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(TG Daily)   Scientists use sunlight to produce steam without boiling water   (tgdaily.com) divider line 38
    More: Interesting, sunlight, desalinations, water purification, distillates, nanotechnology, steam, American Chemical Society, nanoparticles  
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3585 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Nov 2012 at 4:20 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-11-24 10:52:01 PM
...metalic nanoparticles illuminated by light can be brought to 212 degrees Fahrenheit, the boiling point of water, much faster than water.

Wait, what?

Using new nanoparticle technology to enhance already existent steam powered tech makes it work more efficiently?

That actually *is* interesting.

Make it so.
 
2012-11-24 10:52:35 PM
FTA: "The potential societal benefits are staggering," said Paul Weiss, Ph.D., editor-in-chief of ACS Nano.

"They include more energy-efficient distillation of alcohol,
" ...


Say no more.

I'm in.
 
2012-11-24 11:08:12 PM
This sounds positively revolutionary.
 
2012-11-24 11:51:24 PM
Neat.
 
2012-11-25 12:24:44 AM
This sounds too good to be true. There has to be some bullshiat, or a "but..." somewhere

Or an "unfortunately, it will take two to three thousand years to bring the technology to market..."
 
2012-11-25 01:04:19 AM
As we call it, fog.
 
2012-11-25 01:11:30 AM
I'm hoping and guessing that the quantity of nanoparticles used would not be enough that if they got flushed (or flooded or tsunamied) into water outside the facility that it would not start boiling water and everything in it.

Otherwise, sounds cool.
 
2012-11-25 01:14:54 AM

quatchi: ...metalic nanoparticles illuminated by light can be brought to 212 degrees Fahrenheit, the boiling point of water, much faster than water.

Wait, what?

Using new nanoparticle technology to enhance already existent steam powered tech makes it work more efficiently?

That actually *is* interesting.

Make it so.


OH LOOK!
If we toss hots rocks in the water, the water around the rocks will get REALLY hot and some of it will turn to steam.
/yes, I realize that higher surface area of the nano-particles = more steam, but still
 
2012-11-25 02:54:36 AM
that's hot. got nuthin
 
2012-11-25 03:16:07 AM
No. They did not.

They boiled water in a very localized way. Which is pretty neat. But you don't get steam without that phase change.
 
2012-11-25 03:57:53 AM

Amos Quito: FTA: "The potential societal benefits are staggering," said Paul Weiss, Ph.D., editor-in-chief of ACS Nano.

"They include more energy-efficient distillation of alcohol," ...


Say no more.

I'm in.


But do you really want to ingest these nano particle? I bet the can't filter them all out.

Think about what would happen when you go out in the sunlight. You'll boil, or even worse, sparkle.
 
2012-11-25 04:29:52 AM

EvilEgg: Amos Quito: FTA: "The potential societal benefits are staggering," said Paul Weiss, Ph.D., editor-in-chief of ACS Nano.

"They include more energy-efficient distillation of alcohol," ...


Say no more.

I'm in.

But do you really want to ingest these nano particle? I bet the can't filter them all out.

Think about what would happen when you go out in the sunlight. You'll boil, or even worse, sparkle.


But just think how much pre-teen/MILFy tail you could get!
 
2012-11-25 04:53:00 AM

Asa Phelps: They boiled water in a very localized way. Which is pretty neat. But you don't get steam without that phase change.


But you can increase solar distillation output on non-ideal days.
 
2012-11-25 05:06:33 AM
And glass makers rejoiced.

Sounds pretty cool as long as the nanoparticles themselves are too dense to be carried up with the vapour, else you'll constantly have to top up and have non-potable water.
 
2012-11-25 05:09:39 AM
Well, more like they boiled water in very specific way, by raising the temperature of bits of it fast enough that it doesn't raise the temperature of the rest before it boils, reducing the overall energy cost and increasing the controllability of the process.

Still farking cool, admittedly.
 
2012-11-25 05:21:20 AM

Summoner101: EvilEgg: Amos Quito: FTA: "The potential societal benefits are staggering," said Paul Weiss, Ph.D., editor-in-chief of ACS Nano.

"They include more energy-efficient distillation of alcohol," ...


Say no more.

I'm in.

But do you really want to ingest these nano particle? I bet the can't filter them all out.

Think about what would happen when you go out in the sunlight. You'll boil, or even worse, sparkle.

But just think how much pre-teen/MILFy tail you could get!


How the HELL do you get a Pre-Teen Milf?

/don't answer that
 
2012-11-25 05:24:22 AM
All this guy needs is a coded tape to control it.

theseventhart.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-11-25 05:34:43 AM

Smoking GNU: Summoner101: EvilEgg: Amos Quito: FTA: "The potential societal benefits are staggering," said Paul Weiss, Ph.D., editor-in-chief of ACS Nano.

"They include more energy-efficient distillation of alcohol," ...


Say no more.

I'm in.

But do you really want to ingest these nano particle? I bet the can't filter them all out.

Think about what would happen when you go out in the sunlight. You'll boil, or even worse, sparkle.

But just think how much pre-teen/MILFy tail you could get!

How the HELL do you get a Pre-Teen Milf?

/don't answer that


Quite easily, apparently.
 
2012-11-25 06:08:00 AM

Smoking GNU: How the HELL do you get a Pre-Teen Milf?


Use Martian years. 1 martian year =1.8 earth years.

10 years old is legal. Many Milfs would be pre-teens.

Using Jovian years, EVERYONE would be pre-teen.

Just don't use Mercurial years. "My girlfriend just turned 126 and now all she talks about is kids!"
 
2012-11-25 06:17:30 AM
Meh,the nanoparticles cannot heat the water any more efficiently than the amount of sunlight they can absorb. Crowd them in too much in solution and they shadow themselves, even if sunlight is set up to be multidirectional. Too sparse and not enough return on steam.

Maybe the best way would be to embed those nanoparticles in a solid state matrix, arranged densely under a transparent layer with a thin flow of water between.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-11-25 06:36:59 AM

ecmoRandomNumbers: This sounds too good to be true. There has to be some bullshiat, or a "but..." somewhere

Or an "unfortunately, it will take two to three thousand years to bring the technology to market..."


Well, that's because they are boiling water. They just aren't bringing it all to a boil at once.
 
2012-11-25 06:40:32 AM
Water is transparent (to a degree) so you shine sunlight through it, and some of the light passes right through, leading to inefficient heating.

Solution, add something to the water that's not transparent that the sunlight can hit and heat up.

Another thing you can do is add something to the water that floats, to reduce how much evaporation happens from a reservoir (this also makes for some surreal pictures).

www.eccllc.us
4.bp.blogspot.com

// the only thing new here is the nano scale, it's one of those "why didn't I think of that" things that seems so obvious in retrospect. Someone just had to scale it down.

pathfinderpat.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-11-25 09:44:45 AM
Cool... A guy named William Lear tried this back in the 60's for a steam powered car... the fluid was called Learium.... maybe nanospooge will work better?

The more you know...
 
2012-11-25 09:52:51 AM

WorldCitizen: I'm hoping and guessing that the quantity of nanoparticles used would not be enough that if they got flushed (or flooded or tsunamied) into water outside the facility that it would not start boiling water and everything in it.

Otherwise, sounds cool.


THIS

Before you build something like this, figure out how to turn it off. Remember the lessons of ICE 9.
 
2012-11-25 10:31:15 AM

quatchi: ...metalic nanoparticles illuminated by light can be brought to 212 degrees Fahrenheit, the boiling point of water, much faster than water.

Wait, what?

Using new nanoparticle technology to enhance already existent steam powered tech makes it work more efficiently?

That actually *is* interesting.

Make it so.


Sounds similar to the same "technology" that allows glaciers to melt faster because of Chinese soot all over them.

/this doesn't mean it's not useful
 
2012-11-25 11:35:36 AM
Superheat ...? Dry steam?
 
2012-11-25 12:48:06 PM
Could someone who is smrt in science stuff explain this in simple words and mba could comprehend?
 
2012-11-25 01:23:59 PM
Did they mention the nanoparticles are toxic to blood based life and carcinogenic as well?

Didn't think so.
 
2012-11-25 02:05:16 PM

MBA Whore: Could someone who is smrt in science stuff explain this in simple words and mba could comprehend?



There's a constant flow of energy coming from the Sun, which doesn't really change. While we've known for millennia that we can concentrate and focus it -- mirrors, lenses, whatever -- apparently someone's just invented some stuff that'll get hotter than you'd expect it would when it sees electromagnetic energy such as sunlight, hot enough to vaporize water surrounding its tiny little volume, even though the rest of the water's not quite as warm.

Call it "Leveraging" if ya wanna.
 
2012-11-25 02:20:08 PM

prjindigo: Did they mention the nanoparticles are toxic to blood based life and carcinogenic as well?

Didn't think so.


Well no one's going to be ingesting the stuff. The water that turns to steam separates from the particle before it leaves the nano-boiling water, so the water you boil is still as clean as normal steam. You just have to make sure that the nano-solution doesn't escape its container and somehow enter a water supply. It's a real danger but it's certainly not something they wouldn't take precautions to prevent.
 
2012-11-25 02:27:06 PM

dehehn: prjindigo: Did they mention the nanoparticles are toxic to blood based life and carcinogenic as well?

Didn't think so.

Well no one's going to be ingesting the stuff. The water that turns to steam separates from the particle before it leaves the nano-boiling water, so the water you boil is still as clean as normal steam. You just have to make sure that the nano-solution doesn't escape its container and somehow enter a water supply. It's a real danger but it's certainly not something they wouldn't take precautions to prevent.


Precautions? In my unregulated capitalist free market country? What are you, Canadian?
 
2012-11-25 02:35:12 PM
I'm still having a little trouble wrapping my head around this part:

"...The authors show that sunlight can be used to create steam with virtually no wasteful heating of the surrounding liquid."

Why wouldn't the vapor bubbles cool in contact with the liquid and collapse?
 
2012-11-25 03:41:50 PM

lordargent: Another thing you can do is add something to the water that floats, to reduce how much evaporation happens from a reservoir (this also makes for some surreal pictures).


That's an interesting experiment in macro-scale crystallization.
 
2012-11-25 04:30:52 PM
Steam-9?

/or would that be Vapor-9
/something-9
 
2012-11-25 04:40:53 PM
mmm steam mmm

thinkcreativethinkmod.com
 
2012-11-25 06:34:12 PM
The only use I can see is local water purification. It should be a bit more efficient than a full scale solar collector as you wouldnt have to heat the entire sample of water to 100C, with resulting heat loss. However, it probably wont scale well as the a larger volume would be shadowed by all the nanoparticles in front.
 
2012-11-26 12:07:54 AM

Darth_Lukecash: As we call it, fog.


Fog isn't steam.
 
2012-11-26 11:48:48 AM
So, that gets us closer to steampunk, right?.
 
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