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(Wired)   Mmmmmm...tender, delicious Balrog wings   (wired.com) divider line 39
    More: Cool, Kickstarter, Balrog wings, Heath Dill, dried fruits, tips and tricks, dwarf, supper, raisins  
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4569 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 27 Nov 2012 at 1:40 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-27 01:09:19 PM
The great Balrog wing debate. 

/bleu cheese dressing, obviously
 
2012-11-27 01:14:57 PM
Medium Rare and Back Again will feature 30 recipes for food from the world of J.R.R. Tolkien, plus "pictures, cooking tips and tricks, and witty commentary,"

Ugh...
 
2012-11-27 01:26:13 PM
Precious: The Lord of Jello-ring Cookbooks Based on the Novel "Push" By Sapphire and Influenced by Tolkien's "Led Zep" Period.
 
 
2012-11-27 01:47:47 PM
I like lord of the rings as much as the next guy but c'mon at some point you gotta say "look dude, it's time to get a life and move out from your parents basement"
 
2012-11-27 01:50:23 PM

Der Poopflinger: I like lord of the rings as much as the next guy but c'mon at some point you gotta say "look dude, it's time to get a life and move out from your parents basement"


It's a cookbook dude. Unclench your anus.
 
2012-11-27 01:50:55 PM
The guy calls himself a 'foodie' - a pretentious, I'm-better-that-you, made-up name of there ever was one.

That's enough reason alone to hope he fails.
 
2012-11-27 01:52:45 PM
Page 28:

i.qkme.me

I'll buy it
 
2012-11-27 01:53:13 PM
cdn.wikimg.net
Mmmm... beefy!
 
2012-11-27 01:56:22 PM
Lembas, one small bite will fill the stomach of a grown man
 
2012-11-27 01:59:29 PM
you shall not pass... them out of your colon
 
2012-11-27 02:02:41 PM
Lembas, huh? What is that?

Lembas, also called Waybread in the Common Speech, was a special food made by the elves. The cakes were very nutritious, stayed fresh for months when wrapped in leaves, and were used for sustenance on long journeys. Lembas was a brownish colour on the outside and a cream colour on the inside. Source

Wait a second...

www.popsci.com


My personal recipe for miruvor: mix equal parts limoncello and Five Hour Energy.

Dwarven version: Guinness and espresso.
 
2012-11-27 02:04:07 PM
Sorry, I haven't read the books but I don't associate LOTR with food.

Oh, and most of your American oriented cook books are atrocities. Overly detailed because they know you can't even fake being a chef, and yet lacking details on important things that should be skills that can be glossed over.
 
2012-11-27 02:06:09 PM

wildcardjack: yet lacking details on important things that should be skills that can be glossed over.


I'm sorry, what?
 
2012-11-27 02:12:26 PM
There's an official one for "A Song of Ice and Fire". It looks pretty good and has generally positive reviews on Amazon. A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook
 
2012-11-27 02:13:54 PM
cdn.wikimg.net

/original naming
 
2012-11-27 02:14:57 PM

Sybarite: The great Balrog wing debate. 

/bleu cheese dressing, obviously


The book specifically references the balrogs wings. There is no debate. only an argument between people who can read and people who have no memory.
 
2012-11-27 02:37:16 PM
So just because he's Black you relate him to Fried Chicken? How racist of you!!

i.imgur.com
 
2012-11-27 02:43:31 PM
You must be joking. You're sending a toy into battle?
 
2012-11-27 02:48:40 PM

poisonedpawn78: Sybarite: The great Balrog wing debate. 

/bleu cheese dressing, obviously

The book specifically references the balrogs wings. There is no debate. only an argument between people who can read and people who have no memory.


You may want to go back and re-read the entire passage then.

The book first says 'His enemy halted again, facing him, and the shadow about it reached out like two vast wings.' Metaphors, how do they work? Seriously though, read the link. It has nice "summing up" sections of both arguments. I'll save you the trouble if you really care though, the argument for wings is much weaker than the argument against wings.
 
2012-11-27 03:01:19 PM
Seenow, after you compile a cookbook like that, you need to open a Tolkien themed restaurant...
 
2012-11-27 03:01:50 PM

Night Night Cream Puff: poisonedpawn78: Sybarite: The great Balrog wing debate. 

/bleu cheese dressing, obviously

The book specifically references the balrogs wings. There is no debate. only an argument between people who can read and people who have no memory.

You may want to go back and re-read the entire passage then.

The book first says 'His enemy halted again, facing him, and the shadow about it reached out like two vast wings.' Metaphors, how do they work? Seriously though, read the link. It has nice "summing up" sections of both arguments. I'll save you the trouble if you really care though, the argument for wings is much weaker than the argument against wings.


I believe that this is actually a case of simile, rather than of metaphor. Metaphor would be saying: "His enemy halted again, facing him, and the shadow about it reached out its vast wings." In this case the shadow is like the wings, rather than have a property of wing-ness. In either case those, the Valaraukar would have no wings, and like so much that goes over the head of the literal generation, the text would be using a figure of speech.

In conclusion, Wittgenstein needs a cock-punch.
 
2012-11-27 03:06:38 PM
Eating with Gollum should be a fairly straightforward segment. I assume it largely consists of, "Catch animal. Beat or throttle animal. Enjoy."
 
2012-11-27 03:31:54 PM
Counter-argument to the Balrog wing deniers:

In the Silmarillion, Morgoth and Ungoliant fled from Valinor with the Silmarils. Ungoliant demanded that Morgoth hand them over, so she could devour them. He refused, and she attacked him.

Morgoth summoned the Balrogs from Angband.

"Deep in forgotten places that cry was heard. Far beneath the ruined halls of Angband, in vaults to which the Valar in the haste of their assault had not descended, Balrogs lurked still, awaiting ever the return of their Lord; and now swiftly they arose, and passing over Hithlum they came to Lammoth as a tempest of fire. With their whips of flame they smote asunder the webs of Ungoliant, and she quailed, and turned to flight..."

Here is a map of northern Beleriand:

images1.wikia.nocookie.net

From Angband to Lammoth is a distance of 300-450 miles, which the Balrogs presumably traversed very rapidly. They probably could not have done that by running. The words "arose" and "over" also imply flight.

Now perhaps they flew without wings, like Superman, Red Tornado, or Samurai (the Super Friends Affirmative Action Asian guy). But come on...

Also:

i.imgur.com
 
2012-11-27 03:35:04 PM
 
2012-11-27 03:38:07 PM
I had no idea that Balrog wings was a thing people even argued about until the last LOTR thread. Well done stirring that up again, trollmitter.
 
2012-11-27 03:42:26 PM

Hoboclown: I had no idea that Balrog wings was a thing people even argued about until the last LOTR thread. Well done stirring that up again, trollmitter.


We had this war back on rec.books.tolkien, too. It never goes away. Balrog wings are the Middle-east of Tolkien studies.
 
2012-11-27 03:54:37 PM

Pentaxian: There's an official one for "A Song of Ice and Fire". It looks pretty good and has generally positive reviews on Amazon. A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook


I have it. I've made 4-5 recipes out of it and they were all pretty good. Some of them require some fairly exotic ingredients (e.g., rattlesnake), but most are fairly doable.
 
2012-11-27 03:56:27 PM

Nurglitch:
I believe that this is actually a case of simile, rather than of metaphor. Metaphor would be saying: "His enemy halted again, facing him, and the shadow about it reached out its vast wings." In this case the shadow is like the wings, rather than have a property of wing-ness. In either case those, the Valaraukar would have no wings, and like so much that goes over the head of the literal generation, the text would be using a figure of speech.

In conclusion, Wittgenstein needs a cock-punch.


I was just being cheeky and taking one of the citations from Sybarite's link:
[5] 'metaphor n. application of name or descriptive term or phrase to an object or action to which it is imaginatively but not literally applicable'
The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Current English


I really don't care if you want to call it simile or metaphor as they share similar functions in describing the shadow to be "like wings" and not actual physical wings. I realize we're taught in school that any time "like" is used to describe something to immediately call it a simile which is a safe bet.


phyrkrakr: Sybarite:

poisonedpawn78:

Night Night Cream Puff:

Nurglitch:

[i.qkme.me image 625x268] 

/give it a break, already


You knew it was coming without even clicking the link so why bother posting?
cdn.inquisitr.com
 
2012-11-27 04:32:12 PM

Zavulon: Hoboclown: I had no idea that Balrog wings was a thing people even argued about until the last LOTR thread. Well done stirring that up again, trollmitter.

We had this war back on rec.books.tolkien, too. It never goes away. Balrog wings are the Middle-east of Tolkien studies.


Really, Balrog wings is one of the fundamental arguments that makes up the internet. Without it, the internet would be nothing but half-hearted porn.

/Mike vs Joel would be another one
 
2012-11-27 04:36:41 PM

Parthenogenetic: Counter-argument to the Balrog wing deniers:

In the Silmarillion, Morgoth and Ungoliant fled from Valinor with the Silmarils. Ungoliant demanded that Morgoth hand them over, so she could devour them. He refused, and she attacked him.

Morgoth summoned the Balrogs from Angband.

"Deep in forgotten places that cry was heard. Far beneath the ruined halls of Angband, in vaults to which the Valar in the haste of their assault had not descended, Balrogs lurked still, awaiting ever the return of their Lord; and now swiftly they arose, and passing over Hithlum they came to Lammoth as a tempest of fire. With their whips of flame they smote asunder the webs of Ungoliant, and she quailed, and turned to flight..."

Here is a map of northern Beleriand:

[images1.wikia.nocookie.net image 850x535]

From Angband to Lammoth is a distance of 300-450 miles, which the Balrogs presumably traversed very rapidly. They probably could not have done that by running. The words "arose" and "over" also imply flight.

Now perhaps they flew without wings, like Superman, Red Tornado, or Samurai (the Super Friends Affirmative Action Asian guy). But come on...

Also:

[i.imgur.com image 211x186]


Are you saying it's not believable that a fantasy being can fly without wings? I mean that's absurd, right?

/nerds indeed
 
2012-11-27 04:48:05 PM

kronicfeld: Pentaxian: There's an official one for "A Song of Ice and Fire". It looks pretty good and has generally positive reviews on Amazon. A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook

I have it. I've made 4-5 recipes out of it and they were all pretty good. Some of them require some fairly exotic ingredients (e.g., rattlesnake), but most are fairly doable.


Does it include a recipe for Wyman Manderly's meat pies?
 
2012-11-27 04:49:05 PM

Hoboclown: Does it include a recipe for Wyman Manderly's meat pies?


No, and I was really looking forward to freying some up.
 
2012-11-27 05:12:50 PM
farm4.staticflickr.com
 
2012-11-27 06:42:42 PM
This has nothing to do with LOTR, but because I have a LOTR themed username I'm going to use that as an excuse to post it anyway. Not ten minutes ago, I just finished this delicious plate of filet mignon and rock shrimp. The filet was lightly seasoned with rock salt and black pepper and the rock shrimp was tossed in a man with clarified butter and sauteed garlic. It was the tastiest thing I've eaten in months.

i.imgur.com

I ate it off a paper plate because I am classy. as. fark. 

To be more on-topic, why does one need a kickstarter to write a cookbook? Don't you just, ya know, write it? Or is the money for self-publishing?
 
2012-11-27 06:43:32 PM
err, tossed in a pan, not a man.... then it was tossed into this man, of course.
 
2012-11-27 09:48:40 PM

Pentaxian: There's an official one for "A Song of Ice and Fire". It looks pretty good and has generally positive reviews on Amazon. A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook


Nice. I bet that has some good stuff in it.
 
2012-11-28 01:42:20 AM

Samwise Gamgee: This has nothing to do with LOTR, but because I have a LOTR themed username I'm going to use that as an excuse to post it anyway. Not ten minutes ago, I just finished this delicious plate of filet mignon and rock shrimp. The filet was lightly seasoned with rock salt and black pepper and the rock shrimp was tossed in a man with clarified butter and sauteed garlic. It was the tastiest thing I've eaten in months.

[i.imgur.com image 527x405]

I ate it off a paper plate because I am classy. as. fark. 

To be more on-topic, why does one need a kickstarter to write a cookbook? Don't you just, ya know, write it? Or is the money for self-publishing?


the money thing is a bit suspect, as cost will vary greatly due to content. you can have a cheap-arse plastic ring binder cookbook like church ladies make for a fund raiser. or you can have a hard bound 200 page cookbook loaded with full color photography of every dish. how many books get printed is another obvious variable.
 
2012-11-28 08:42:36 AM
To Serve Hobbit
 
2012-11-28 09:16:53 AM
The toaster in Cave Story?
 
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