from time to time, just to talk and listen to her stories. Her son lived out of state and saw her about once a year if that, which pained her a great deal. She wasn't rich, and she didn't leave much of an estate, but a couple of months before she died, she gave me a lovely Christmas gift of three handmade quilts: a Bear's Paw, a Double Wedding Ring, and a nine-patch. The Double Wedding Ring was made by her grandmother in 1928 and in pristine condition; the other two were quilts she'd made herself in her youth. I was so very touched; I have them still, and they're some of the best gifts I've ever received.

After she died, her son came to empty out her house and put it up for sale. He left a shoe box on my doorstep while I was at work with odds and ends, mostly old, broken costume jewelry, cracked rosaries, and Mass cards, and a note saying that he'd heard that I took care of his mom, so I could take what I liked from the box and toss the rest, as he'd already removed her "real" jewelry. Asshole. About a year later, when a quilter and quilt appraiser told me that the Double Wedding Ring quilt was worth about $800.00 and the Bear's Paw and nine-patch about $350.00 each, I thought about her son -- and did a happy dance. Pwnd! Mostly I was glad that the quilts survived, because I'm sure that jerk would have tossed them in the trash.
2012-11-27 11:48:58 PM  
1 vote:

weave: There's absolutely no reason for a wealthy person to be shipped off to a nursing home by anyone. You can hire in 24/7 skilled nursing care into their home if needed (and a security guard to watch the care givers to make sure they don't rip off the place).


But that would cut into the inheritance!

Actually, from the article Mrs Gray was doing the duties of a... daughter. Helped the lady live fairly independent, made sure things ran smooth, and kept her in her home until the end.

My grandfather died two weeks ago, leaving behind a decrepit farmhouse that's had a Buffalo suburb grow around it in the past century. My father wants nothing to do with settling the estate, and we expect the old house to be torn down to make a parking lot for the bar next door. He's letting his brothers fight over things, having bought a Cadillac a few weeks before.

/Make the live-in help sign an agreement not to accept any inheritance offered
//But still a sizable retention-until-death bonus from the estate.
2012-11-27 11:39:17 PM  
1 vote:
Not at all. I'm not getting involved.
2012-11-27 11:31:15 PM  
1 vote:
When Mrs Harris died, leaving her estate to neighbour Beatrice Gray, a bitterly fought legal battle ensued with Mrs Harris's niece in the Supreme Court.

/ah yes, the money grubbing relatives step in despite the valid will leaving the property and cash assets to the neighbor who had helped her all those years. The old "she wasn't in her right mind, addled, she had neroupathy of the brain, she was just stupid, she ate cats...i swear." argument. Whatever, you lose you greedy coont. Have fun paying off your fail lawyer.

// Rip nice lady. You had class.
2012-11-27 10:56:19 PM  
1 vote:

Hermit Tard: Anne.Uumellmahaye: I was a cna in high school and helped in the "memory support wing" of the facility I worked for. Dementia and Alzheimer's are biatch diseases from hell. It was truly heart-wrenching to watch people slip in and out of their own minds and they things they said and did to their family members.


I know exactly what you are talking about. My maternal grandfather has dementia and has been in a care facility for the last 3 years. It has been very hard a couple of times when I've gone to visit him and taken my 3 year old nephew with me.

My nephew looks very similar to me when I was his age ( comparing photos of him, myself, my father and my paternal grandfather, it is pretty uncanny how strong the resemblence is). So when we have shown up he has gotten confused, thought my nephew was me and did not recognise me.

/not so CSB


My grandmother isn't full blown Dementia and Alzheimer's...yet...but she forgets really important stuff that makes it hell. She's in home now, a NICE one, but she constantly forgets about it or changes her opinion. On Thanksgiving we were talking (at family functions, she gets about 90% of my time now), and she was telling me all the cool stuff she gets to do there. Field trips, movie days, her own apartment and privacy, sounded like she loved the place. My uncle got the responsibility of driving me home and we had to drop her off. When we got there she exploded how about this "hellish place" that she was miserable there all the time, that they forced her to do this and that they never visit her. She wasn't flip flopping, she honestly didn't remember what she told me earlier. My uncle told me she does this all the time. In addition, those field trips I mentioned (movies, the mall, shopping, etc.) she never takes them up on it, she always demands a family member does it. My mom, who has Fridays off, has gotten the chance to actually enjoy one in quite a while.

Sad all around, and nothing but love for my grandmother, but it is a strain.
2012-11-27 10:47:21 PM  
1 vote:
Popcorn Johnny

I'm going to start buddying up to every old person in my neighborhood.

Or do what Walmart does and take out life insurance policies on all its employees...
2012-11-27 10:23:43 PM  
1 vote:
It'll be a nice addition to neighbors $12 million dollar home.
2012-11-27 10:11:54 PM  
1 vote:
I just spent two weeks taking care of my 92 year old grandmother. She's got maybe a hundred grand and I don't want a penny. I'm 44 and my grams is still around and she might have a hard time getting around, she's pretty sharp. I hope she lives forever. My daughter is 10 and had a great-grandmother. One of a very few kids in her school that can say that. That's farking cool.

Nothing to do with TFA and, yea... I've had a few drinks, but I love my gam-gam.

static2.dmcdn.net

/seriously though, love my grams!
2012-11-27 10:09:25 PM  
1 vote:
I was a cna in high school and helped in the "memory support wing" of the facility I worked for. Dementia and Alzheimer's are biatch diseases from hell. It was truly heart-wrenching to watch people slip in and out of their own minds and they things they said and did to their family members.

Shower days were the worst. Guess how happy an old woman is to see you while she suddenly has no idea who you are and you're alone with her taking her shirt off or washing her hoohoo in a big scary bright white tiled shower room.

/heart and gut wrenching
2012-11-27 10:02:11 PM  
1 vote:
2012-11-27 09:52:10 PM  
1 vote:
It sounds like the niece is truly....BUTTHURTED
 
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