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(Computerworld)   HP says its products sold unknowingly to Syria by partner. Oopsie   (computerworld.com) divider line 27
    More: Unlikely, horsepower  
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773 clicks; posted to Business » on 26 Nov 2012 at 2:13 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-26 02:24:57 PM  
Are there any maps available to show where this light treason may have occurred?
 
2012-11-26 02:24:57 PM  
As it seems that HP seem pretty clueless as to what the companies they buy and what products they sell, this isn't really too much of a stretch. If it was IBM or MS, I would not believe the incompetence defense so easily.
 
2012-11-26 02:26:05 PM  
Oh no, they'll gain access to our critical printing technologies!
 
2012-11-26 02:27:21 PM  

Lost Thought 00: Oh no, they'll gain access to our critical printing technologies!


Forget cornering the yellow cake or sweet crude markets, they are after printer ink!
 
2012-11-26 02:28:47 PM  

wingnut396: As it seems that HP seem pretty clueless as to what the companies they buy and what products they sell, this isn't really too much of a stretch. If it was IBM or MS, I would not believe the incompetence defense so easily.


Except that its nearly impossible to control where your products end up once they've been shipped.
 
2012-11-26 02:33:41 PM  
Conveniently pre-installed flame software in every "accidental" computer sale to Syria?
 
2012-11-26 02:34:35 PM  
Dude, let it slide. It's HP, they need the sales. Maybe you should give HP a permit to sell to North Korea and Iran as well.
 
2012-11-26 02:35:29 PM  

Lost Thought 00: Oh no, they'll gain access to our critical printing technologies!


No printer ink for oil.


I know, Syria has limited oil reserves.
 
2012-11-26 02:40:09 PM  

gingerjet: wingnut396: As it seems that HP seem pretty clueless as to what the companies they buy and what products they sell, this isn't really too much of a stretch. If it was IBM or MS, I would not believe the incompetence defense so easily.

Except that its nearly impossible to control where your products end up once they've been shipped.


Uh...not really.
 
2012-11-26 02:46:39 PM  
So how much HP stock does Clinton hold ?
 
2012-11-26 02:55:16 PM  

wingnut396: Lost Thought 00: Oh no, they'll gain access to our critical printing technologies!

Forget cornering the yellow cake or sweet crude markets, they are after printer ink!


Printer ink is about $84,000 a barrel, retail. It's a much better market to get into.
 
2012-11-26 03:06:26 PM  

wildcardjack: Dude, let it slide. It's HP, they need the sales. Maybe you should give HP a permit to sell to North Korea and Iran as well.


Aren't there enough crimes against humanity being committed these days?
 
2012-11-26 03:16:57 PM  
i236.photobucket.com

PC LOAD LETTER??!!!?!11?
 
2012-11-26 03:26:08 PM  
To be fair, my understanding is that HP sold the hardware to an Italian company that did defense contracting work for various NATO military intel groups. I can see how you'd assume those blade servers you sold them were just going to end up in some NATO base somewhere. It's not like they sold them to some blatantly false store front.

About all HP could do to prevent this would be to have some kind of setup in the hardware that controlled activation based on location. Be it something in the firmware or a physical circuit. The issue there though is the CIA, NSA, likely wouldn't like since it would open the door for other monitoring.
 
2012-11-26 04:10:12 PM  
On the positive side, this should distract attention from last week's Autonomy fiasco.
 
2012-11-26 04:35:44 PM  
Meg Whitman overheard saying, "At least someone is buying our sheit."
 
2012-11-26 05:50:12 PM  
Eddie Adams from Torrance: Winner winner, chicken dinner.
 
2012-11-26 06:14:06 PM  

wingnut396: As it seems that HP seem pretty clueless as to what the companies they buy and what products they sell, this isn't really too much of a stretch. If it was IBM or MS, I would not believe the incompetence defense so easily.


I'm more inclined to believe "evil", instead of "stupid", with HP because they're under pressure to sell at this point. Find a willing third party, sell equipment to them, watch the third party sell that equipment to sanctioned countries, and run with that whole "plausible deniability" bit.

Sorry - if your subsidiary breaks the law, you're on the hook. Period. That's the only way to prevent this kind of thing from proliferating. Otherwise, it's all too easy to wash your hands of that subsidiary and walk away, especially if that subsidiary isn't bound by U.S. law and can therefore ignore such sanctions with impunity.
 
2012-11-26 06:20:55 PM  
No wonder that country has gone to crap.
 
2012-11-26 10:24:38 PM  

mcreadyblue: gingerjet: wingnut396: As it seems that HP seem pretty clueless as to what the companies they buy and what products they sell, this isn't really too much of a stretch. If it was IBM or MS, I would not believe the incompetence defense so easily.

Except that its nearly impossible to control where your products end up once they've been shipped.

Uh...not really.


Um, really. The Italian partner (not subsidiary, but another company that dealt primarily with HP hardware and got discounts for the exclusivity) had agreed to export constraints, but broke the agreement by shipping them off to Syria after acquiring the parts from HP.

Exactly how was HP supposed to track this? This is not much different than the agreements YOU make when using a browser with US export-restricted encryption, or a color printer capable of printing counterfeit documents; if you break the law with their equipment, how, in any practical manner, is the company that sold these things to you responsible? There is a practical limit to what these companies can do... and in this case, HP did that. The Italian company Area blatantly broke the agreement (and the law) by dealing with Syria.

Hanging HP's name on this whole thing is a big red herring. It could have just as easily been Dell or IBM equipment. What the article is basically stating is that it was determined that HP was not a direct party and had no knowledge of the illegal transfer of technology.
 
2012-11-26 10:54:05 PM  

LesserEvil: mcreadyblue: gingerjet: wingnut396: As it seems that HP seem pretty clueless as to what the companies they buy and what products they sell, this isn't really too much of a stretch. If it was IBM or MS, I would not believe the incompetence defense so easily.

Except that its nearly impossible to control where your products end up once they've been shipped.

Uh...not really.

Um, really. The Italian partner (not subsidiary, but another company that dealt primarily with HP hardware and got discounts for the exclusivity) had agreed to export constraints, but broke the agreement by shipping them off to Syria after acquiring the parts from HP.


I cant even put in a no-HP toner or ink cartridge without HP knowing about it.
 
2012-11-26 11:11:41 PM  
Give management or executive staff at HP any latitude and they will immediately go full retard.

There is nothing they can not screw up. They would even screw up gravity if they fell off a building.

As far as the "evil" comment, well, as I've said before, statistically, God hates stupid people; therefore, stupid is ultimate evil.
 
2012-11-26 11:52:07 PM  

gingerjet: wingnut396: As it seems that HP seem pretty clueless as to what the companies they buy and what products they sell, this isn't really too much of a stretch. If it was IBM or MS, I would not believe the incompetence defense so easily.

Except that its nearly impossible to control where your products end up once they've been shipped.


As it certainly should be!
 
2012-11-27 12:46:40 AM  

wingnut396: As it seems that HP seem pretty clueless as to what the companies they buy and what products they sell, this isn't really too much of a stretch. If it was IBM or MS, I would not believe the incompetence defense so easily.


You know who else bought hardware from IBM?
 
2012-11-27 12:48:19 AM  
They received export controlled technology, but they will eventually have to call HP tech support.

It kind of balances things out.
 
2012-11-27 05:53:38 AM  
www.cartoonstock.com
 
2012-11-27 06:06:27 AM  

FormlessOne: wingnut396: As it seems that HP seem pretty clueless as to what the companies they buy and what products they sell, this isn't really too much of a stretch. If it was IBM or MS, I would not believe the incompetence defense so easily.

I'm more inclined to believe "evil", instead of "stupid", with HP because they're under pressure to sell at this point. Find a willing third party, sell equipment to them, watch the third party sell that equipment to sanctioned countries, and run with that whole "plausible deniability" bit.

Sorry - if your subsidiary breaks the law, you're on the hook. Period. That's the only way to prevent this kind of thing from proliferating. Otherwise, it's all too easy to wash your hands of that subsidiary and walk away, especially if that subsidiary isn't bound by U.S. law and can therefore ignore such sanctions with impunity.


Yeah whatever.

But how is this relevant, given that no subsidiary was involved?
 
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