If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Audible.com)   Farker Cyclometh is soon going to be a full-time audiobook narrator. He would love it if you gave a listen to some of the titles he has already done   (audible.com) divider line 45
    More: Spiffy, oldest person  
•       •       •

243 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 26 Nov 2012 at 11:07 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



45 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-11-26 05:23:17 PM
And of course any feedback is welcome. I'm working on five more titles, and expect more to come in. And of course, the better they sell, the happier I get. :)
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2012-11-26 05:28:53 PM
Chapter One. In order to manage risk, first we must understand risk...
 
2012-11-26 05:37:47 PM

Cyclometh: And of course any feedback is welcome. I'm working on five more titles, and expect more to come in. And of course, the better they sell, the happier I get. :)


Did you sign an NDA for the titles you're working on or can you divulge their names?

Also, as I can't listen to the audio at work and can't tell from your bio where you're from, do you by chance have a North Atlantic accent of some kind? I'm really looking forward to the next Game of Thrones audiobook but Roy Dotrice sounded a little old and tired in Dance with Dragons and I am fearful that he may not be around for the next one anyway. John Lee did Feast for Crows, but it was...a little weird with him. What I'm saying is that maybe you should do it.
 
2012-11-26 05:39:04 PM
I listen to A LOT of Audio books, I have the big 150$ subscription to Audible.com and I either get the rest from the library or other means...

I work a job that is 12 hours each day, for 3-4 days in a row, and a good portion of that is spent listening to audio books while I work.

Your voice is nice, consistent and somewhat soothing, while at the same time expressing the proper levels of emotion in the various character.

Move away from the mic to take a breath... PLEASE, or edit it out.

I checked out all of your samples, and while its not on all of them, the ones it is on its REALLY there...
 
2012-11-26 05:44:03 PM
Way cool. I've been listening to books on my morning walks for the past couple of years. I'll give them a listen.

I've wondered how that gig works. Editing stutters, burps farts etc. It seems so seamless. However, on the copy of Stranger in a Strange Land that I have you can hear birds chirping. Sounds like Christopher Hurt did some of the work in his living room.

Also, how does one pick the books? A lot of the narrators seem to do the same types of books...Michael Prichard and Tom Clancy books for example.

Good luck with the new gig!
 
2012-11-26 05:45:44 PM
Thanks for the feedback, Raharu. The way Audible compresses the samples doesn't help, and my technique has improved quite a bit since most of these were recorded. Also, my equipment and studio space have vastly improved- but it is something I will try to give more attention to.

Again, thanks for the honest feedback. I do appreciate it and hope you'll give a listen to either one of these or some of my future titles.
 
2012-11-26 05:48:37 PM

exick: Cyclometh: And of course any feedback is welcome. I'm working on five more titles, and expect more to come in. And of course, the better they sell, the happier I get. :)

Did you sign an NDA for the titles you're working on or can you divulge their names?

Also, as I can't listen to the audio at work and can't tell from your bio where you're from, do you by chance have a North Atlantic accent of some kind? I'm really looking forward to the next Game of Thrones audiobook but Roy Dotrice sounded a little old and tired in Dance with Dragons and I am fearful that he may not be around for the next one anyway. John Lee did Feast for Crows, but it was...a little weird with him. What I'm saying is that maybe you should do it.


Well, I can't talk about titles in production, but my name is on the ones I have done.

I have a general American accent, not North Atlantic. And I don't get to pick the titles I do (yet)- those kinds of books you mention are WAY out of my league at the moment in terms of my career positon. But one day, sure. :)
 
2012-11-26 05:52:58 PM

Dancin_In_Anson: Way cool. I've been listening to books on my morning walks for the past couple of years. I'll give them a listen.

I've wondered how that gig works. Editing stutters, burps farts etc. It seems so seamless. However, on the copy of Stranger in a Strange Land that I have you can hear birds chirping. Sounds like Christopher Hurt did some of the work in his living room.

Also, how does one pick the books? A lot of the narrators seem to do the same types of books...Michael Prichard and Tom Clancy books for example.

Good luck with the new gig!


Thanks! The process is by audition or for higher-end titles, via agents. The recording process is fairly straightforward; most narrators use a punch and roll technique, and then an editor, sometimes the same person as the narrator, edits the recording to remove all the stuff you don't want to hear. There's varying techniques for tracking the errors and stuff, depending on skill and the software one uses to record.

After that, it's sent for proofing and then to the distributor, like Audible.
 
2012-11-26 05:54:29 PM
You have a lovely story-teller's voice. If you ever run a D&D campaign, I want in.
 
2012-11-26 06:03:28 PM

Cyclometh: I have a general American accent, not North Atlantic. And I don't get to pick the titles I do (yet)- those kinds of books you mention are WAY out of my league at the moment in terms of my career positon. But one day, sure. :)


I was kidding, of course, about doing GoT. But seriously, good luck to you.
 
2012-11-26 06:05:20 PM
Up next: The hot chick who was Italian, or maybe some kind of Spanish.
 
2012-11-26 06:09:01 PM

vartian: You have a lovely story-teller's voice. If you ever run a D&D campaign, I want in.


Very kind of you to say, thanks!

exick:

I was kidding, of course, about doing GoT. But seriously, good luck to you.


Heh, thanks. :) I love most of the stuff I get to do, and I really look forward to the day when I can be tapped for bestsellers like that. Helps to be a huge SF and fantasy nerd.
 
2012-11-26 06:09:58 PM
The questions on the process are (to me anyway) can be more interesting than questions about the books.

It's funny what goes through your head around mile 5..."He's got the characters down" (Hurt doing Jubal Harshaw for example). "I wonder how many times do he read the book before...reading it."
 
2012-11-26 06:14:39 PM

Dancin_In_Anson: The questions on the process are (to me anyway) can be more interesting than questions about the books.

It's funny what goes through your head around mile 5..."He's got the characters down" (Hurt doing Jubal Harshaw for example). "I wonder how many times do he read the book before...reading it."


Most read the book once. Some even do cold reads- you'd be surprised how effective that can be, but I always read it at least once, so I know how to say words, establish character voices and avoid the classic trap of reading a character for an entire novel using a sonorous basso voice, only to have the last chapter say "... he said in his usual nasal whine."
 
2012-11-26 06:15:26 PM
After listening to your recordings, I have to admit you are far more energetic than your brother, Cyclomeh.
 
2012-11-26 06:21:32 PM

Cyclometh: avoid the classic trap of reading a character for an entire novel using a sonorous basso voice, only to have the last chapter say "... he said in his usual nasal whine."


Hahahaha! I can see that happening. That's the kind of thing that rattles around in my head when I'm listening. I wonder how the narrator came up with....Sometimes I even have to scroll back a few minutes to get back on plot.
 
2012-11-26 06:31:06 PM

Dancin_In_Anson: Cyclometh: avoid the classic trap of reading a character for an entire novel using a sonorous basso voice, only to have the last chapter say "... he said in his usual nasal whine."

Hahahaha! I can see that happening. That's the kind of thing that rattles around in my head when I'm listening. I wonder how the narrator came up with....Sometimes I even have to scroll back a few minutes to get back on plot.


It's a balancing act; you have to evoke the character without overdoing it- it's not like acting for a film or animation, in that you have to suggest the character voice without overdoing it and sounding cartoonish, a caricature, or going out of your voice's range.

For example, when people listen to my books they have to be able to hear a woman's voice when I do a female character, but I will never sound like a woman. (Some books use multiple voices, I have not worked on a project like that yet)

So I collaborate with the listener by creating a consistent voice that evokes the sound and tries not to put me between the listener and the copy.

In the end, it's an audio book, not an audio movie. :) And it's a craft I will likely never stop working at getting better at.
 
2012-11-26 08:17:35 PM

Raharu: Move away from the mic to take a breath... PLEASE, or edit it out.


t.fod4.com
Approves
 
2012-11-26 08:42:01 PM
Would you mind reading a chemistry text?
 
2012-11-26 08:59:51 PM
Oooh c'mon Cyclo, say "Titty Sprinkles" for me!
 
2012-11-26 09:07:37 PM
I'm an idiot and can't seem to find the samples.
 
So my review is "sounds good to me."
 
2012-11-26 09:31:42 PM

Cyclometh: And of course any feedback is welcome. I'm working on five more titles, and expect more to come in. And of course, the better they sell, the happier I get. :)


Cool! I have one of those Morgan Freeman (except nowhere near as cool) deep voices and am always told to consider doing this. Especially since the days of the radio DJ are dead.

My goal is to record Moby Dick over a two day span while drunk. The book, not the drum solo.

Anyway, congrats!
 
2012-11-26 09:33:26 PM
Damn, you have a great voice and rhythm. This is good work, man.
 
2012-11-26 09:43:24 PM
I want to hear you say the following:

Somewhere out there in the vast nothingness of space...
Somewhere far away in space and time..
Staring upwards at the gleaming stars in the obsidian sky

We're marooned on a small island,
In an endless sea,
Confined to a tiny spit of sand,
Unable to escape

But tonight, on this small planet
On earth, we're going to rock civilization

/you sound kind of like the narrator from Pendulum "slam"
//which is good
 
2012-11-26 10:15:07 PM
Now that this is going green, I will be less snarky and more serious, and congratulate Cyclometh. :D
 
2012-11-26 10:17:52 PM

Donnchadha: Would you mind reading a chemistry text?


If I get paid, no problem! ;)

Actually, I specialize in medical and long-form narration of very technical topics, so that would be right up my alley.
 
2012-11-26 10:19:41 PM

dickfreckle: Damn, you have a great voice and rhythm. This is good work, man.


Thank you!
 
2012-11-26 10:20:34 PM

Snarfangel: Now that this is going green, I will be less snarky and more serious, and congratulate Cyclometh. :D


Aw, thanks. ;)
 
2012-11-26 10:24:18 PM

brap: I'm an idiot and can't seem to find the samples.
 
So my review is "sounds good to me."


The samples are right under the title images, a little orange arrow that turns green when you play it. :)
 
2012-11-27 12:24:44 AM
Grats on the full-time gig!
 
2012-11-27 02:09:48 AM

Joe Six-Keg: Grats on the full-time gig!


Thank you very much! It's something I wanted to do for a long time but in a way circumstances have forced me into it- freelancing as a narrator will be both fun and challenging.
 
2012-11-27 04:45:42 AM
Awesome voice, Cyclometh. :-)
 
2012-11-27 08:52:56 AM
Friend of mine (my oldest friend, I've known him for *coughsneezehack* years) is a VO artist. He makes a crapload of money doing it. Best of luck, Cyclo. The job you did for GJTB was awesome.
 
2012-11-27 10:39:54 AM

Cyclometh: Donnchadha: Would you mind reading a chemistry text?

If I get paid, no problem! ;)

Actually, I specialize in medical and long-form narration of very technical topics, so that would be right up my alley.


Live the dream, Cyclometh!

I'm still pushing into IVR and recordings through my company. I'd love to do what you're doing. If you can recommend an agent to me, I'd love to get a little more outside exposure.
 
2012-11-27 01:48:13 PM
I've been postponing looking into VO work because I work at an ad agency that's a union signatory shop (so that we can bid on government work) - as in, we can only use union VO, and because I'm an employee, I can't join the union. I've done placeholder work for some projects, and some non-commercial work for training use.

But I'd like to get started on some home practice. My eyes are slowly getting worse and my voice is slowly getting better and I'd like to sharpen what I can to keep . I've been eyeballing a Yeti regular because I don't have any sound engineering experience to think I'd get use out of the board on the Pro.

Does anyone have any recommendations for hardware at a better cost/ratio than that, or any good places to look for NON-union VO work that can be handled online? Most of what I do is character work, but I want to get a handle on more straight read tones.

I think the only sample I have online is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvObsh_2-_0 but that's just running through a crappy onboard mic.
 
2012-11-27 02:16:30 PM
Raharu
Move away from the mic to take a breath... PLEASE, or edit it out.


Or if you have too much spit and need to swallow.
I didn't check the samples, so it might not apply; but it took 3 or 4 Harry Dresden books until someone gave James Marsters a mute button, stopped him from doing it or edited out his breathing and swallowing.
 
2012-11-27 03:21:21 PM

The Voice of Doom: Raharu
Move away from the mic to take a breath... PLEASE, or edit it out.

Or if you have too much spit and need to swallow.
I didn't check the samples, so it might not apply; but it took 3 or 4 Harry Dresden books until someone gave James Marsters a mute button, stopped him from doing it or edited out his breathing and swallowing.


Definitely edited, not muted. Even the best gear and studio has some "room tone" that should be playing when the speaker is quiet. Muted audio sounds weird; you can tell when it's been gated or muted. But swallowing noises and other extaneous sounds? That should be right out no matter what.

As to breath control, it's a balancing act. At one extreme, your breathing is distracting, at the other it sounds as though you have no lungs. Breathing is part of the narrative, but getting it just right is part of the craft.
 
2012-11-27 06:59:30 PM
I revisited this.
 
Good jorb.
 
I like reading to my friend's kids but I can't imagine doing anything weightier than Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs.  Do you do this in mulitple takes?  Do you do dubs if you stumble on a sentence or word?
 
This is fascinating stuff.
 
2012-11-27 07:19:17 PM

brap: I revisited this.
 
Good jorb.
 
I like reading to my friend's kids but I can't imagine doing anything weightier than Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs.  Do you do this in mulitple takes?  Do you do dubs if you stumble on a sentence or word?
 
This is fascinating stuff.


It's generally done by the narrator recording the whole thing using punch and roll or a similar technique. This rough edit is then listened to by a proofer who notes errors, awkward bits, noises and all that. The narrator records corrections (usually a sentence or paragraph; whatever can be slotted in while sounding natural) and the editor puts it all together and removes all the clicks, excess breaths and so forth.


Lastly, a QC pass is done, and any further corrections made.
 
2012-11-27 11:52:45 PM
Sounds great Cyclometh!
One question: How does a feller with a decent speaking voice and a general American accent break into this sort of gig? Not picky. I'll read Jack Chick tracts if it pays minimum wage.
Do you just send out audition tapes to people? If so, to whom?
Ummm...
What I really meant to say was three questions.
 
2012-11-27 11:59:04 PM

Cyclometh: For example, when people listen to my books they have to be able to hear a woman's voice when I do a female character, but I will never sound like a woman. (Some books use multiple voices, I have not worked on a project like that yet)


Have you tried Helium?
Congrats on the full time gig!
 
2012-11-28 02:42:45 AM

TsarTom: Sounds great Cyclometh!
One question: How does a feller with a decent speaking voice and a general American accent break into this sort of gig? Not picky. I'll read Jack Chick tracts if it pays minimum wage.
Do you just send out audition tapes to people? If so, to whom?
Ummm...
What I really meant to say was three questions.


Well, it's a lot more than just a good voice. There's a very long-running joke in the VO business about the guy or gal with the great voice. :)

That said, if you have the chops- meaning you can read engagingly, create the scene, act the characters and create the emotions on the page, and do it consistently, it might be worth looking into. You won't get rich at it; you might see people telling you that you can make $150 or $200 per finished hour (or more!)- what they don't tell you is that it takes 1.5 hours to make one hour of rough-edited audio- if you're REALLY good. And then you have to edit and proof it- so by the time you're done you spent four hours on one hour of finished audio. Or maybe you pay someone to proof and edit, but that eats up close to half your per-hour fee right off the top.

You'd also need the right equipment; you don't have to take out a second mortgage but good equipment and the right space is going to cost you a bit of coin. Also, it's a LOT of work, and you kind of have to love it to do it. It takes a lot of stamina to sit in a chair and just read for two, three- four hours.

One place to start, if you're serious, is librivox- they do public domain audiobooks. Another is ACX (acx.com), that's Audible's site for audiobook pros and rights holders to sync up and get stuff done.
 
2012-11-28 03:35:00 PM
Hey Cyclo!

Just saw this today. Hubby and I are both huge audiobook listeners. We go through 3-4 titles a week while we drive. I'll get right on it. :)

Best of luck to you, you definitely have the (sexy) voice for it. I found that out during GJTB.

The Spork
 
2012-11-28 09:11:50 PM

KarmaSpork: Hey Cyclo!

Just saw this today. Hubby and I are both huge audiobook listeners. We go through 3-4 titles a week while we drive. I'll get right on it. :)

Best of luck to you, you definitely have the (sexy) voice for it. I found that out during GJTB.

The Spork


Sweet, thanks! And let me know what you think, as much as authors love feedback, so do narrators. :)
 
2012-11-28 11:59:57 PM
Shoot me an email. (EIP)

Let me guess, though... the first one you did was My Soul to Keep. Yes?

I have a few ideas, if you'd like to hear them. This is solely from the listener p.o.v. , but I have heard thousands of books and literally hundreds of narrators. Have you heard Nick Podell? (sp?)

-Spork
 
Displayed 45 of 45 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report