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(TG Daily)   The US Army wants to develop electromagnetic pulse hand grenades. What could possibly go wrong?   (tgdaily.com) divider line 94
    More: Obvious, electromagnetic pulses, US Army, EMP, homemade bomb, RPGs  
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3635 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Nov 2012 at 10:39 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-25 04:22:38 PM
Setting off all sorts of bombs, including your own, electrocution, frying all electronics in the field of effect, including ones you don't want fried like civilian infrastructure, cars telephones, insulin pumps and pacemakers.
 
2012-11-25 04:29:28 PM
Yeah, sure, but once Skynet sics the terminators on us, EMP grenades will be damned useful.
 
2012-11-25 04:47:46 PM
When was the last time the US went to war with a tech enabled for?
 
2012-11-25 04:49:53 PM
Foe, not for.
 
2012-11-25 04:50:41 PM
www.gamesprays.com
 
2012-11-25 05:44:53 PM

gaslight: Setting off all sorts of bombs, including your own, electrocution, frying all electronics in the field of effect, including ones you don't want fried like civilian infrastructure, cars telephones, insulin pumps and pacemakers.


You forgot creating mutants. Mutants with horrifying and unknown powers.
 
2012-11-25 05:56:13 PM
Welcome back to the Cold War folks.
 
2012-11-25 08:39:44 PM
I'm sure they will come in handy for taking out sentry bots in abandoned underground military facilities in both the DC area and the Mojave desert, some 200 years after the nuclear war with the Chinese.
 
2012-11-25 08:44:22 PM
www.polyvore.com
 
2012-11-25 08:44:32 PM
Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear
 
2012-11-25 08:47:32 PM

Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear


Offsite backups, how the hell do they work?
 
2012-11-25 09:06:17 PM
i48.tinypic.com
 
2012-11-25 09:36:07 PM

Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear


i105.photobucket.com

What Arthur Jumbles might look like.
 
2012-11-25 10:03:41 PM

doglover: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

Offsite backups, how the hell do they work?


Indeed
 
2012-11-25 10:36:41 PM
You can bet your ass the Russians and the Chinese are already working on them.
 
2012-11-25 10:46:37 PM
Seems like something that should have already been invented.
 
2012-11-25 10:46:49 PM

Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear


What-everrr, Mr. Durden!

But seriously, this is good news... for electric cars.

An EMP of any useful size would require a LOT of stored juice. If they can get the kind of power density to make it grenade-sized... Good news, everybody, we have 300 mile range EVs that you can drive in the winter.
 
2012-11-25 10:48:30 PM

doglover: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

Offsite backups, how the hell do they work?


I used to work for one of the larger storage companies. We were asked for an estimate to create disaster recovery / business continuity capabilities for a major oil company, at the time they kept everything onsite. They were interested in synchronous data replication, offsite backups, that sort of thing. We told them the price, they declined. While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.
 
2012-11-25 10:50:02 PM
i16.photobucket.com

Do they look something like this? 


/Diabolical
 
2012-11-25 10:51:29 PM

Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear


Great. Now Hollywood is gonna remake Wisdom.
 
2012-11-25 10:52:02 PM

Mister Peejay: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

What-everrr, Mr. Durden!

But seriously, this is good news... for electric cars.

An EMP of any useful size would require a LOT of stored juice. If they can get the kind of power density to make it grenade-sized... Good news, everybody, we have 300 mile range EVs that you can drive in the winter.


Shot down in flames by Top Gear and the NTSA:

Lithium-Ion batteries suck in cold, and take more energy to get up to working temperature than they put out at peak operating capacity. Hydrogen, without parallel is where we're going. Hydrogen-hybrid, actually. Ford, Honda and Toyota have already announced that they're going to have models available by 2025.
 
2012-11-25 10:52:14 PM
Well, we are going to need them to counter any chinese development of powered armor.
 
2012-11-25 10:54:42 PM

timujin: doglover: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

Offsite backups, how the hell do they work?

I used to work for one of the larger storage companies. We were asked for an estimate to create disaster recovery / business continuity capabilities for a major oil company, at the time they kept everything onsite. They were interested in synchronous data replication, offsite backups, that sort of thing. We told them the price, they declined. While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.


10 years ago the internet was a different beast.
 
2012-11-25 10:54:52 PM

Mister Peejay: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

What-everrr, Mr. Durden!

But seriously, this is good news... for electric cars.

An EMP of any useful size would require a LOT of stored juice. If they can get the kind of power density to make it grenade-sized... Good news, everybody, we have 300 mile range EVs that you can drive in the winter.


I'm guessing that the DoD is looking for something closer to an Explosively Pumped Flux Compression Generator. Yes, I just used those words. No, they're not from Back To The Future.
 
2012-11-25 10:56:30 PM

mamoru: I'm sure they will come in handy for taking out sentry bots in abandoned underground military facilities in both the DC area and the Mojave desert, some 200 years after the nuclear war with the Chinese.


Or you could get a dog.
 
2012-11-25 11:05:11 PM
Next they'll be wanting a sticky grenade and you'll have n00bs everywhere going for that combo.
 
2012-11-25 11:07:02 PM
What could possibly go wrong?

They might blow up?
 
2012-11-25 11:08:27 PM

Jedekai: Shot down in flames by Top Gear and the NTSA:


I love Top Gear more than pretty much anyone should I have every episode and have watched most of them at least 3 times.

That said... Clarkson hates electric cars and has always been unfair to them. I've driven electric cars (and driven them hard) and gotten more or less the range I was told to expect.

I'll trust them on just about anything review wise... but not on electrics.

/Oh, and Jezza's review of the RX-8 pissed me off too. Talks about how great it is and best car of the year and blah blah.. then he melts the damned tires on it, and proceeds to drive it home in the rain and complains that it's squirrelly in the rain. Well.. DUH. You burned off the damned treads making the film.
 
2012-11-25 11:08:34 PM
Triple damage versus mechs and robots.
 
2012-11-25 11:11:32 PM

2wolves: When was the last time the US went to war with a tech enabled for?


Im guessing when these:

www.bhcso.org

+

www.ruwenzori.net

Started to equal:

www.featurepics.com

farm4.staticflickr.com
 
2012-11-25 11:12:22 PM
TFA: To be sure, a non-explosive grenade could use "pulse compression" to blast a very short but fierce electrical pulse while compressing intellectual current

Ah. Kinda like a fark religion thread.
 
2012-11-25 11:13:18 PM
venturefans.org
 
2012-11-25 11:17:17 PM

reddfrogg: [i16.photobucket.com image 513x288]

Do they look something like this? 


/Diabolical


1.bp.blogspot.com
Get out of my head!
 
2012-11-25 11:17:43 PM
I'm still waiting for my BFG 9000.
 
2012-11-25 11:20:46 PM

skinink: I'm still waiting for my BFG 9000.


Hitler had one more like the Quake II "BIG Gun"

Saddam also.

Moral of the story: Railway guns suck.
 
2012-11-25 11:20:53 PM

gaslight: Setting off all sorts of bombs, including your own, electrocution, frying all electronics in the field of effect, including ones you don't want fried like civilian infrastructure, cars telephones, insulin pumps and pacemakers.


Test them over there so they cops can use them over here in 10 years.
 
2012-11-25 11:21:24 PM

Fubini:
I'm guessing that the DoD is looking for something closer to an Explosively Pumped Flux Compression Generator. Yes, I just used those words. No, they're not from Back To The Future.


Yeah, it'll pretty much have to be. But man, something hand held - gonna be rough.
 
2012-11-25 11:22:41 PM

doglover: skinink: I'm still waiting for my BFG 9000.

Hitler had one more like the Quake II "BIG Gun"

Saddam also.

Moral of the story: Railway guns suck.

 

i1171.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-25 11:36:07 PM
Frisbee shaped. Very fine copper wires, say an inch square, in a band around the nearly outer rim. the very outer rim is a ceramic band (non emp blocking) with an inch of c4, or a higher velocity explosive if you can find one. The interior is filled with aerogel capacitor material. The aerogel supercaps are amazing, if you havent played with one, a cubic centimeter has a capacity of one farad. Thats right, not any kind of MICRO farad. One cc, ONE FARAD. That is a lot of juice. Timer, set, pull the pin, fling the frisbee, on a timer the aerogel dumps the juice into the fine wires, a small explosive dumps the aerogel out of the disk, the c4 goes off, and the fine wires, running high amperage high voltage are already about to melt from the juice, find themselves going from a ring a foot across to an inch across.

Did the math once, for about 100 feet the emp is equivalent to being 10 miles from a nuke going off. Construction costs, really not that much more than a claymore mine, since mass producing that much of the aerogel would likely drive it's costs down.
 
2012-11-25 11:42:50 PM

Jedekai:
Lithium-Ion batteries suck in cold, and take more energy to get up to working temperature than they put out at peak operating capacity.


Won't Global Warming solve that problem for us?
 
2012-11-25 11:54:32 PM

StoPPeRmobile: doglover: skinink: I'm still waiting for my BFG 9000.

Hitler had one more like the Quake II "BIG Gun"

Saddam also.

Moral of the story: Railway guns suck. 

[i1171.photobucket.com image 440x276]


Not railgun, railway gun.

/biri-biri
 
2012-11-26 12:00:10 AM
http://i.ytimg.com/vi/J1afFOpG_kE/0.jpg

We are getting closer and closer to deus ex world every day

Now all we need is the Grey Death and UNATCO and we are there.
 
2012-11-26 12:07:01 AM
images.wikia.com

What an electromagnetic pulse hand grenade's target may look like.

/hot like the Mojave Wasteland
 
2012-11-26 12:16:16 AM
All we have to do is have little makeshift faraday cages for EVERYTHING including the vehicles nearby anytime one of these is used. :P
 
2012-11-26 12:30:13 AM

OtherLittleGuy: [www.polyvore.com image 300x300]


Hey man, if we end up with people like her...well, that's a risk I'm willing to take.

\loved that show
\\hated how it ended
 
2012-11-26 12:30:45 AM

cretinbob: [www.gamesprays.com image 256x256]


Ah, TFC. I was the king of forward defense, sneaking into enemy bases and setting up all my buildings. The whole enemy team was trying to take down my sentry while heavies and demos are pouring out of my teleporter; elsewhere, a scout takes a leisurely stroll with the flag. When I finally got overwhelmed:
1) Charge into crowd of enemies
2) FFGFGFFGFGF
3) Repeat
 
2012-11-26 12:34:29 AM

doglover: timujin: doglover: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

Offsite backups, how the hell do they work?

I used to work for one of the larger storage companies. We were asked for an estimate to create disaster recovery / business continuity capabilities for a major oil company, at the time they kept everything onsite. They were interested in synchronous data replication, offsite backups, that sort of thing. We told them the price, they declined. While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.

10 years ago the internet was a different beast.


Indeed. I guess the entire point of my boring story was that some companies don't always do what's in their best interest when it comes to safeguarding their data.
 
2012-11-26 12:48:18 AM
upload.wikimedia.org

...says it's about time.
 
2012-11-26 12:49:28 AM
Approves:
25.media.tumblr.com

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
may also be available, as a special order.
 
2012-11-26 12:52:01 AM

RyansPrivates: [upload.wikimedia.org image 303x364]

...says it's about time.


Pfft, just hack the security panel and turn the bots against the guards. A whole lot less risk.
 
2012-11-26 12:53:10 AM

Marine1: [images.wikia.com image 705x715]

What an electromagnetic pulse hand grenade's target may look like.

/hot like the Mojave Wasteland


Fit them to 40mm shell form and we're good to go.
 
2012-11-26 01:15:36 AM

timujin: While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.


Right.... If home built EMPs could have been done 10 years ago, we would have seen them used by now.
 
2012-11-26 01:26:34 AM

timujin: I used to work for one of the larger storage companies. We were asked for an estimate to create disaster recovery / business continuity capabilities for a major oil company, at the time they kept everything onsite. They were interested in synchronous data replication, offsite backups, that sort of thing. We told them the price, they declined. While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.


In 2002, I applied for a job at a French reinsurance company, for a job to put a digital assets management in place. They wanted to implement this system, because their American branch was located in the World Trade center, and they lost ALL their documents pertaining to their American business.
The interview process was cut short, because a new CEO arrived, and his first order was to stop all recruitment, and cancel new projects.
So, basically, disaster recovery is always a great priority for companies, until they see the price tag. Even when they personnally experienced disaster.
 
2012-11-26 01:41:50 AM

doglover: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

Offsite backups, how the hell do they work?


not to mention, cutting power doesnt erase stored data. wtf?
 
2012-11-26 02:27:53 AM
The prototype will be mounted on a heavy cruiser and require its own nuclear reactor, but they'll get it smaller in time.
 
2012-11-26 02:50:36 AM

cretinbob: reddfrogg: [i16.photobucket.com image 513x288]

Do they look something like this? 


/Diabolical

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 400x272]
Get out of my head!


Hold it, Spengo! That's MY wife you've got there, that's MY planet you're blowing up, and THAT'S... ... ...that's just some guy I met! But still, I think this whole thing has gone just a little too far!
 
2012-11-26 03:09:10 AM

doglover: timujin: doglover: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

Offsite backups, how the hell do they work?

I used to work for one of the larger storage companies. We were asked for an estimate to create disaster recovery / business continuity capabilities for a major oil company, at the time they kept everything onsite. They were interested in synchronous data replication, offsite backups, that sort of thing. We told them the price, they declined. While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.

10 years ago the internet was a different beast.


Nah some places still don't understand these things. Try running a maneuver out of the Buchanan County's law enforcement playbook. 2 months ago one of their systems started failing and affected a number of backups. They didn't fix it and lost their data last week so they are back to using paper records.

Link
 
2012-11-26 03:11:12 AM

Handsome B. Wonderful: timujin: While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.

Right.... If home built EMPs could have been done 10 years ago, we would have seen them used by now.


They could. You still don't see them being used, but you can get instructions on how to build one with a quick Google search.
 
2012-11-26 03:17:05 AM

timujin: Handsome B. Wonderful: timujin: While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.

Right.... If home built EMPs could have been done 10 years ago, we would have seen them used by now.

They could. You still don't see them being used, but you can get instructions on how to build one with a quick Google search.


Just like cell phone and other signals jammers. I'd love to have one for my car since it would knock out everyone's cellphone around me but at the same time they are illegal.
 
2012-11-26 03:19:09 AM

OtherLittleGuy: [www.polyvore.com image 300x300]


Mmm, loved that show when I was in middle school. Watched it again in high school and thought it was terrible.
Still have that crush on her though (and Sin City was great).
Oh, and emp grenades for US soldiers isn't a bad idea (assuming they work right) it's just progression. As stated above it'll be useful against skynet and more realistic foes.
 
2012-11-26 03:24:32 AM

Tenatra: timujin: Handsome B. Wonderful: timujin: While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.

Right.... If home built EMPs could have been done 10 years ago, we would have seen them used by now.

They could. You still don't see them being used, but you can get instructions on how to build one with a quick Google search.

Just like cell phone and other signals jammers. I'd love to have one for my car since it would knock out everyone's cellphone around me but at the same time they are illegal.


I've thought about building one just for movies in a theater. I have not researched this at all so what are the chances I'd be caught using one?
CSB:
When I saw Skyfall the most annoying person wasn't my drunk friend talking about his 55 Bel Air but the eight year old girl walking up and down the steps over and over WEARING SHOES THAT HAD FLASHING LIGHTS. Her parent's told her to sit down a couple times but she didn't listen and they didn't follow up.
 
2012-11-26 03:25:45 AM
Why, Gomer, that's not my hardened command and control network!

Well, surprise, surprise, surprise, Lou-ann, that's not my little HPM!
 
2012-11-26 03:34:13 AM
They could force my computer to reboot -- NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
 
2012-11-26 03:42:44 AM

Devmapall: I've thought about building one just for movies in a theater. I have not researched this at all so what are the chances I'd be caught using one?


It is highly unlikely that anyone around you is going to know that it is you that is creating the dead spot unless one of your buddies that is in on it decides to out you. The FCC created a Jammer Tip Line to have a place to report sellers or users of jamming devices. If you end up doing it then do not purchase it from a company, the FCC started going after sellers last month and they have to give the information of people that purchased devices from them since jammers are contraband.
 
2012-11-26 03:55:49 AM

Tenatra: Devmapall: I've thought about building one just for movies in a theater. I have not researched this at all so what are the chances I'd be caught using one?

It is highly unlikely that anyone around you is going to know that it is you that is creating the dead spot unless one of your buddies that is in on it decides to out you. The FCC created a Jammer Tip Line to have a place to report sellers or users of jamming devices. If you end up doing it then do not purchase it from a company, the FCC started going after sellers last month and they have to give the information of people that purchased devices from them since jammers are contraband.


Jammers are a horrible thing. As someone who is on-call on the weekends, if I don't get a message/call to come in then someone could die or become disabled for life.

/don't jam, call assholes out, or report them to the theatre.
 
2012-11-26 04:05:24 AM

doglover: 10 years ago the internet was a different beast.


It doesn't matter. Any decent company would have already been doing offsite backups way before that. Data replication? Yes, that too, if the data was critical enough.
 
2012-11-26 04:11:25 AM

Vertdang: Tenatra: Devmapall: I've thought about building one just for movies in a theater. I have not researched this at all so what are the chances I'd be caught using one?

It is highly unlikely that anyone around you is going to know that it is you that is creating the dead spot unless one of your buddies that is in on it decides to out you. The FCC created a Jammer Tip Line to have a place to report sellers or users of jamming devices. If you end up doing it then do not purchase it from a company, the FCC started going after sellers last month and they have to give the information of people that purchased devices from them since jammers are contraband.

Jammers are a horrible thing. As someone who is on-call on the weekends, if I don't get a message/call to come in then someone could die or become disabled for life.

/don't jam, call assholes out, or report them to the theatre.


That's a good point. I'm not planning on jamming anyone, I was just curious. It'd be cool to be able to let through "official" channels though.
You still ruin the movie jerk
 
2012-11-26 04:12:27 AM

Vertdang: Jammers are a horrible thing. As someone who is on-call on the weekends, if I don't get a message/call to come in then someone could die or become disabled for life.

/don't jam, call assholes out, or report them to the theatre.


In that sense, and to cover all on call personnel, I understand the necessity for the phone. (I've been there myself) Aside from it being illegal this is the main reason why I won't do it. On the other hand, I've been hit by 2 cars in the last 5 months because of people farking around on cell phones. I was hit last year by another person (not sure if he was on the phone or not but his story didn't make sense.) He said his tools dropped and he tried to pick them up, note that he had a passenger in the company truck that would have been perfectly capable of doing this task. Nope, he slammed it to me at 40+ while I was sitting at a red light.
 
2012-11-26 04:15:15 AM

Tenatra: Vertdang: Jammers are a horrible thing. As someone who is on-call on the weekends, if I don't get a message/call to come in then someone could die or become disabled for life.

/don't jam, call assholes out, or report them to the theatre.

In that sense, and to cover all on call personnel, I understand the necessity for the phone. (I've been there myself) Aside from it being illegal this is the main reason why I won't do it. On the other hand, I've been hit by 2 cars in the last 5 months because of people farking around on cell phones. I was hit last year by another person (not sure if he was on the phone or not but his story didn't make sense.) He said his tools dropped and he tried to pick them up, note that he had a passenger in the company truck that would have been perfectly capable of doing this task. Nope, he slammed it to me at 40+ while I was sitting at a red light.


As stupid as it is to text and drive, jamming a movie theater has nothing to do with it. I also think that driving around with a jammer would be bad news.
 
2012-11-26 04:40:17 AM

timujin: doglover: timujin: doglover: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

Offsite backups, how the hell do they work?

I used to work for one of the larger storage companies. We were asked for an estimate to create disaster recovery / business continuity capabilities for a major oil company, at the time they kept everything onsite. They were interested in synchronous data replication, offsite backups, that sort of thing. We told them the price, they declined. While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.

10 years ago the internet was a different beast.

Indeed. I guess the entire point of my boring story was that some companies don't always do what's in their best interest when it comes to safeguarding their data.


Major oil company is not the same as credit information.

You burn an oil company's HQ to the ground, they still have infrastructure and oil. They lose some documents, have a headache for a few months gettin' things straight. The money never stops flowing in.

Credit is nothing but data. You lose the info, you've lost the entire business. There is literally nothing else credit is but names and figures. Those go up, it's gone. They tend to safeguard their data more religiously.
 
2012-11-26 04:52:29 AM

Shadow Blasko: I love Top Gear more than pretty much anyone should I have every episode and have watched most of them at least 3 times


Whilst Clarkson is a complete ass (at least that is the stage persona) he does make good and valid points as far as EV's go. We're being sold them on the false notion that an EV can outright replace an IC engined car. It can't. It won't do 300+ miles 'to the tank', it won't take 5min to 'fill back up' and any EV that is capable of behaving like an IC car costs substantially more than the IC powered version if it even exists.

Can an EV be used for the average commute? Yes. But it would require roll-on roll-off trains to carry them the bulk of the journey, leaving the EV to deal with getting you to/from your nearest train station and the final hump to work.

I have yet to even hear about government proposals to instigate this (and look at allocating the funding needed to overhaul the multitude of stations to accommodate).

So yeah, an EMP grenade and its requirement for energy could lead to interesting things for EV's in the future.
 
2012-11-26 05:49:48 AM

doglover: timujin: doglover: timujin: doglover: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

Offsite backups, how the hell do they work?

I used to work for one of the larger storage companies. We were asked for an estimate to create disaster recovery / business continuity capabilities for a major oil company, at the time they kept everything onsite. They were interested in synchronous data replication, offsite backups, that sort of thing. We told them the price, they declined. While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.

10 years ago the internet was a different beast.

Indeed. I guess the entire point of my boring story was that some companies don't always do what's in their best interest when it comes to safeguarding their data.

Major oil company is not the same as credit information.

You burn an oil company's HQ to the ground, they still have infrastructure and oil. They lose some documents, have a headache for a few months gettin' things straight. The money never stops flowing in.

Credit is nothing but data. You lose the info, you've lost the entire business. There is literally nothing else credit is but names and figures. Those go up, it's gone. They tend to safeguard their data more religiously.


Every digital record, including things like contracts, banking info, email, and employee information is a little different than "some documents". It would be crippling for any business.
 
2012-11-26 05:55:12 AM
syndicate.lubie.org
 
2012-11-26 06:02:17 AM
EVs suck now, but the point made upthread was a pretty clear one. The military industrial complex drives innovation, and that usually bleeds into the private sector. You all can't be too stupid to have not understood that.
 
2012-11-26 06:14:26 AM
Cool.

There go your GPS, night vision gear, communications...
 
2012-11-26 06:41:04 AM

Smidge204: [syndicate.lubie.org image 214x279]


Syndicate Wars?
 
2012-11-26 07:01:18 AM

Vaneshi: Can an EV be used for the average commute? Yes. But it would require roll-on roll-off trains to carry them the bulk of the journey, leaving the EV to deal with getting you to/from your nearest train station and the final hump to work.


Where do you live that an "average commute" exceeds 300 miles?

According to the Department of Transportation, 35-54 males drive the most every year: 18,858 miles, on average for 2000 (I'm sure the numbers have changed a little since then, but let's just go with that for now). For the sake of the exercise, let's say they drive the same distance every day of the year. That means they drive roughly 52 miles per day, well within the range of electric cars.

Are there edge cases where electric cars aren't suitable? Certainly. Are electric cars adequate for all purposes and in all situations? No, not at all. However, for the bulk of driving is well within the range of current electric vehicles and their use for common, everyday driving like commuting would significantly reduce fossil fuel consumption and pollution.
 
2012-11-26 07:31:02 AM
If they say they want them they probably already have them.
 
mhd
2012-11-26 08:03:30 AM
Noooo, my precious uptime!
 
2012-11-26 08:17:48 AM

calufrax: Cool.

There go your GPS, night vision gear, communications...


Depending on whether or not if they found a "new" method to damage electronics, chances are that alot of existing military equipment is already shielded against EMP. Any army that plans to fight after the nukes drop would have installed basic countermeasures.

I'd imagine this kind of thing is for shorting civilian networks and power grids.

Take for example the attack in Mumbai. Civilians and news reporters were inadvertently tweeting critical information to the terrorists handlers, helping them to prepare for when the counter terrorism units attacked.
Hindsight being 20/20, If I was on the black cats team and had this kind of weapon then I'd have dropped one right by the hotel.

My equipment would survive, everyone elses malfunctions, leaving my men with the advantage.
 
2012-11-26 08:28:41 AM

calufrax: Cool.

There go your GPS, night vision gear, communications...


Not mine communications. Kind of hard to fry a piece of tube gear with something the size of a grenade.
 
2012-11-26 09:19:38 AM

gaslight: Setting off all sorts of bombs, including your own, electrocution, frying all electronics in the field of effect, including ones you don't want fried like civilian infrastructure, cars telephones, insulin pumps and pacemakers.


And the question I came to ask is answered in the very Boobies. (sniff) I love FARK so much.
 
2012-11-26 09:26:59 AM

heypete: That means they drive roughly 52 miles per day, well within the range of electric cars.


And that's bollocks for a start. 52 miles one way and I might start believing those figures were even remotely accurate.

You need to do 100+ miles with only a 6 - 7 hour recharge cycle from a 30amp unit. Factor in running the radio, headlights and heater as well. Once home it gets another 6 - 7 hours of recharge from anything from a 13amp to 30amp unit.

I'm sorry no. Your EV won't make it to the end of the week as at no point other than the weekends is it theoretically left standing long enough to fully recharge. Friday night you'll be walking 60 odd miles down the motorway.

Ohh and that'd not the DoT, that's the US highways commission and nothing to do with it. Yanks have different city layouts so your point is utterly invalid.
 
2012-11-26 09:57:19 AM

Vaneshi: And that's bollocks for a start. 52 miles one way and I might start believing those figures were even remotely accurate.


Wait, you think the average American drives further than 52 miles each way for their commute?

I'm sorry, but the census disagrees: "Mean travel time to work (minutes). 25.1 +/- 0.1". Only about 15% of people commute more than 45 minutes each way.

If we use your numbers and say that someone only commutes to work 300 days a year (two months vacation, not bad) and only uses their car for commuting and for no other purpose that means they put on 104 miles each day for a total of 31,200 miles per year...which is more than double the Edmunds True Cost of Ownership baseline.

Your numbers seem way off.

You need to do 100+ miles with only a 6 - 7 hour recharge cycle from a 30amp unit. Factor in running the radio, headlights and heater as well. Once home it gets another 6 - 7 hours of recharge from anything from a 13amp to 30amp unit.

I'm sorry no. Your EV won't make it to the end of the week as at no point other than the weekends is it theoretically left standing long enough to fully recharge. Friday night you'll be walking 60 odd miles down the motorway.


Uh-huh...and the source for your numbers are what, exactly?

Even so, the Nissan Leaf can fully charge in about 7.5 hours on a 230V/15A circuit and has a range of about 100 miles. You'd easily be able to do an average round-trip commute without needing to charge and still only have about 50% charge. Charging it overnight or during the workday at one's employer would keep it fully topped off.

Ohh and that'd not the DoT, that's the US highways commission and nothing to do with it. Yanks have different city layouts so your point is utterly invalid.

lolwut.

Perhaps you missed the little bit at the bottom that said "United States Department of Transportation - Federal Highway Administration", or the fact that it's under the dot.gov domain? I think that's what one would call an "authoritative source". If you've got different numbers from some other authoritative source I'd be interested in seeing them.

I'm not really sure what your point about "yanks" having "different city layouts" is or why it makes my point invalid. I'm an American, I've commuted to work for years. While I know that the plural of "anecdote" is not "data", the census and DoT numbers seem to jive with personal experience. I now live in Switzerland and take the train (which is nice) but that's not really important.
 
2012-11-26 12:03:30 PM
Here is the problem: Even *BEFORE* I had a 100 mile round-trip commute, I still wouldn't have purchased an electric car with a 100 mile range.

That's because any car I own can't just be a single-use vehicle. I have relatives that I visit that live 60 miles away, and I couldn't depend on a car with a 100 mile range to get me there and back in the winter, not to mention going on somewhat longer trips for vacation and the like.

Of course, you could say "Just rent a conventional car for the exceptions", but then I've got to incur an additional cost over and above just owning the electric car, which costs more than a comparable conventional car to begin with.

I've done the math, and quite frankly, if saving money is the motivation, you are better off buying a cheap but fuel-efficient econobox than you are buying an electric car.
 
2012-11-26 12:11:30 PM

Shadow Blasko: Jedekai: Shot down in flames by Top Gear and the NTSA:

I love Top Gear more than pretty much anyone should I have every episode and have watched most of them at least 3 times.

That said... Clarkson hates electric cars and has always been unfair to them. I've driven electric cars (and driven them hard) and gotten more or less the range I was told to expect.

I'll trust them on just about anything review wise... but not on electrics.

/Oh, and Jezza's review of the RX-8 pissed me off too. Talks about how great it is and best car of the year and blah blah.. then he melts the damned tires on it, and proceeds to drive it home in the rain and complains that it's squirrelly in the rain. Well.. DUH. You burned off the damned treads making the film.


i enjoyed the episode where James May drove the hydrogen Honda in California. Solid info that left me asking why we don't invest more in hydrogen. I've been told since - here on fark - that the asplody nature of hydrogen is not good

the fuel mileage test of a Prius vs. M3 was pretty interesting. granted, a Prius wasn't really designed for that kind of driving, but still remarkable to say that an M3 is more fuel efficient than a PrIIIIIIIIIus.

/love top gear
/learned that brits also pronounce Prius differently - heavy on the I - PrIIIIIIIIIIIus - and said with disdain & a foul taste in your mouth. also a scowl.
/csb
 
2012-11-26 01:39:16 PM

inner ted: Shadow Blasko: Jedekai: Shot down in flames by Top Gear and the NTSA:

I love Top Gear more than pretty much anyone should I have every episode and have watched most of them at least 3 times.

That said... Clarkson hates electric cars and has always been unfair to them. I've driven electric cars (and driven them hard) and gotten more or less the range I was told to expect.

I'll trust them on just about anything review wise... but not on electrics.

/Oh, and Jezza's review of the RX-8 pissed me off too. Talks about how great it is and best car of the year and blah blah.. then he melts the damned tires on it, and proceeds to drive it home in the rain and complains that it's squirrelly in the rain. Well.. DUH. You burned off the damned treads making the film.

i enjoyed the episode where James May drove the hydrogen Honda in California. Solid info that left me asking why we don't invest more in hydrogen. I've been told since - here on fark - that the asplody nature of hydrogen is not good

the fuel mileage test of a Prius vs. M3 was pretty interesting. granted, a Prius wasn't really designed for that kind of driving, but still remarkable to say that an M3 is more fuel efficient than a PrIIIIIIIIIus.

/love top gear
/learned that brits also pronounce Prius differently - heavy on the I - PrIIIIIIIIIIIus - and said with disdain & a foul taste in your mouth. also a scowl.
/csb


weknowmemes.com

/oblig
 
2012-11-26 01:42:02 PM

Tenatra: doglover: timujin: doglover: Arthur Jumbles: Step 1) Find data center for major banks and the IRS
Step 2) Set off EMP bombs
Step 3) Enjoy the chaos as ownership records disappear

Offsite backups, how the hell do they work?

I used to work for one of the larger storage companies. We were asked for an estimate to create disaster recovery / business continuity capabilities for a major oil company, at the time they kept everything onsite. They were interested in synchronous data replication, offsite backups, that sort of thing. We told them the price, they declined. While I'm sure they finally got their stuff taken care of, there was a time about ten years ago when anyone with a home built EMP could have shut them down.

10 years ago the internet was a different beast.

Nah some places still don't understand these things. Try running a maneuver out of the Buchanan County's law enforcement playbook. 2 months ago one of their systems started failing and affected a number of backups. They didn't fix it and lost their data last week so they are back to using paper records.

Link


Whenver I see stuff like this I'm always thinking someone is trying to cover something up.
 
2012-11-26 02:06:51 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: [i48.tinypic.com image 245x403]


no... just.... no... you had to add that to this thread...
 
2012-11-26 02:12:32 PM

StoPPeRmobile: Whenver I see stuff like this I'm always thinking someone is trying to cover something up.


Like a lack of budget increases due to voters not wanting their property taxes to go up?
 
2012-11-26 02:47:50 PM

red5ish: The prototype will be mounted on a heavy cruiser and require its own nuclear reactor, but they'll get it smaller in time.


I think most of us know that nuclear explosions with little-to-no atmosphere create EMPs, but ... how do you create one with ... ya know, no nukes?
 
2012-11-26 03:47:25 PM

zarberg: red5ish: The prototype will be mounted on a heavy cruiser and require its own nuclear reactor, but they'll get it smaller in time.

I think most of us know that nuclear explosions with little-to-no atmosphere create EMPs, but ... how do you create one with ... ya know, no nukes?


Nukes did it on a large scale.
If I understand correctly, you're just dumping electrons into the air.

/I'd imagine its some kind of funky tesla coil.
/one countermeasure is to wrap a cage of metal around it and wire that to ground.
 
2012-11-26 07:30:15 PM

heypete:

Even so, the Nissan Leaf can fully charge in about 7.5 hours on a 230V/15A circuit and has a range of about 100 miles. You'd easily be able to do an average round-trip commute without needing to charge and still only have about 50% charge. Charging it overnight or during the workday at one's employer would keep it fully topped off.



There is another option to side-step charging time. Imagine a gas station that replaces your car's power source. If the car is designed for it and we can get our power source (battery is a loaded word) standardized, it could work. You'll have to decide how many power sources to stock, and there are other logistical concerns, but I can't see any impossibilities in it.
 
2012-11-26 08:09:01 PM

Can't_Think_Of_A_Name: heypete:

Even so, the Nissan Leaf can fully charge in about 7.5 hours on a 230V/15A circuit and has a range of about 100 miles. You'd easily be able to do an average round-trip commute without needing to charge and still only have about 50% charge. Charging it overnight or during the workday at one's employer would keep it fully topped off.



There is another option to side-step charging time. Imagine a gas station that replaces your car's power source. If the car is designed for it and we can get our power source (battery is a loaded word) standardized, it could work. You'll have to decide how many power sources to stock, and there are other logistical concerns, but I can't see any impossibilities in it.


Closest to that seems to be BBQ propane tanks. But the batteries are significantly more expensive. People will abuse them and someone else will be stuck with the crappy one.

Fuel cell.
 
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