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(Mirror.co.uk)   Our long national nightmare is over. Behold: the chocolate bar that doesn't melt   (mirror.co.uk) divider line 32
    More: Cool, Willy Wonka, Cadburys, nightmares, American food, melts  
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1729 clicks; posted to Business » on 25 Nov 2012 at 6:08 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



32 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-11-25 02:51:07 PM  
I hope it melts in your mouth, not in your hand.
 
2012-11-25 03:16:34 PM  
Part of what makes chocolate so enjoyable is that it melts at body temperature. Chocolate that won't melt in your mouth sounds like it would be far less enjoyable.
 
2012-11-25 03:29:30 PM  
Uh... what about WW II tropical chocolate bars?
 
2012-11-25 04:08:25 PM  
Sounds like it's soon to become "the poop that doesn't poop."
 
2012-11-25 04:23:04 PM  
God those were awful waxy abominations.
 
2012-11-25 05:01:52 PM  
Isn't Kraft a Canadian company?
 
2012-11-25 05:25:29 PM  
That sounds gross.
 
2012-11-25 05:53:13 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Uh... what about WW II tropical chocolate bars?


Maybe they made one that doesn't suck?
 
2012-11-25 06:09:09 PM  

Shostie: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Uh... what about WW II tropical chocolate bars?

Maybe they made one that doesn't suck?


Well, yeah... there's that

/just sayin' it's not like a new idea
 
2012-11-25 06:11:01 PM  
let me guess, Wonka made it
 
2012-11-25 06:18:44 PM  
"chocolate"
 
2012-11-25 06:31:30 PM  
"... the so-called 'conching step' - where a container filled with metal beads grinds the ingredients, which usually include cocoa butter, vegetable oils (if you're an evil cheap bastard who doesn't give a shiat about quality because cocoa butter is the only fat that has any business being in good chocolate), milk and sugar and all too often this abomination of an ingredient called PGPR plus god knows what else.


This is why I don't buy chocolate anymore unless I'm paying through the nose for a good kind.
 
2012-11-25 06:43:47 PM  
When did 104F become "boiling"?
 
2012-11-25 06:47:36 PM  
Upon further investigation I see you can't even call it "chocolate" in the U.S. if it contains vegetable oil:

21CFR 163.123 Sweet chocolate

21CFR 163.130 Milk chocolate
 
2012-11-25 06:51:54 PM  
Darn that Slugworth!!!!
 
2012-11-25 06:57:05 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Uh... what about WW II tropical chocolate bars?


phaseolus: Upon further investigation I see you can't even call it "chocolate" in the U.S. if it contains vegetable oil:

21CFR 163.123 Sweet chocolate

21CFR 163.130 Milk chocolate



"Not The first chocolate-flavored bar that doesn't melt."

FTFTFA
 
2012-11-25 06:57:44 PM  

dprathbun: When did 104F become "boiling"?


Maybe they meant Celsius. It is the UK after all.
 
2012-11-25 06:57:48 PM  
Also, from Wikipedia: "The most common form of cocoa butter has a melting point of around 34-38 °C (93-100 °F), rendering chocolate a solid at room temperature that readily melts once inside the mouth. Cocoa butter displays polymorphism, having α, γ, β', and β crystals, with melting points of 17, 23, 26, and 35-37 °C respectively." Therefore whatever the hell this Cadbury bar's actually made of, it's not got much if any cocoa butter in the mix if it's still solid at 40°C like the article says.

To sell this in the U.S. they'd have to call it "chocolate flavored candy" just like Palmer labels their flavorless waxy crap.
 
2012-11-25 07:05:34 PM  
I wonder what they have done to the oils in this thing to cause this. Is this the olestra thing all over again?
 
2012-11-25 07:19:40 PM  

Shostie: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Uh... what about WW II tropical chocolate bars?

Maybe they made one that doesn't suck?


Those and later military/emergency-aid heat-tolerant chocolate-based-bars (they're still around) are intended to suck. That's the point. They are high, high energy density foods (like any chocolate), but if they didn't suck balls, you might be tempted to eat them in something short of an emergency, then not have them stockpiled in the emergency.
 
2012-11-25 08:26:26 PM  

Darth_Lukecash: Isn't Kraft a Canadian company?


No, Kraft is an American company that recently split into Kraft and Mondelēz International Inc.
For every share of Kraft you owned, you got a share of Mondelēz and 1/3 of the amount of Kraft.
Mondelēz is international and Kraft is American.
Mondelēz has a better growth potential because it's got it's foot in China already. And the chocolate that doesn't melt is a huge thing because of the consumers by the equator. It's a whole new market.
Hint: buy some Mondelēz stock, hold on to it, plow the dividends back into it. It will grow quick.
 
2012-11-25 08:41:37 PM  
Unfortunately, it's made out of plastic.
 
2012-11-25 08:43:45 PM  
Hershey has been doing this since 1937, says Wiki. And I remember the candy bar they made for the troops in Desert Storm, that supposedly didnt melt in extreme heat.
 
2012-11-25 09:54:21 PM  
They had chocolate bars like that in Ghana 20 years ago. They just used a lot of wax. Yes, the chocolate tasted and felt like it had lots of wax in it.
 
2012-11-26 01:16:49 AM  

cig-mkr: Darth_Lukecash: Isn't Kraft a Canadian company?

No, Kraft is an American company that recently split into Kraft and Mondelēz International Inc.
For every share of Kraft you owned, you got a share of Mondelēz and 1/3 of the amount of Kraft.
Mondelēz is international and Kraft is American.
Mondelēz has a better growth potential because it's got it's foot in China already. And the chocolate that doesn't melt is a huge thing because of the consumers by the equator. It's a whole new market.
Hint: buy some Mondelēz stock, hold on to it, plow the dividends back into it. It will grow quick.


Appropriate name you've got there, since Kraft is owned by a tobacco company (at least in Canada it is).
 
2012-11-26 03:28:49 AM  

phaseolus: Palmer labels their flavorless waxy crap


Palmer is the WORST. It is only good for giving to people you don't really want to give something to.

/or burn it as an emergency fuel source
 
2012-11-26 03:40:04 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Uh... what about WW II tropical chocolate bars?


I too was wondering "I thought we had that already. It was called Field Ration D"
 
2012-11-26 03:46:49 AM  

cig-mkr: Hint: buy some Mondelēz stock, hold on to it, plow the dividends back into it. It will grow quick.


After reading this I was doing some research and apparently somebody who works there is a TFer 

/amusing
 
2012-11-26 03:52:19 AM  
Good luck getting laid without chocolate-dipped strawberries.
 
2012-11-26 06:50:53 AM  

relaxitsjustme: cig-mkr: Hint: buy some Mondelēz stock, hold on to it, plow the dividends back into it. It will grow quick.

After reading this I was doing some research and apparently somebody who works there is a TFer 

/amusing


Or, maybe, just someone who knows how to spell backwards.
 
2012-11-26 11:35:46 AM  
Kraft is an American company, although it has a subsidiary in Canada, Kraft Foods Canada Inc, which makes the famous (or infamous) Kraft Dinner, beloved of impecunious Canadians and late night drunk cooks.

Tropical chocolate has been around for a long time.

Canadian chocolatiers, the Ganong family of New Brunswick, claim that one of the early Ganongs had the idea of taking bars of chocolate on his salmon fishing trips, wrapped in tin foil. The Ganongs claim that a large American chocolate manufacturer got the idea from them at a trade show in the early 1900s.

In fact, cooking chocolate had long been made into bars, and eating chocolate may have been made into bars as early as the 1840s, so neither the Canadian nor the American claims hold water for chocolate.

It may seem redundant to say "eating chocolate" (or "eating licorice") but this term is used to distinguish the confection from the raw chocolate which has to be processed to be palatable to the average consumer. Some people, of course, like the waxy baking, somewhat bitter, baking chocolate. Personally I go to 75%, perhaps 85% cocoa, but pure chocolate is unpleasant in mouth feel and flavour.

Since the chocolate bar dates to about 1900, the tropical chocolate bars can't be much earlier than WWI even in the British Empire.

Hershey's much improved tropical chocolate bar of 1943 is now a museum piece at the Smithsonian:

http://newsdesk.si.edu/snapshot/hershey-s-tropical-chocolate-bar

It was commissioned by the military. The specs were a four ounce bar that resisted melting and had a high nutritional and energy value.
 
2012-11-26 12:15:12 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: cig-mkr: Darth_Lukecash: Isn't Kraft a Canadian company?

No, Kraft is an American company that recently split into Kraft and Mondelēz International Inc.
For every share of Kraft you owned, you got a share of Mondelēz and 1/3 of the amount of Kraft.
Mondelēz is international and Kraft is American.
Mondelēz has a better growth potential because it's got it's foot in China already. And the chocolate that doesn't melt is a huge thing because of the consumers by the equator. It's a whole new market.
Hint: buy some Mondelēz stock, hold on to it, plow the dividends back into it. It will grow quick.

Appropriate name you've got there, since Kraft is owned by a tobacco company (at least in Canada it is).


Actually Philip Morrris owned Kraft at one time but spun it off along with 80% of Miller Beer.
 
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