Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Salon)   Should churches be used as polling places? Probably not if they have banners hanging outside the entrance that read, "Strengthen Marriage, Don't Redefine It," in states voting on same-sex marriage laws   (salon.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, United Methodist Church, polling places, North Carolina, state board of elections, Daily Camera, Humanist associations, Minnesota Public Radio, voter intimidation  
•       •       •

1344 clicks; posted to Politics » on 26 Nov 2012 at 11:50 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



152 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2012-11-26 08:48:56 AM  
Unless doing so costs them their tax-exempt status and leads to their immediately having to pony up 30% of their income in direct taxation, plus having to complete an obscene amount of paperwork in triplicate. Then I'm all for it.

/ you act like a political organization, you need to be taxed like a political organization
 
2012-11-26 08:49:08 AM  
I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.
 
2012-11-26 09:25:06 AM  
in this area, we didn't have any issues with using local churches as polling places. some of the poll workers might have been snippy but the churches themselves were pretty accommodating when it came to making the whole process as neutral as possible. election day went rather smoothly in Pennsylvania.
 
2012-11-26 09:33:26 AM  

Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.


Probably because churches tend to be one of the few buildings in those areas large enough to handle voter crowds, and not in much use on Tuesdays.

But yeah. Not a fan. (Hereabouts, most polling places are at local schools.)
 
2012-11-26 09:37:35 AM  
The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis called the incidents an oversight, and the signs came down by midday on Election Day.

Willful acts that take thought, planning, and execution are now "oversights". Got it.
 
2012-11-26 09:41:43 AM  

abb3w: Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.

Probably because churches tend to be one of the few buildings in those areas large enough to handle voter crowds, and not in much use on Tuesdays.

But yeah. Not a fan. (Hereabouts, most polling places are at local schools.)


Pretty much this. In a rural area, you pretty much have to pick between a church or the local elementary school. My polling place is a church...or rather, the little 1-room block fellowship hall beside the church that smelled vaguely of old carpet, old ladies, and many a pot-luck dinners from Sundays past.
 
2012-11-26 09:44:58 AM  
Yeah, taking down anything deemed "political" seems like a no brainer, but you're bound to get crazies claiming that a cross on the wall is political; or even holding it in a school, as if to say "look at what these tax and spend liberals spent your hard earned money on". So, I can see where the situation gets needlessly complicated if you start going down that slope.

The display was outside the 100-foot buffer zone required by Colorado law, but even if the display was legal, Boulder County officials have decided to no longer use the church as a polling place, according to the Daily Camera.

Sounds like a fair resolution to this isolated incident.
 
2012-11-26 09:46:46 AM  
I'm not a huge fan of them being used as polling places but there are times there isn't much choice. They used to use my work as one and it was very inconvenient not only for us but for the workers and voters. The next best place nearby happened to be a church so they moved the precinct there
 
2012-11-26 09:47:13 AM  

kid_icarus: you pretty much have to pick between a church or the local elementary school


I'd greatly prefer it if they kept schools open on election day. Stop short changing our kids out of a day of education just because people were too lazy to go vote during the 2 week long early voting period prior to "election day".

Here in Austin they set up trailers with early voting booths in grocery store parking lots, among other places. Pro-vegetable propaganda was everywhere!
 
2012-11-26 09:50:04 AM  
I don't think churches are the best option but I can live with it. Never had a problem when I had to vote at one.

Except the time we lost power. I was biting my tongue so hard it bled, resisting the urge to yell, "Where is your God now?!"

I blame you, Fark.
 
2012-11-26 10:15:40 AM  
Do churches (and everywhere else) get paid for being a voting precinct?
 
2012-11-26 10:16:47 AM  

serial_crusher: Here in Austin they set up trailers with early voting booths in grocery store parking lots, among other places. Pro-vegetable propaganda was everywhere!


Yeah, my early voting location in N Austin was always the Randall's grocery store. About the only time their parking lot ever got close to full...
 
2012-11-26 10:21:34 AM  
So these places willfully commited federal crimes by breaking election laws, and they have admitted to doing such on national media as an "oversight?"

So, why hasn't anyone been charged with election tampering yet for this?

/I think we know the answer...
 
2012-11-26 10:23:38 AM  

Diogenes: I don't think churches are the best option but I can live with it. Never had a problem when I had to vote at one.


In Oklahoma it's the best option. There is at least one on every street corner and they arnt doing anything during the week. Well maybe Wednesday night.
 
2012-11-26 10:23:51 AM  

serial_crusher: I'd greatly prefer it if they kept schools open on election day. Stop short changing our kids out of a day of education just because people were too lazy to go vote during the 2 week long early voting period prior to "election day".


CT has no early voting, so I'm sort of fascinated by the whole early voting thing. It was such a huge deal this year (for the first time I can really remember) and its sort of defeats the purpose of election day, doesn't it? I have always been aware of absentee ballots, but I did not know there were actual polling places open for weeks at a time before election day. I thought you had to have a very good reason (military, college in another state, etc.) to vote anywhere but your designated polling place, on election day.

When I was a kid, they had voting in our school cafeteria. We had lunch in our classrooms and got something special, like pizza from a local place on that day. I suppose it worked out for everyone. We certainly liked the treat.
 
2012-11-26 10:32:37 AM  

serpent_sky: serial_crusher: I'd greatly prefer it if they kept schools open on election day. Stop short changing our kids out of a day of education just because people were too lazy to go vote during the 2 week long early voting period prior to "election day".

CT has no early voting, so I'm sort of fascinated by the whole early voting thing. It was such a huge deal this year (for the first time I can really remember) and its sort of defeats the purpose of election day, doesn't it? I have always been aware of absentee ballots, but I did not know there were actual polling places open for weeks at a time before election day. I thought you had to have a very good reason (military, college in another state, etc.) to vote anywhere but your designated polling place, on election day.


Yeah, I think the idea of tethering people to a certain polling place was an artifact of the fact that local ballots looked different and with physical sheets of paper you couldn't represent multiple ballots in the same location without it turning into a madhouse. But, with electronic voting, it doesn't matter. I check in at the front desk and they give me a code that I enter into the machine and it shows the applicable ballot for my area.

I don't get the existence of "voting day" either. Here they actually have like a week off between "early voting" and "voting day". I kind of just feel like polls should be open the whole month of October, and leave it at that.

Don't really get why anybody would oppose early voting.
 
2012-11-26 10:41:55 AM  

serial_crusher: Yeah, I think the idea of tethering people to a certain polling place was an artifact of the fact that local ballots looked different and with physical sheets of paper you couldn't represent multiple ballots in the same location without it turning into a madhouse. But, with electronic voting, it doesn't matter. I check in at the front desk and they give me a code that I enter into the machine and it shows the applicable ballot for my area.

I don't get the existence of "voting day" either. Here they actually have like a week off between "early voting" and "voting day". I kind of just feel like polls should be open the whole month of October, and leave it at that.

Don't really get why anybody would oppose early voting.


The only reason I can see opposing early voting is, if you vote October 1st and the polls close November 1st, anything could happen in that month -- and there is no way to change your vote if information comes to light that genuinely changes you mind (even if it is just to abstain from voting or voting "no confidence." It's not as if people stop campaigning or things cease happening in that month. THAT said, anything can happen the day after a single election day, so I guess it's not that huge of a deal.

We still have paper ballots here, though. We go to tables with dividers and write on them with markers, then put them into a scanner by the door. It's nothing like the cloaked booths I remember from going with my mom when I was a kid (Queens, NY - I have no idea what voting is like there now, I moved when I turned 18). To kid me, though, they seemed really high tech and official. And yet. Stamford is a pretty big east coast city (desperately trying to become Manhattan North) to have simple paper ballots.

Rather than worrying about election day or early voting, I'd rather see a push for standardized ballots. And I guess some assurance that the ballots are actually counted as entered, though there is probably no way to prove that paper or electronic.
 
2012-11-26 11:36:22 AM  

Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places.


Like the stupid banners are going to change someone's minds right at the last minute?
 
2012-11-26 11:56:09 AM  

Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.


I have no problem with the church's physical facilities being used as a polling place. However, the church should be subject to the same bans on electioneering as anyplace else.
 
2012-11-26 11:56:18 AM  
Churches make fine polling places. There are already laws on the books in all states saying that they need to cover up their religious hate-speech, but that's pretty simple to do.

I'm guessing $10 worth of sheets and $1.00 worth of duct tape would sanitize most churches.
 
2012-11-26 11:56:31 AM  
Did anything happen to that group of evangelicals who gave the finger to the IRS by videotaping themselves endorsing candidates in front of their congregations?
 
2012-11-26 11:57:22 AM  
aren't all churches portals to HELL?
 
2012-11-26 11:58:57 AM  
You kids should really try this Vote By Mail thing. All the cool states are doing it.
 
2012-11-26 11:59:27 AM  
That's electioneering, isn't it? I mean, I am not an expert, but if a school has to cover up an Obama mural, one would think they'd have to remove those banners.
 
2012-11-26 12:01:00 PM  

Jon iz teh kewl: aren't all churches portals to HELL?


Yeah, but make sure you stop by for coffee and sweet rolls in the narthex first.
 
2012-11-26 12:02:26 PM  
Trolls are slipping.. we're like 20+ posts in and no Obama mural.
 
2012-11-26 12:02:41 PM  

serial_crusher: Yeah, taking down anything deemed "political" seems like a no brainer, but you're bound to get crazies claiming that a cross on the wall is political; or even holding it in a school, as if to say "look at what these tax and spend liberals spent your hard earned money on". So, I can see where the situation gets needlessly complicated if you start going down that slope.

The display was outside the 100-foot buffer zone required by Colorado law, but even if the display was legal, Boulder County officials have decided to no longer use the church as a polling place, according to the Daily Camera.

Sounds like a fair resolution to this isolated incident.


This is why it pays to read the article....
 
2012-11-26 12:03:51 PM  
"Erecting the 'wall of separation between church and state,' therefore, is absolutely essential in a free society." ― Thomas Jefferson

/Churches should not be used as polling places.
 
2012-11-26 12:05:58 PM  

kid_icarus: abb3w: Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.

Probably because churches tend to be one of the few buildings in those areas large enough to handle voter crowds, and not in much use on Tuesdays.

But yeah. Not a fan. (Hereabouts, most polling places are at local schools.)

Pretty much this. In a rural area, you pretty much have to pick between a church or the local elementary school. My polling place is a church...or rather, the little 1-room block fellowship hall beside the church that smelled vaguely of old carpet, old ladies, and many a pot-luck dinners from Sundays past.


I heard the principal of my kids elementary school say she was glad that the district finally got rid of all the polling places in the school. She said they create a security risk. The schools are no admission without check in and photograph the rest of the year, they hated opening up the building to the general public.
 
2012-11-26 12:06:14 PM  

Headso: Trolls are slipping.. we're like 20+ posts in and no Obama mural.


I don't think it is trollish to mention that in this context. Who cares if a Church is being used as a polling place as long as it adheres to the rules against politicking? This banner and that mural would both fail that test.
 
2012-11-26 12:07:55 PM  

Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.


They're big buildings that are usually empty. I'd prefer voting in a church. They're usually easier to get to than obscure government buildings. I have to vote in some godforsaken senior center in the middle of nowhere.
 
2012-11-26 12:09:01 PM  
How about we just give them all the rope they want for now, eh?
 
2012-11-26 12:10:21 PM  

serial_crusher: kid_icarus: you pretty much have to pick between a church or the local elementary school

I'd greatly prefer it if they kept schools open on election day. Stop short changing our kids out of a day of education just because people were too lazy to go vote during the 2 week long early voting period prior to "election day".

Here in Austin they set up trailers with early voting booths in grocery store parking lots, among other places. Pro-vegetable propaganda was everywhere!


Ah, so you admit they're in the pocket of Big Eggplant!
 
2012-11-26 12:10:59 PM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: "Erecting the 'wall of separation between church and state,' therefore, is absolutely essential in a free society." ― Thomas Jefferson

/Churches should not be used as polling places.


If anyone lets the wrath of god influence their voting they should probably just stay home. There's no real reason we even need physical polling places with pathetic hours. Who's available 10-4 on a weekday to go vote? I should be able to vote at home or on a machine at a 24 hour grocery.
 
2012-11-26 12:14:01 PM  

serial_crusher: Yeah, taking down anything deemed "political" seems like a no brainer, but you're bound to get crazies claiming that a cross on the wall is political; or even holding it in a school, as if to say "look at what these tax and spend liberals spent your hard earned money on". So, I can see where the situation gets needlessly complicated if you start going down that slope.


Interesting... I mean, at least every other election if not more has school-related stuff on the ballot. We do mail-in here and I haven't been to polling place in years... I wonder if schools putting up stuff in this regard is ever an issue.
 
2012-11-26 12:15:38 PM  

Insatiable Jesus: How about we just give them all the rope they want for now, eh?


Because they have already had more than enough and it's not enough to hang them because they scream persecution the second anyone says anything.

I really would love to see all the churches lose their tax-exempt status, since they're not staying out of politics either way, and the country could use the money. But see above: persecution.
 
2012-11-26 12:16:16 PM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: "Erecting the 'wall of separation between church and state,' therefore, is absolutely essential in a free society." ― Thomas Jefferson

/Churches should not be used as polling places.


I'm pretty sure that wall was meant to be figurative.
 
2012-11-26 12:17:26 PM  
We brought this up with the ACLU in Anchorage many years ago.

There was a gay rights initiative that was supposed to appear on the ballot. All the right-wing churches marched all over town with their crosses and other religious symbolism to fight it. First Amendment groups (of which I was a part) argued that the use of religion to argue laws made all of those symbols into electioneering, and that for this issue, all similar symbols had to be removed from polling places.

It was removed from the ballot before the election for some reason I don't recall -- but the ACLU worked to set up poll watching at the churches and they carried it out anyway (I was a volunteer).

Inside of the churches, all the right-wing ones had literature racks and fund-raisers for people standing in line. They used the elections to proselytize and make money. Church elders (again, only the right-wing ones, the "happy" churches were all cool about it) yelled and screamed and told us we had to leave the property, even after we showed them our credentials. We didn't leave until we were ready to.

It was an educational day.
 
2012-11-26 12:17:51 PM  

serpent_sky: Insatiable Jesus: How about we just give them all the rope they want for now, eh?

Because they have already had more than enough and it's not enough to hang them because they scream persecution the second anyone says anything.

I really would love to see all the churches lose their tax-exempt status, since they're not staying out of politics either way, and the country could use the money. But see above: persecution.


The IRS needs to crack down on those churches which violate the requirements of their status but not all churches do it so a blanket repeal of tax-exempt statuses isn't the answer
 
2012-11-26 12:18:17 PM  
The thing is, every election the population is larger than it was the previous time, and there aren't a ton of new precincts being added as budgets are strained and volunteers are already hard to come by.

Early voting helps reduce the strain on the polling places come Election Day. Yes, it also is a convenience, so people need not miss work or the like. But imagine what those 4+ hour lines would have been like without the millions of people the had already voted.

There are decent arguments for not starting it ridiculously early, but beyond that it should probably be expanded as long as states aren't going to put in the resources (money and people) required to significantly expand the number of voting machines and polling places for use on Election Day.

But above and beyond all that, another good reason to support it is the demeanor and attitude of the people that went out of their way in this election cycle to restrict, reduce, and even eliminate it - the Jon Husteds, the Rick Scotts, and others, sometimes trying to find a way to defy court orders in the process. If they are the people vehemently against it, primarily because all the "wrong people" tend to vote early, you should be for it.
 
2012-11-26 12:18:26 PM  

qorkfiend:

I have no problem with the church's physical facilities being used as a polling place. However, the church should be subject to the same bans on electioneering as anyplace else.


Just a reminder about the huge Obama mural at one school polling place in PA. They didn't cover that up until the court forced them to. So, if the churches need to cover up messages, then all polling places should be devoid of this. Yes?
 
2012-11-26 12:20:31 PM  

k1j2b3: qorkfiend:

I have no problem with the church's physical facilities being used as a polling place. However, the church should be subject to the same bans on electioneering as anyplace else.

Just a reminder about the huge Obama mural at one school polling place in PA. They didn't cover that up until the court forced them to. So, if the churches need to cover up messages, then all polling places should be devoid of this. Yes?


Absolutely they should. The polling place should be nonpartisan.
 
2012-11-26 12:20:38 PM  
I've always felt it a tiny bit unsettling having to vote at a church. Even so, there have never been any issues at my local church/polling place that I've found objectionable. I will say that I liked it better when I voted in a library. As long as there are no shenanigans, it's all good with me.

Also, the church where I vote is usually pretty good at getting people in and out as quickly as possible.
 
2012-11-26 12:21:12 PM  
 
2012-11-26 12:22:13 PM  

someonelse: Jon iz teh kewl: aren't all churches portals to HELL?

Yeah, but make sure you stop by for coffee and sweet rolls in the narthex first.


How many churches have one now? It's all strip mall glass-and-steel these days, isn't it?
 
2012-11-26 12:22:35 PM  
There are sects of believers who will not enter a church. Wouldn't that make this a potential problem of disenfranchisement? And in the Voting Rights Act-South, no less.

// I suspect there may be a reason we haven't heard of a case like this before
 
2012-11-26 12:24:17 PM  
Pulling voting booths out of churches just allows the lie-bruls to further rig elections. Churches are the last beacons of honesty and integrity in this country. Without voting inside churches, the demoncrats can proceed with with voter intimidation at will. No one will be there to stop them.
 
2012-11-26 12:27:07 PM  
Ugh. I wish they'd stop pulling this kind of stunt.

When our city council approved the addition of orientation and gender identity to the employment and housing nondiscrimination act, all the farking churches circulated the petition to overturn the decision, some during service. I'm very bitter about that.
 
2012-11-26 12:27:31 PM  

serial_crusher: Don't really get why anybody would oppose early voting.


You are kidding/trolling, right? The GOP stands to lose big if people can vote early. They have worked pretty hard to suppress early voting, and quite frankly do not likely appreciate your position on the matter. (source)

Hell, they even acknowledge that voter suppression is the goal of early voting restrictions. (source)

Regarding churches, voting should not take place in them for the same reason that voting should not take place in a campaign headquarters. It doesn't matter if the walls are stripped of 'obvious' partisanship: Everyone knows what the building is and what it stands for. Clearly, you have not been to a church in the South.

(As a side note, why shouldn't churches be subject to the same rights and restrictions as any other non-profit, viz: Prove it with tax paperwork, and pay taxes on your land. Why do you want free rides for magic believers?)
 
2012-11-26 12:29:02 PM  
Not if they want to keep their tax exempt status.
 
2012-11-26 12:29:44 PM  

crazyeddie: (As a side note, why shouldn't churches be subject to the same rights and restrictions as any other non-profit, viz: Prove it with tax paperwork, and pay taxes on your land. Why do you want free rides for magic believers?)



The NFL is non-profit. Wrap your head around that one. The truth is our laws on the subject are incredibly lax.
 
2012-11-26 12:31:17 PM  
Well yeah, but remember that time those two black men stood outside a polling place? Remember?
 
2012-11-26 12:31:20 PM  
Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.
 
2012-11-26 12:31:36 PM  

DarnoKonrad: The NFL is non-profit. Wrap your head around that one. The truth is our laws on the subject are incredibly lax.


It makes perfect sense for the NFL to be non-profit. It just sounds ridiculous.
 
2012-11-26 12:32:09 PM  

lilbjorn: Well yeah, but remember that time those two black men stood outside a polling place? Remember?


yeah, that was inappropriate too.
 
2012-11-26 12:33:35 PM  

thurstonxhowell: DarnoKonrad: The NFL is non-profit. Wrap your head around that one. The truth is our laws on the subject are incredibly lax.

It makes perfect sense for the NFL to be non-profit. It just sounds ridiculous.


it is ridiculous.The NFL exists to make money, and they're quite good at it.
 
2012-11-26 12:34:52 PM  

Citrate1007: Not if they want to keep their tax exempt status.


At this point nothing churches do will revoke their exemption status. Nobody has the political balls to rein them in.
 
2012-11-26 12:36:15 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.


I get the same feeling from false equivalences.
 
2012-11-26 12:37:42 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Diogenes: I don't think churches are the best option but I can live with it. Never had a problem when I had to vote at one.

In Oklahoma it's the best option. There is at least one on every street corner and they arnt doing anything during the week. Well maybe Wednesday night.


AA meetings?
 
2012-11-26 12:37:44 PM  
Hey, now how can the churches know that was bad? They are just trying to do something about their massive divorce rate amongst their followers that is many times higher than the rest of the country.
 
2012-11-26 12:38:14 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.


Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?
 
2012-11-26 12:38:38 PM  

k1j2b3: qorkfiend:

I have no problem with the church's physical facilities being used as a polling place. However, the church should be subject to the same bans on electioneering as anyplace else.

Just a reminder about the huge Obama mural at one school polling place in PA. They didn't cover that up until the court forced them to. So, if the churches need to cover up messages, then all polling places should be devoid of this. Yes?


Sure, I'll copy what I said the first time into another comment for you:

the church should be subject to the same bans on electioneering as anyplace else.
 
2012-11-26 12:39:49 PM  

DarnoKonrad: thurstonxhowell: DarnoKonrad: The NFL is non-profit. Wrap your head around that one. The truth is our laws on the subject are incredibly lax.

It makes perfect sense for the NFL to be non-profit. It just sounds ridiculous.

it is ridiculous.The NFL exists to make money, and they're quite good at it.


Maybe it's like a professional association. I used to work for a large Realtor association, and the association itself was considered a non-profit. The members of that association were NOT considered to be non-profit, however. So, I guess that whereas the entity of the NFL doesn't pay taxes, the teams probably do. Seems like that would be the distinction.
 
2012-11-26 12:42:36 PM  

Craptastic: DarnoKonrad: thurstonxhowell: DarnoKonrad: The NFL is non-profit. Wrap your head around that one. The truth is our laws on the subject are incredibly lax.

It makes perfect sense for the NFL to be non-profit. It just sounds ridiculous.

it is ridiculous.The NFL exists to make money, and they're quite good at it.

Maybe it's like a professional association. I used to work for a large Realtor association, and the association itself was considered a non-profit. The members of that association were NOT considered to be non-profit, however. So, I guess that whereas the entity of the NFL doesn't pay taxes, the teams probably do. Seems like that would be the distinction.


NFL is considered a trade organization for these purposes
 
2012-11-26 12:47:09 PM  
Churches should not be within 100 feet of a polling place.
 
2012-11-26 12:49:23 PM  
I voted in an elementary school. The pro-"laminated Garfield posters" agenda was plastered everywhere.

/lame joke
 
2012-11-26 12:50:52 PM  

NO!



next?

/DNRTFA
 
2012-11-26 12:58:38 PM  

HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?


No, you just need an over-active imagination.
 
2012-11-26 01:11:20 PM  

serpent_sky: serial_crusher: I'd greatly prefer it if they kept schools open on election day. Stop short changing our kids out of a day of education just because people were too lazy to go vote during the 2 week long early voting period prior to "election day".

CT has no early voting, so I'm sort of fascinated by the whole early voting thing. It was such a huge deal this year (for the first time I can really remember) and its sort of defeats the purpose of election day, doesn't it? I have always been aware of absentee ballots, but I did not know there were actual polling places open for weeks at a time before election day. I thought you had to have a very good reason (military, college in another state, etc.) to vote anywhere but your designated polling place, on election day.

When I was a kid, they had voting in our school cafeteria. We had lunch in our classrooms and got something special, like pizza from a local place on that day. I suppose it worked out for everyone. We certainly liked the treat.


There are very good reasons for early voting in the south, In years past here in Floriduh for example, the rich parts of the state have lots and lots of voting machines on election day and no lines, but the poorer parts of town have lines out the building and around the block due to only having a few voting machines available. Always so strange to see that happen. This year, I was hearing reports of people still in line hours after the polls closed in Miami-Dade county waiting to cast their ballots due to lack of machines and high voter turnout.
 
2012-11-26 01:12:20 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.


So you didn't RTFA, then?
 
2012-11-26 01:13:47 PM  

Zalan: There are very good reasons for early voting in the south, In years past here in Floriduh for example, the rich parts of the state have lots and lots of voting machines on election day and no lines, but the poorer parts of town have lines out the building and around the block due to only having a few voting machines available. Always so strange to see that happen. This year, I was hearing reports of people still in line hours after the polls closed in Miami-Dade county waiting to cast their ballots due to lack of machines and high voter turnout.


Seems to me that if you had lines for hours and hundreds or thousands of people who were not properly accommodated, that could be fixed the next time around by obtaining more machines/ballots, opening more polling places, moving machines from less frequented areas to more frequented areas. You almost make it sound as if someone (who could it be?) doesn't want low-income or minority voters to have their say... sigh.
 
2012-11-26 01:14:22 PM  
Our Church buddies love sticking their snouts into our Politics/Government, but they sure aren't too keen on paying taxes.
 
2012-11-26 01:14:56 PM  
Just cover it up with some posters.

media.philly.com
 
2012-11-26 01:17:39 PM  

Zalan: There are very good reasons for early voting in the south, In years past here in Floriduh for example, the rich parts of the state have lots and lots of voting machines on election day and no lines, but the poorer parts of town have lines out the building and around the block due to only having a few voting machines available. Always so strange to see that happen. This year, I was hearing reports of people still in line hours after the polls closed in Miami-Dade county waiting to cast their ballots due to lack of machines and high voter turnout.


In MD, by law, polling places must have 5 machines for every 200 voters (maybe that's only MoCo? IIRC it's the whole state). Lines were pretty manageable here. (CSB: I was in-and-out of a fairly busy polling place in 45 minutes, and that's including some time I spent BSing with a friend I ran into there).

In VA, where that number is something like 2 machines for 1,000 voters, and there is actually a LAW LIMITING THE NUMBER OF MACHINES PER POLLING PLACE, there were 5, 6, 7 hour waits to vote. Apparently, VA couldn't be bothered to make sure their elections were non-clusterfarky, so they didn't allow any funding to improve things from 2010 (when things were all clusterfarky). Some people might note the relative party affiliations of the Governor/SecState and their constituencies, but surely our elected officials would not play politics with an election.
 
MFL
2012-11-26 01:19:35 PM  
Self proclaimed "Progressives" have promoted Motor Voter laws and same day registration, and month-long election days to help them mobilize the votes of people who are so unconnected to the political process and so uninterested in the country's future, and perhaps so incompetent to understand what voting entails that they require keepers to see that they get to the polls and then vote the "right" way.....are getting all worked up stupid shiat like this. Remarkable.....

We've got 47 million people (and counting) on food stamps that are going to always vote for you. The next generation has more "education" than any generation before it and they are still remarkably the most useless generation this country has ever produced. This is great news for the DNC.
 
2012-11-26 01:21:18 PM  

MFL: Self proclaimed "Progressives" have promoted Motor Voter laws and same day registration, and month-long election days to help them mobilize the votes of people who are so unconnected to the political process and so uninterested in the country's future, and perhaps so incompetent to understand what voting entails that they require keepers to see that they get to the polls and then vote the "right" way.....are getting all worked up stupid shiat like this. Remarkable.....

We've got 47 million people (and counting) on food stamps that are going to always vote for you. The next generation has more "education" than any generation before it and they are still remarkably the most useless generation this country has ever produced. This is great news for the DNC.


Still more butthurt I see. Please cry some more.
 
2012-11-26 01:22:41 PM  
My problem comes with using schools as polling places. Midland Texas passed the largest school bond (property tax increase) in city history by plastering "Vote for better Schools, Vote for a better Midland" all over our schools as they were being used as polling places.
 
2012-11-26 01:23:32 PM  
The church I voted at here in Minnesota had "Trust God's authority; not man's majority" on it's sign out front. Such BS that these asshats get away with such crap.
 
2012-11-26 01:25:51 PM  

HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?


Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.
 
2012-11-26 01:28:09 PM  

serpent_sky: Zalan: There are very good reasons for early voting in the south, In years past here in Floriduh for example, the rich parts of the state have lots and lots of voting machines on election day and no lines, but the poorer parts of town have lines out the building and around the block due to only having a few voting machines available. Always so strange to see that happen. This year, I was hearing reports of people still in line hours after the polls closed in Miami-Dade county waiting to cast their ballots due to lack of machines and high voter turnout.

Seems to me that if you had lines for hours and hundreds or thousands of people who were not properly accommodated, that could be fixed the next time around by obtaining more machines/ballots, opening more polling places, moving machines from less frequented areas to more frequented areas. You almost make it sound as if someone (who could it be?) doesn't want low-income or minority voters to have their say... sigh.


You would certainly think that...
 
2012-11-26 01:28:43 PM  

MFL: Self proclaimed "Progressives" have promoted Motor Voter laws and same day registration, and month-long election days to help them mobilize the votes of people who are so unconnected to the political process and so uninterested in the country's future, and perhaps so incompetent to understand what voting entails that they require keepers to see that they get to the polls and then vote the "right" way.....are getting all worked up stupid shiat like this. Remarkable.....

We've got 47 million people (and counting) on food stamps that are going to always vote for you. The next generation has more "education" than any generation before it and they are still remarkably the most useless generation this country has ever produced. This is great news for the DNC.


To summarize this post; my side lost so everyone's farking retarded but me. Also, Obama got in his time machine and signed all the Food Stamp legislation in the past and then single-handedly caused the Recession. Also, I'm incredible asspained that demographics are skewing away from the Republican base.
 
2012-11-26 01:29:50 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?

Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.


Ah, so you're just threadjacking. Good to know.
 
2012-11-26 01:31:46 PM  
Separation of church and state. Poll at schools, major businesses, and other "secular" places. It's been proven time and time again that religion can't keep its nose out of politics.
 
2012-11-26 01:32:56 PM  

whistleridge: Unless doing so costs them their tax-exempt status and leads to their immediately having to pony up 30% of their income in direct taxation, plus having to complete an obscene amount of paperwork in triplicate. Then I'm all for it.

/ you act like a political organization, you need to be taxed like a political organization


You can't punish religious people for their right to have an opinion. They have just as much right as you do.
 
2012-11-26 01:35:10 PM  

BronyMedic: So these places willfully commited federal crimes by breaking election laws, and they have admitted to doing such on national media as an "oversight?"

So, why hasn't anyone been charged with election tampering yet for this?

/I think we know the answer...



Well, there is an active lawsuit right now by the Freedom From Religion Foundation on that exact subject. Basically, they're suing the feds for dicriminatory application of the law. In essence, the FFRF has to abide by the IRS' laws regarding electioneering so they're suing because the IRS doesn't seem interested in applying those laws to christians.

It'll be interesting to see how that's resolved. So many evangelical churches have been openly and intentionally violating the rules (seriously, many even participated in a day that was explicitly described as an attempt to flout the law) that I think the IRS should have a hard time explaining their lack of enforcement.


MFL: Self proclaimed "Progressives" have promoted Motor Voter laws and same day registration, and month-long election days to help them mobilize the votes of people who are so unconnected to the political process and so uninterested in the country's future, and perhaps so incompetent to understand what voting entails that they require keepers to see that they get to the polls and then vote the "right" way.....are getting all worked up stupid shiat like this. Remarkable.....

We've got 47 million people (and counting) on food stamps that are going to always vote for you. The next generation has more "education" than any generation before it and they are still remarkably the most useless generation this country has ever produced. This is great news for the DNC.



I find your frustration hilarious and heartening.
 
2012-11-26 01:38:48 PM  

Mija: whistleridge: Unless doing so costs them their tax-exempt status and leads to their immediately having to pony up 30% of their income in direct taxation, plus having to complete an obscene amount of paperwork in triplicate. Then I'm all for it.

/ you act like a political organization, you need to be taxed like a political organization

You can't punish religious people for their right to have an opinion. They have just as much right as you do.


Nobody is suggesting that religious people be punished for having an opinion. Religious organizations, however, are not entitled to have a religious opinion if they also enjoy tax free status.

If they cannot confine themselves to their particular superstition, they are not entitled to that status and should pay taxes on whatever they collect from their marks.

Likewise, said marks should not be able to deduct whatever dues they pay from their taxes.
 
2012-11-26 01:39:35 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.


Sometimes, people who are you remind me of jackasses who don't understand the point of a comment section.
 
2012-11-26 01:40:42 PM  

jcooli09: ...Religious organizations, however, are not entitled to have a religious political opinion if they also enjoy tax free status.

...


Oops!
 
2012-11-26 01:41:55 PM  

crazyeddie: You are kidding/trolling, right? The GOP stands to lose big if people can vote early. They have worked pretty hard to suppress early voting, and quite frankly do not likely appreciate your position on the matter.


Understood but "I don't like early voting because people will vote against me" is anti-democracy. Why hold the election at all?

If turnout is 100% and I lose, either I won't make a good representative or I promoted my candidacy poorly. The OP's point stands: what kind of anti-American nutjob would stifle democracy? They need to take the country back from the people? That's farked up. It shows a fundamental misunderstanding of the basic rules of our society.
 
2012-11-26 01:44:30 PM  

mongbiohazard: Well, there is an active lawsuit right now by the Freedom From Religion Foundation on that exact subject. Basically, they're suing the feds for dicriminatory application of the law. In essence, the FFRF has to abide by the IRS' laws regarding electioneering so they're suing because the IRS doesn't seem interested in applying those laws to christians religious groups/entities.


It's not like synagogues and mosques (and temples and meeting places and forests and...) are being taxed up the wazoo. It's most noticeable with the religion that 80% of US believers subscribe to, but it's endemic to the IRS' application of tax law to religious establishments.
 
2012-11-26 01:44:39 PM  

Keizer_Ghidorah: Separation of church and state. Poll at schools, major businesses, and other "secular" places. It's been proven time and time again that religion can't keep its nose out of politics.


But schools and businesses can? Heck, common ballot initiatives directly involve schools.
 
2012-11-26 01:45:16 PM  

jcooli09: Nobody is suggesting that religious people be punished for having an opinion. Religious organizations, however, are not entitled to have a religious opinion if they also enjoy tax free status.


they are allowed to have a political opinion. The Catholic Church, for example, can oppose abortion and capital punishment and still retain its tax exempt status.
 
2012-11-26 01:45:37 PM  
Most of the places I've voted at were churches, but I've never seen any of the issues that seem to happen elsewhere. It's usually just booths set up in the fellowship hall or gymnasium and it might as well be a school gym--nothing visibly religious. The church I grew up in has always been a polling place and they use the sanctuary, but we were the sort of Presbyterians who don't believe in religious imagery of any kind, so there isn't even a cross on the wall. They'd just stack up the chairs along the walls and stick booths in.

I have a problem though, with voting in churches when there's religious iconography staring down at you while you're in the booth. Particularly with gay rights votes, where all the anti-gay rhetoric is religiously charged, that strikes me as electioneering. To have Mary and Joseph and the Baby Jesus staring down on you disapprovingly when you cast a vote for equality doesn't seem right.
 
2012-11-26 01:47:51 PM  
So allowing more people to be in happy stable legally recognized contractual states of existence is bad? HRM. Yeah I don't think the whole marriage is only for straights crowd has REALLY thought this through. Their argument comes mostly from a place of insecurity and a feeling that the popular culture is against them so they fight the inevitable with cries of marriage being sacred and such when in reality marriage is the domain of the state and has been since...since Henry VIII kicked out the catholic church.

Nevada alone proves that marriage is just a legal contract to co-habitat and/or procreate and contribute to society at a larger level than simply being a selfish individual. I for one say that any candidate for office that does not promote MORE freedom ought not to be voted for at all ever. People ought to be free to marry/not to marry rather than free from marriage by others ...amirite? Just as you ought to be free to worship/or not to worship rather than being free from others worshipping.

Social conservatives claim to want to stabilize society with the institution of marriage. Well what better way than to encourage those who have been outcasts to "come into the fold" via marriage. They want to be more like YOU...this is hardly a bad thing to extend the same legal protections and tax status to more people simply because of their sexual orientation.
 
2012-11-26 01:52:25 PM  

HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?

Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.

Ah, so you're just threadjacking. Good to know.


Keep proving my point.
 
2012-11-26 01:56:13 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?

Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.

Ah, so you're just threadjacking. Good to know.

Keep proving my point.


Perhaps you'd like to explain what your point is. Slowly. Like I'm an idiot. Because the only "point" I'm getting out of your posts is that you don't think that churches engage in electioneering when they host polling places, despite the fact that TFA cites several confirmed instances of them doing just that.
 
2012-11-26 01:57:56 PM  

HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?

Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.

Ah, so you're just threadjacking. Good to know.

Keep proving my point.

Perhaps you'd like to explain what your point is. Slowly. Like I'm an idiot. Because the only "point" I'm getting out of your posts is that you don't think that churches engage in electioneering when they host polling places, despite the fact that TFA cites several confirmed instances of them doing just that.


they clearly do - read the thread though. There are several instances where the mere fact that the polling place is a church bothers people. That's silly.
 
2012-11-26 01:59:08 PM  

skullkrusher: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?

Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.

Ah, so you're just threadjacking. Good to know.

Keep proving my point.

Perhaps you'd like to explain what your point is. Slowly. Like I'm an idiot. Because the only "point" I'm getting out of your posts is that you don't think that churches engage in electioneering when they host polling places, despite the fact that TFA cites several confirmed instances of them doing just that.

they clearly do - read the thread though. There are several instances where the mere fact that the polling place is a church bothers people. That's silly.


I agree, that is silly. That's not what was claimed by BarkingUnicorn, however.
 
2012-11-26 02:01:22 PM  

whistleridge: Unless doing so costs them their tax-exempt status and leads to their immediately having to pony up 30% of their income in direct taxation, plus having to complete an obscene amount of paperwork in triplicate. Then I'm all for it.

/ you act like a political organization, you need to be taxed like a political organization


What income?
 
2012-11-26 02:01:38 PM  

HeartBurnKid: skullkrusher: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?

Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.

Ah, so you're just threadjacking. Good to know.

Keep proving my point.

Perhaps you'd like to explain what your point is. Slowly. Like I'm an idiot. Because the only "point" I'm getting out of your posts is that you don't think that churches engage in electioneering when they host polling places, despite the fact that TFA cites several confirmed instances of them doing just that.

they clearly do - read the thread though. There are several instances where the mere fact that the polling place is a church bothers people. That's silly.

I agree, that is silly. That's not what was claimed by BarkingUnicorn, however.


Account created: 2012-03-04 23:18:14
 
2012-11-26 02:01:51 PM  

whistleridge: Unless doing so costs them their tax-exempt status and leads to their immediately having to pony up 30% of their income in direct taxation, plus having to complete an obscene amount of paperwork in triplicate. Then I'm all for it.

/ you act like a political organization, you need to be taxed like a political organization


Political organizations are also typically forbidden from advertising or advocating political positions within a certain distance of a polling place by electioneering law. I know in Texas it's 100 feet or so, and you can actually got to jail over it if you push it hard enough. No idea what the restriction is in any of the states with Gay Marriage referenda, but I'm betting there's at least a high-class misdemeanor in this.
 
2012-11-26 02:07:01 PM  
I'd have a bigger problem with this if the Christian church wasn't #1 in redefining marriage in the world, which in turn led to ever-increasing and historically-high rates of marriage dissolution. In light of that, signs like that aren't so much political statements as tacit admissions that church people are, in fact, complete assholes.

Churches still need to have tax exempt status universally revoked, though.
 
2012-11-26 02:09:16 PM  

wxboy: Do churches (and everywhere else) get paid for being a voting precinct?


Not where I live. It's just a public service, which is why your choices are limited to public buildings and churches.

\My new polling place was actually in a private school because there's no public buildings or even churches in the precinct. Both their facilities staff and the faculty whose building we were taking up were incredibly accommodating, and I suppose the kids got to see that the school values voting.
 
2012-11-26 02:10:42 PM  
I'm an agnostic and nonreligious. My polling place this year was a church.

I didn't note any overt or specific political messaging. There were crosses and few pieces of religious iconography on the wall, by they didn't bother me any more than the community activities bulletin board at the Senior Center that was my polling place in my old district. Which had roughly about the same amount of relevance and meaning to me personally.

Anyway, it's just a room with ballots and a voting machine in it. I don't much care where it is, as long as the poll workers are competent and the machines are working well.
 
2012-11-26 02:15:40 PM  

Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.


i guess you don't have a problem wtih this

http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/obama-mural-philadelphia-polling- p lace_661833.html
 
2012-11-26 02:19:19 PM  

Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.


With the size of some of the churches we have around here, it's possible the banner could have been 100 feet above the entrance of the polling location.
 
2012-11-26 02:20:31 PM  
Vote by mail biatches. No more polling place nonsense to deal with.
 
2012-11-26 02:21:43 PM  

The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Diogenes: I don't think churches are the best option but I can live with it. Never had a problem when I had to vote at one.

In Oklahoma it's the best option. There is at least one on every street corner and they arnt doing anything during the week. Well maybe Wednesday night.

AA meetings?


Some protestant churches have become fond of midweek services.

\In my denomination it just seems to be the default choir rehearsal evening.
 
2012-11-26 02:26:00 PM  
because so many people are swayed to change their opinion on hot topic issues at the last minute thanks to a half-assedly slapped together message on a sign near the polling place.

let's be real here, people. there are plenty of reasons to think Churches are fronts for fraud and ridiculousness. This isn't really one of em.
 
2012-11-26 02:28:08 PM  
FTA: Reverend Patrick J. Driscoll, associate pastor defended the display in an email to TAI: "So that you know, that sign is up all year long. Life is precious and God's gift."

Unless you made fun of an old bald guy, and God sends bears to kill you...
...or you were one of the tend of thousands of people that lived in and around Sodom and Gemmorah
...or you were the first-born to any family in Egypt
...or you were anybody on the freaking planet who wasn't lucky enough to be related to Noah.

Based on the book, God's main gift is death.
 
2012-11-26 02:29:51 PM  
My polling place has been a middle school, built in the midst of heavy soccer mom turf so the parking is designed for lots of flow through and brief stops.

Most churches here (Dallas area) have either conventional parking lots or worse, haphazardly arranged parking.

With that in mind, maybe we should look into drive thru voting. Or Sonic style where a few dozen parking spaces are set up to vote. It's just a matter of having officials go from car to car to check ID's.
 
2012-11-26 02:29:58 PM  

Dr Dreidel: There are sects of believers who will not enter a church. Wouldn't that make this a potential problem of disenfranchisement? And in the Voting Rights Act-South, no less.


Do the votes of people who think that way really matter?
 
2012-11-26 02:32:46 PM  

Mija: You can't punish religious people for their right to have an opinion. They have just as much right as you do.


I agree. However, when a church applies for tax exempt status they agree to abide by certain rules. If they later choose to break those rules, they should lose their tax exempt status. If they don't like the rules they shouldn't agree to abide by them.
 
2012-11-26 02:33:45 PM  

havocmike: Dr Dreidel: There are sects of believers who will not enter a church. Wouldn't that make this a potential problem of disenfranchisement? And in the Voting Rights Act-South, no less.

Do the votes of people who think that way really matter?


We need not modify our legal codes to take every superstition into account.
 
2012-11-26 02:41:46 PM  

Lando Lincoln: Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places.

Like the stupid banners are going to change someone's minds right at the last minute?


Uh, that's not really the point.
 
2012-11-26 02:43:34 PM  

havocmike: Dr Dreidel: There are sects of believers who will not enter a church. Wouldn't that make this a potential problem of disenfranchisement? And in the Voting Rights Act-South, no less.

Do the votes of people who think that way really matter?


Yes, if they're citizens. They let crazy racists vote, too, right?

Leeds: We need not modify our legal codes to take every superstition into account.


But we should take care that our chosen lowest-common-denominator is not still disenfranchising people. We don't have to "account" for a "superstition" by saying that polling places are not places of worship and vice-versa. No one gets any special favors, and no one has to lose out.
 
2012-11-26 02:58:25 PM  
Only catholic churches should be used as polling places, because the fundies are scared to go in for fear of being molested by papists :p

Wasn't there a tempest-in-a-teacup over an inner city school that had a mural of President Obama in the polling area?
 
2012-11-26 03:22:23 PM  
"If a man lies with a man as one lies with a woman, both of them have done what is detestable. They must be put to death; their blood will be on their own heads"

Seems pretty clear to me. If you believe in the bible then you must believe in death to people who commit homosexual acts while lying down. It's OK to fish for brown trout doggy style or while standing up, but you really don't want to lie down and take it missionary because well-meaning people might need to kill you if you do that.

The other parts of Leviticus are to be taken as being just as relevant:

And the swine, because he parteth the hoof, and is clovenfooted, but cheweth not the cud, he is unclean unto you.

If a man goes to bed with her, and her menstrual flow touches him, he will be unclean seven days; and every bed he lies on will be unclean.

Of all the creatures living in the water of the seas and the streams you may eat any that have fins and scales. 10 But all creatures in the seas or streams that do not have fins and scales-whether among all the swarming things or among all the other living creatures in the water-you are to regard as unclean. 11 And since you are to regard them as unclean, you must not eat their meat; you must regard their carcasses as unclean.

However, of those that chew the cud or that have a divided hoof you may not eat the camel, the rabbit or the hyrax. Although they chew the cud, they do not have a divided hoof; they are ceremonially unclean for you.


You sick Hyrax eating mother farkers make me wanna puke. Die and go to hell immediately if not sooner.
 
2012-11-26 03:28:15 PM  

kid_icarus: Pretty much this. In a rural area, you pretty much have to pick between a church or the local elementary school.


And the local elementary schools tend to be in use on Tuesdays.
Of course, you can close the schools, but then you have the kids out of school, meaning parents have to take care of them, adding to the hassles for the parent voting.

serial_crusher: I'd greatly prefer it if they kept schools open on election day. Stop short changing our kids out of a day of education just because people were too lazy to go vote during the 2 week long early voting period prior to "election day".


The local school system rigs the school calendar to have one of the "teacher work days" (which they periodically have anyway) fall on election day.

stevenrushing: My problem comes with using schools as polling places. Midland Texas passed the largest school bond (property tax increase) in city history by plastering "Vote for better Schools, Vote for a better Midland" all over our schools as they were being used as polling places.


Yeah, that's also pretty sketchy.
 
2012-11-26 03:28:56 PM  

Big_Fat_Liar: "If a man lies with a man as one lies with a woman, both of them have done what is detestable. They must be put to death; their blood will be on their own heads"

Seems pretty clear to me. If you believe in the bible then you must believe in death to people who commit homosexual acts while lying down. It's OK to fish for brown trout doggy style or while standing up, but you really don't want to lie down and take it missionary because well-meaning people might need to kill you if you do that.

The other parts of Leviticus are to be taken as being just as relevant:

And the swine, because he parteth the hoof, and is clovenfooted, but cheweth not the cud, he is unclean unto you.

If a man goes to bed with her, and her menstrual flow touches him, he will be unclean seven days; and every bed he lies on will be unclean.

Of all the creatures living in the water of the seas and the streams you may eat any that have fins and scales. 10 But all creatures in the seas or streams that do not have fins and scales-whether among all the swarming things or among all the other living creatures in the water-you are to regard as unclean. 11 And since you are to regard them as unclean, you must not eat their meat; you must regard their carcasses as unclean.

However, of those that chew the cud or that have a divided hoof you may not eat the camel, the rabbit or the hyrax. Although they chew the cud, they do not have a divided hoof; they are ceremonially unclean for you.

You sick Hyrax eating mother farkers make me wanna puke. Die and go to hell immediately if not sooner.


aha! Even the ancient Hebrews found those insipid Oreo knockoffs to be hateful unto the Lord's eyes
 
2012-11-26 03:29:43 PM  

skullkrusher: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?

Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.

Ah, so you're just threadjacking. Good to know.

Keep proving my point.

Perhaps you'd like to explain what your point is. Slowly. Like I'm an idiot. Because the only "point" I'm getting out of your posts is that you don't think that churches engage in electioneering when they host polling places, despite the fact that TFA cites several confirmed instances of them doing just that.

they clearly do - read the thread though. There are several instances where the mere fact that the polling place is a church bothers people. That's silly.


If a mosque was your designated polling place, how would you feel about that? How would the average Christian feel?
 
2012-11-26 03:31:21 PM  

Egalitarian: skullkrusher: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?

Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.

Ah, so you're just threadjacking. Good to know.

Keep proving my point.

Perhaps you'd like to explain what your point is. Slowly. Like I'm an idiot. Because the only "point" I'm getting out of your posts is that you don't think that churches engage in electioneering when they host polling places, despite the fact that TFA cites several confirmed instances of them doing just that.

they clearly do - read the thread though. There are several instances where the mere fact that the polling place is a church bothers people. That's silly.

If a mosque was your designated polling place, how would you feel about that? How would the average Christian feel?


I wouldn't care in the slightest - just as I don't care that I have to go to a godless den of socialist indoctrination currently
 
2012-11-26 03:47:07 PM  
I wouldn't care in the slightest - just as I don't care that I have to go to a godless den of socialist indoctrination currently

I assume you're trolling, since I've never heard of public school indoctrinating kids to be atheists. They just don't talk about religion, or at least they're not supposed to. Except for the Pledge of Allegiance, where I was forced to mouth "Under God" every day in junior high. That was very uncomfortable for a kid who didn't want to lie, but didn't want to get picked on for being different either.

And I presume you never went to school in the South or know anybody who has, because some Southern teachers let religious comments slip in with other inane junk. My World History teacher sang the praises of Jesus in between comments on the ancient Pyramids and their amazing measurements that matched this or that astronomical measurement times a random number.

Another teacher, I think she was Social Studies, was talking about forms of abuse and added that spiritual abuse was another form. "If you don't take your kids to church, you're abusing them." Soooo full of shiat. Hey my atheist parents didn't take me to church but at least they didn't abuse me. Which is more than you can say for a lot of church-going families, where sexual abuse and drunken beatings are rampant.
 
2012-11-26 03:50:46 PM  

HeartBurnKid: skullkrusher: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?

Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.

Ah, so you're just threadjacking. Good to know.

Keep proving my point.

Perhaps you'd like to explain what your point is. Slowly. Like I'm an idiot. Because the only "point" I'm getting out of your posts is that you don't think that churches engage in electioneering when they host polling places, despite the fact that TFA cites several confirmed instances of them doing just that.

they clearly do - read the thread though. There are several instances where the mere fact that the polling place is a church bothers people. That's silly.

I agree, that is silly. That's not what was claimed by BarkingUnicorn, however.


Right. I claimed that sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi. Then your over-active imagination took over, and here we are.
 
2012-11-26 03:55:19 PM  

Egalitarian: I assume you're trolling joking, since I've never heard of public school indoctrinating kids to be atheists.


there ya go

Egalitarian: And I presume you never went to school in the South or know anybody who has, because some Southern teachers let religious comments slip in with other inane junk. My World History teacher sang the praises of Jesus in between comments on the ancient Pyramids and their amazing measurements that matched this or that astronomical measurement times a random number.

Another teacher, I think she was Social Studies, was talking about forms of abuse and added that spiritual abuse was another form. "If you don't take your kids to church, you're abusing them." Soooo full of shiat. Hey my atheist parents didn't take me to church but at least they didn't abuse me. Which is more than you can say for a lot of church-going families, where sexual abuse and drunken beatings are rampant.


this has nothing to do with whether it's ok to use a church building as a polling place
 
2012-11-26 04:09:52 PM  
Why not? In PA they held a polling place where a huge mural of Obama was. HYPOCRITE much, Dems??????
 
2012-11-26 04:19:44 PM  

Egalitarian: If a mosque was your designated polling place, how would you feel about that? How would the average Christian feel?


I would imagine that for the average Christian it would provide their first glimpse into what's inside of a mosque. Sort of like a middle schooler seeing the inside of a women's room during remodeling.

It might be a step in the right direction to demystify each others' superstitions.
 
2012-11-26 04:20:38 PM  

Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.


I don't like it either, and never have. But then, I strongly dislike having to enter a church for any reason. I almost never go to weddings for that reason, unless they're held in someone's back yard or on the beach.

My local precinct is an elementary school. Before I moved to this house a few years ago, I voted at a fire station, ten feet from the big yellow pumper. Somehow, there's something intrinsically "American" about that. Almost Norman Rockwell-ish.
 
2012-11-26 04:26:40 PM  

mksmith: Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.

I don't like it either, and never have. But then, I strongly dislike having to enter a church for any reason. I almost never go to weddings for that reason, unless they're held in someone's back yard or on the beach.


You don't like it, but you don't shy away from voting just because of the surroundings, right?
 
2012-11-26 04:28:21 PM  
serial_crusher Don't really get why anybody would oppose early voting.

Republicans.

And you and I both know why they oppose it.
 
2012-11-26 04:31:06 PM  

serial_crusher: Don't really get why anybody would oppose early voting.


I'm in favor of it, too, for entirely practical reasons, . . . but there's something about joining the crowd (hopefully) at the poll for an event of national importance. Regardless of who they're voting for, most of the people at my precinct smile and nod at each other while they're standing in line. It's like they're all thinking, "We're all here to be Americans today!"

Yeah, I know, sounds sappy, but I'm perfectly serious. You should be proud to turn out with your fellow citizens to exercise your citizenship together. Voting by mail (or, eventually, online) certainly gets the job done -- but it's just not the same.
 
2012-11-26 04:33:41 PM  
If you're not "Open and Affirming" you're not a church, you're a collection of bigots.

You wouldn't allow Christ into your churches.

Pay taxes, shut down, go to Iran, drop dead; I don't care. Just stop pretending to be holy.
 
2012-11-26 04:53:05 PM  

skullkrusher: If a mosque was your designated polling place, how would you feel about that? How would the average Christian feel?

I wouldn't care in the slightest - just as I don't care that I have to go to a godless den of socialist indoctrination currently


You might not care but setting up a polling place at a mosque but it would go over about as a well as a shart in church for many right wingers. Look at the right wing New Yorkers flipping shiat over just building a mosque.
 
2012-11-26 04:53:58 PM  

Headso: skullkrusher: If a mosque was your designated polling place, how would you feel about that? How would the average Christian feel?

I wouldn't care in the slightest - just as I don't care that I have to go to a godless den of socialist indoctrination currently

You might not care but setting up a polling place at a mosque but it would go over about as a well as a shart in church for many right wingers. Look at the right wing New Yorkers flipping shiat over just building a mosque.


so we shouldn't have polling places in churches because right wingers might be upset about going to a mosque?
You sound terribly concerned
 
2012-11-26 04:58:48 PM  

tony41454: Why not? In PA they held a polling place where a huge mural of Obama was. HYPOCRITE much, Dems??????


Only Republicans equate Obama with God. Why do you people worship false idols?
 
2012-11-26 05:02:43 PM  

skullkrusher: Headso: skullkrusher: If a mosque was your designated polling place, how would you feel about that? How would the average Christian feel?

I wouldn't care in the slightest - just as I don't care that I have to go to a godless den of socialist indoctrination currently

You might not care but setting up a polling place at a mosque but it would go over about as a well as a shart in church for many right wingers. Look at the right wing New Yorkers flipping shiat over just building a mosque.

so we shouldn't have polling places in churches because right wingers might be upset about going to a mosque?
You sound terribly concerned


I think we should only have polling places in mosques, churches of scientology and ethiopian zionist coptic churches.

If that can't happen I don't really give a shiat where they have polling places just so long as they are easy to get to and can handle the people going to them.
 
2012-11-26 05:04:42 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: skullkrusher: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: BarkingUnicorn: Sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi.

Because you have to be a "hyper-sensitive atheist" to have a problem with reactionary assholes electioneering at a polling place in the name of God, right?

No, you just need an over-active imagination.

So you didn't RTFA, then?

Yes, I did. My observation is not based solely upon this article, or upon the subject of electioneering.

Ah, so you're just threadjacking. Good to know.

Keep proving my point.

Perhaps you'd like to explain what your point is. Slowly. Like I'm an idiot. Because the only "point" I'm getting out of your posts is that you don't think that churches engage in electioneering when they host polling places, despite the fact that TFA cites several confirmed instances of them doing just that.

they clearly do - read the thread though. There are several instances where the mere fact that the polling place is a church bothers people. That's silly.

I agree, that is silly. That's not what was claimed by BarkingUnicorn, however.

Right. I claimed that sometimes, hyper-sensitive atheists remind me of people who are allergic to WiFi. Then your over-active imagination took over, and here we are.


My "over-active imagination" that I need to have an issue with the very situation described in TFA, you mean. Because, even though there's several recorded instances of it, apparently it never happens and I'm just hyper-sensitive and on-par with the "wifi allergy" nutjobs.
 
2012-11-26 05:16:08 PM  

Keizer_Ghidorah: tony41454: Why not? In PA they held a polling place where a huge mural of Obama was. HYPOCRITE much, Dems??????

Only Republicans equate Obama with God. Why do you people worship false idols?


No we don't. Obama most certainly exists.
 
2012-11-26 05:39:46 PM  

Headso: skullkrusher: If a mosque was your designated polling place, how would you feel about that? How would the average Christian feel?

I wouldn't care in the slightest - just as I don't care that I have to go to a godless den of socialist indoctrination currently

You might not care but setting up a polling place at a mosque but it would go over about as a well as a shart in church for many right wingers. Look at the right wing New Yorkers flipping shiat over just building a mosque.


By and large, it wasn't New Yorkers flipping out over the Burlington Coat Factory Mosque.

It was assholes from other parts of the country.
 
2012-11-26 05:43:01 PM  

Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.


I'm not religious, I'm fairly hostile to 'organized religion' as a personal matter. Despite this, as long as they follow certain rules I have no problems with using them as polling places. It can be hard finding local areas that are suited for the purpose, and churches can fill the role very well in that they're normally fairly big and open buildings that can handle quite a few people, yet are mostly empty on polling days.

You just need some rules about the political messages.

abb3w: But yeah. Not a fan. (Hereabouts, most polling places are at local schools.)


Where I grew up, you had a public elementary school, a private catholic elementary, and a church within about 2 blocks. All three were used as polling places. And unlike churches, schools are normally in use on election day.

Dr Dreidel: There are sects of believers who will not enter a church. Wouldn't that make this a potential problem of disenfranchisement? And in the Voting Rights Act-South, no less.


Hmmm... Depends on how nutso they are about it, I guess. Most polling in churches doesn't actually take place in the nave, but more in the front hallway or some such, a meeting hall, convention area, etc... If even that is too much for them, they can vote absentee.

Personally, I'd like to see some voting districts locating themselves in Mosques, Synagogues, and such. Just to be fair. Again, such activities should NOT be in their equivalent of the nave/prayer hall.
 
2012-11-26 05:48:47 PM  

HeartBurnKid: My "over-active imagination" that I need to have an issue with the very situation described in TFA, you mean. Because, even though there's several recorded instances of it, apparently it never happens and I'm just hyper-sensitive and on-par with the "wifi allergy" nutjobs.


WiFi allergy does happen in a very few cases. Electioneering law violations at churches happen in a very few cases. But only hypersensitive nutjobs with over-active imaginations inflate these few cases into a nationwide epidemic that threatens to kill everyone or destroy democracy.
 
2012-11-26 05:54:14 PM  

Leeds: Keizer_Ghidorah: tony41454: Why not? In PA they held a polling place where a huge mural of Obama was. HYPOCRITE much, Dems??????

Only Republicans equate Obama with God. Why do you people worship false idols?

No we don't. Obama most certainly exists.


That is one huge advantage Obama has over God, yes.
 
2012-11-26 05:59:10 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Headso: skullkrusher: If a mosque was your designated polling place, how would you feel about that? How would the average Christian feel?

I wouldn't care in the slightest - just as I don't care that I have to go to a godless den of socialist indoctrination currently

You might not care but setting up a polling place at a mosque but it would go over about as a well as a shart in church for many right wingers. Look at the right wing New Yorkers flipping shiat over just building a mosque.

By and large, it wasn't New Yorkers flipping out over the Burlington Coat Factory Mosque.

It was assholes from other parts of the country.


it was started by New Yorkers. The country heard about it because the Kansans and Kentuckians heard about it and got involved
 
2012-11-26 06:06:10 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: HeartBurnKid: My "over-active imagination" that I need to have an issue with the very situation described in TFA, you mean. Because, even though there's several recorded instances of it, apparently it never happens and I'm just hyper-sensitive and on-par with the "wifi allergy" nutjobs.

WiFi allergy does happen in a very few cases. Electioneering law violations at churches happen in a very few cases. But only hypersensitive nutjobs with over-active imaginations inflate these few cases into a nationwide epidemic that threatens to kill everyone or destroy democracy.



There are exactly zero confirmed cases of Wifi allergies. Zero. Not a few, none.

As far as churches electioneering, however, that's all too real. There was an entire day that a whole bunch of christian ministers set aside for all of them to specifically taunt the IRS by electioneering and daring the IRS to go after them. Here's it happening in 2008, here it is in 2010, and again in 2012. So not only is electioneering by churches real, they actually have an organized effort to purposefully engage in it - illegally - each time there's an election.
 
2012-11-26 07:22:55 PM  
This is a problem with specific churches. I have voted at a church since I started and never had a problem like this. That having been said, I also live in a very liberal area and the churches are liberal too so they aren't inclined to do things like this. If a church does put up banners like that during voting they should be prohibited from hosting a polling station again. 

/Funniest thing I saw heading up to the election was that as you drive through my neighborhood you saw a smattering of Obama signs. It wasn't every house, or even every other house; just a few here and there but they were all Obama signs... except for this one house that had like 20 Romney/Ryan signs in neat rows covering the whole the front yard. It was like they were personally trying to make up the sign deficit all by themselves.
 
2012-11-26 07:42:05 PM  

Oniamien: /Funniest thing I saw heading up to the election was that as you drive through my neighborhood you saw a smattering of Obama signs. It wasn't every house, or even every other house; just a few here and there but they were all Obama signs... except for this one house that had like 20 Romney/Ryan signs in neat rows covering the whole the front yard. It was like they were personally trying to make up the sign deficit all by themselves.


Or that family replaced all the Romney signs with Obama signs and put the stolen signs on their lawn to divert suspicion.

/either way, it's funny.
 
2012-11-26 08:57:29 PM  
I don't have an issue with voting in churches since I know zombie Jesus and such aren't going to change my mind on election day.

/Used to vote in a church in Athens, OH
//Voting location was changed to a hunting club!
///Still bought cookies from the old ladies outside after voting.
 
2012-11-26 10:33:03 PM  
Recently my polling place was some dude's garage in a own of 75,000 people with a church, a fire station, and a local university less than a mile away.

I actually had to call to ask because, "Bernard Garage" just doesn't really sound like a legit polling place. It was literally a house in my neighborhood, and they set up polling stations in the guy's garage.
 
2012-11-27 12:05:03 AM  

RogermcAllen: Recently my polling place was some dude's garage in a own of 75,000 people with a church, a fire station, and a local university less than a mile away.

I actually had to call to ask because, "Bernard Garage" just doesn't really sound like a legit polling place. It was literally a house in my neighborhood, and they set up polling stations in the guy's garage.


Guess no one else wanted the hassle, which is a sad state of affairs.
 
2012-11-27 07:07:08 AM  

Leeds: mksmith: Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.

I don't like it either, and never have. But then, I strongly dislike having to enter a church for any reason. I almost never go to weddings for that reason, unless they're held in someone's back yard or on the beach.

You don't like it, but you don't shy away from voting just because of the surroundings, right?


Nope, I don't shy away. I just grit my teeth, sort of. But I've voted in every single national and state election since I turned 21, which was in 1965. (I confess to having passed on a few run-offs for municipal judges, though. . . .)
 
2012-11-27 08:27:36 AM  

Lando Lincoln: Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places.

Like the stupid banners are going to change someone's minds right at the last minute?


Banners do change the minds of some last minute voters. I've spoken to several people who have admitted to me that they changed their vote in the last minute while walking up to the polling place because they saw a 'nice campaign sign' for a particular candidate or cause.

But I'm more concerned with a separation of church and state.

clane: Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.

i guess you don't have a problem wtih this

http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/obama-mural-philadelphia-polling- p lace_661833.html


So since you figured out that I'm a Democrat you assumed I wouldn't have a problem with this? I'm not going to bother answering you since you make such rude assumptions.

Firethorn: I'm not religious, I'm fairly hostile to 'organized religion' as a personal matter. Despite this, as long as they follow certain rules I have no problems with using them as polling places. It can be hard finding local areas that are suited for the purpose, and churches can fill the role very well in that they're normally fairly big and open buildings that can handle quite a few people, yet are mostly empty on polling days.


I have issues with churches and other religiously affiliated sites being used as polling places, but I'm not going to raise a stink about it. I just wish other options were available. It doesn't look like there are any other options, though. Churches as polling places are convenient. They're everywhere, and they can accommodate large numbers of people.

But yeah, I think they should follow a few rules during polling days, which this church doesn't seem to be following.
 
2012-11-27 09:25:32 AM  

mksmith: Leeds: mksmith: Cythraul: I guess I'm one of the few who has a problem with Churches being used as polling places. But it's done all over the place in the South East, and no one else seems to have a problem with it.

I don't like it either, and never have. But then, I strongly dislike having to enter a church for any reason. I almost never go to weddings for that reason, unless they're held in someone's back yard or on the beach.

You don't like it, but you don't shy away from voting just because of the surroundings, right?

Nope, I don't shy away. I just grit my teeth, sort of. But I've voted in every single national and state election since I turned 21, which was in 1965. (I confess to having passed on a few run-offs for municipal judges, though. . . .)


So you are a self-proclaimed example of someone who is uncomfortable in places of worship. And yet you never miss an election regardless of the location of the polling place.

It would seem that the question that started this thread has been absolutely and completely answered. Thank you.
 
Displayed 152 of 152 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report