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(The Register)   From the holy crap department: Sailboat goes 59 knots with surreal video   (theregister.co.uk) divider line 61
    More: Cool, sailboats, Isle of Wight, wind turbines  
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7840 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Nov 2012 at 12:27 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-22 09:28:21 PM
The pilot sounded like he was going to shiat his pants when he was up to 55 knots.
 
2012-11-22 10:31:52 PM
Amazing. I've been in powerboats that go that fast and it is never like you are completely in control. One wrong turn of the wheel or hit a wave wrong and you could go flying. To go that fast in a contraption like that takes some balls.
 
2012-11-23 12:12:09 AM
That was frakkin awesome! :D
 
2012-11-23 12:51:57 AM
Apparently this project is funded entirely by the sale of diamonds that this man squeezes out of his arse.

/ Poor yob sounded like he needed new pants by the middle of the run.
// That was shiatballs fast. Woah. Crazy fast. *diamond*
 
2012-11-23 01:08:03 AM
theyearinmusic.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-11-23 01:08:15 AM
That's about as fast as my 30' Baja with twin 454's.
 
2012-11-23 01:08:27 AM
i.imgur.com
 
jvl
2012-11-23 01:13:41 AM
It's a cute trick to design a sailboat like this which doesn't tip over in the wind. But a boat that can only travel in one direction isn't exactly useful.
 
2012-11-23 01:34:07 AM
Wow. So it's a combination hydrofoil catamaran then?
 
2012-11-23 01:48:48 AM

Watching_Epoxy_Cure: Wow. So it's a combination hydrofoil catamaran then?


It was never going to be a monohull. They have a theoretical hull speed and you can never best that.
 
2012-11-23 02:48:08 AM
 
2012-11-23 02:55:53 AM
On a science level.. *thumbs up*

On a practical level.. Not even close.
 
2012-11-23 05:07:53 AM
This is fast. Fast. Whoa, this is fast. Ok, this is really fast. This is fast. This is fast.
 
2012-11-23 07:16:13 AM
I'll just take this opportunity to say that I think it's extremely stupid anyone is still using the anachronistic term "knots". Add "nautical mile" to that as well. Just switch marine measurements to kilometers and kilometers per hour and be done with it.
 
2012-11-23 07:34:19 AM

jvl: It's a cute trick to design a sailboat like this which doesn't tip over in the wind. But a boat that can only travel in one direction isn't exactly useful.


THis. The record should be 'there and back' like the jet cars on Black Rock desert do.

And it isn't just 'one direction' - it's a very small window out of the 360 degrees. This design is optimized for a tiny window in apparent wind angle. They set the course based on the wind direction in the bay.

It's still pretty effing cool, though.
 
2012-11-23 07:47:32 AM

DeathByGeekSquad: This is fast. Fast. Whoa, this is fast. Ok, this is really fast. This is fast. This is fast.


i280.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-23 07:51:44 AM
Sweet, I wants me one of those. How much?
 
2012-11-23 08:29:13 AM

Phil Moskowitz: Watching_Epoxy_Cure: Wow. So it's a combination hydrofoil catamaran then?

It was never going to be a monohull. They have a theoretical hull speed and you can never best that.


There's nothing that says you can't go faster than hull speed. It's not a brick wall.
 
2012-11-23 08:31:48 AM

taurusowner: I'll just take this opportunity to say that I think it's extremely stupid anyone is still using the anachronistic term "knots". Add "nautical mile" to that as well. Just switch marine measurements to kilometers and kilometers per hour and be done with it.


+1.

It's still in use in aviation as well.
 
2012-11-23 09:05:27 AM
It's just a DN Iceboat retooled to skim less solid water. Eh. Next.

www.kospictures.com
 
2012-11-23 09:06:34 AM

fatbear: taurusowner: I'll just take this opportunity to say that I think it's extremely stupid anyone is still using the anachronistic term "knots". Add "nautical mile" to that as well. Just switch marine measurements to kilometers and kilometers per hour and be done with it.

+1.

It's still in use in aviation as well.


This. And it works better than statute miles when thought of in a global sense as every minute of arc along a meridian is a nautical mile. Also easier to do quick mental math with as it's roughly 6000'. Statute miles, actually, quite suck.
 
2012-11-23 09:12:12 AM

fatbear: Phil Moskowitz: Watching_Epoxy_Cure: Wow. So it's a combination hydrofoil catamaran then?

It was never going to be a monohull. They have a theoretical hull speed and you can never best that.

There's nothing that says you can't go faster than hull speed. It's not a brick wall.


That, and the fact that nobody has made full-displacement yachts since the eighties. Hell, under the right conditions, I've had the 'Io' on a plane and it's just a big, fat Winnebago on the water. It does have a 90's hull design though: flat bottom, fin keel, wide ass and a "sugar scoop" transom.
 
2012-11-23 10:04:12 AM

Charlie Freak: fatbear: taurusowner: I'll just take this opportunity to say that I think it's extremely stupid anyone is still using the anachronistic term "knots". Add "nautical mile" to that as well. Just switch marine measurements to kilometers and kilometers per hour and be done with it.

+1.

It's still in use in aviation as well.

This. And it works better than statute miles when thought of in a global sense as every minute of arc along a meridian is a nautical mile. Also easier to do quick mental math with as it's roughly 6000'. Statute miles, actually, quite suck.


And a kilometer is exactly 1000 meters. Your point?
 
2012-11-23 10:08:48 AM

Tony_Pepperoni: [i.imgur.com image 225x126]


What's the full clip of that? That looks painfully scary.
 
2012-11-23 10:10:41 AM
Nautical mile is all about being able to read a map.
Most nautical charts are constructed on the Mercator projection whose scale varies by approximately a factor of six from the equator to 80° north or south latitude. It is, therefore, impossible to show a single linear scale for use on charts on scales smaller than about 1/80,000.[2] The nautical mile circumvents this problem by being equal to a minute of latitude on a chart, which allows any distance measured with a chart divider to be simply converted using the chart's latitude scale.
I'm guessing none of you who want to get rid of the knot actually, you know, ever use it in daily life.
 
2012-11-23 10:16:24 AM
awesome
 
2012-11-23 10:18:29 AM

taurusowner: I'll just take this opportunity to say that I think it's extremely stupid anyone is still using the anachronistic term "knots". Add "nautical mile" to that as well. Just switch marine measurements to kilometers and kilometers per hour and be done with it.


Nautical miles aren't anachronistic. They're derived in a similar way to the meter in that the nautical mile's length is a function of the distance from the equator to the poles. Meters are 1/10,000 of that distance, nautical miles are one minute of longitude, of which there are 60 per degree. Because it's defined by the terrestrial grid system (which is in turn related to our measurement of time), it's very useful as a measurement on maps and long range navigation.

The origin of "knots" is amusingly literal and definitely anachronistic but it just the name for a rate - nautical miles per hour.
 
2012-11-23 10:25:49 AM
content.internetvideoarchive.com
 
2012-11-23 10:29:12 AM

Charlie Freak: fatbear: taurusowner: I'll just take this opportunity to say that I think it's extremely stupid anyone is still using the anachronistic term "knots". Add "nautical mile" to that as well. Just switch marine measurements to kilometers and kilometers per hour and be done with it.

+1.

It's still in use in aviation as well.

This. And it works better than statute miles when thought of in a global sense as every minute of arc along a meridian is a nautical mile. Also easier to do quick mental math with as it's roughly 6000'. Statute miles, actually, quite suck.


Both suck. Gimmee meters.
 
2012-11-23 10:29:51 AM

AgentPothead:
I'm guessing none of you who want to get rid of the knot actually, you know, ever use it in daily life.


You guess wrong.
 
2012-11-23 10:46:38 AM
I'm with costermonger and Agent Pothead. If you travel for 10 hours at 15 knots in a certain direction, it's pretty simple to plot your position on the chart. To follow a great circle you need to change course at set intervals, so knowing where you're at is kind of important.

You could argue that with GPS all this is irrelevant, but on the other hand SHUT UP!
 
2012-11-23 11:00:18 AM

fatbear: Charlie Freak: fatbear: taurusowner: I'll just take this opportunity to say that I think it's extremely stupid anyone is still using the anachronistic term "knots". Add "nautical mile" to that as well. Just switch marine measurements to kilometers and kilometers per hour and be done with it.

+1.

It's still in use in aviation as well.

This. And it works better than statute miles when thought of in a global sense as every minute of arc along a meridian is a nautical mile. Also easier to do quick mental math with as it's roughly 6000'. Statute miles, actually, quite suck.

Both suck. Gimmee meters.


when making calculations based on stellar coordinates and time, nautical miles is the first, easiest, and fastest result that comes out of the calculation. hell, if you're good you can spit the nautical miles numbers out doing all the math purely in your head(give or take a few). heck, with a reliable watch, you could navigate anywhere in the world with an error of a few miles without any electricity.

of course, stellar navigation is swiftly becoming a lost art practiced by the curious(briefly), the anachronistic, and the militaries of the world.

however you can have my knots when you can pry them out of my cold, dead hands.


also, christ that was a fast run. i remember back in high school having a hobie up around 40 knots with everyone but me on one pontoon screaming and clinging for dear life(i was on the helm trying to either kill everyone or keep them alive, depending on who you ask). up till we hit the 1' wave that pitchpoled the cat and threw us all off.

everyone else got dunked. i got launched like a very awkward stone out of a catapault. according to those on shore i skipped off the water at least three times before an extremely spectacular splash.
 
2012-11-23 11:03:58 AM
I'm still not clear on how you get a boat to travel twice the speed of the wind.
 
2012-11-23 11:06:53 AM

PanicMan: I'm still not clear on how you get a boat to travel twice the speed of the wind.


You might like to look up the term 'apparent wind' on Wiki. The article is pretty good.
 
2012-11-23 11:15:59 AM

Tillmaster: PanicMan: I'm still not clear on how you get a boat to travel twice the speed of the wind.

You might like to look up the term 'apparent wind' on Wiki. The article is pretty good.


this. the physics of sailing are actually really fascinating.
 
2012-11-23 11:20:59 AM

buttery_shame_cave:
also, christ that was a fast run. i remember back in high school having a hobie up around 40 knots with everyone but me on one pontoon screaming and clinging for dear life(i was on the helm trying to either kill everyone or keep them alive, depending on who you ask). up till we hit the 1' wave that pitchpoled the cat and threw us all off.

everyone else got dunked. i got launched like a very awkward stone out of a catapault. according to those on shore i skipped off the water at least three times before an extremely spectacular splash.


Ummm...NO. Nope, not buying it, bullshiat, horse hockey, BS, your memory sucks, etc.

Hitting the water at 40 knots would break many of the people on your boat, as well as your boat itself.

That, plus Hobies haven't been clocked much over 20 knots.
 
2012-11-23 11:28:24 AM

fatbear: Ummm...NO. Nope, not buying it, bullshiat, horse hockey, BS, your memory sucks, etc.


He once caught a fish this big, too.
 
2012-11-23 12:05:11 PM

PanicMan: I'm still not clear on how you get a boat to travel twice the speed of the wind.


If the wind is coming directly from behind you, then the faster you go, the less force the sails generate, because your own forward movement counteracts the movement of the wind. But, if the wind is coming from the side, then the force generated by your sails is more or less the same, regardless of how fast you're travelling because you're always travelling more or less parallel to the wind (ok, this isn't strictly true, but it's a close enough approximation), so your speed is essentially limited by the friction generated by your hull.
 
2012-11-23 12:57:59 PM

Tony_Pepperoni: [i.imgur.com image 225x126]


Where does that come from?
 
2012-11-23 01:41:49 PM
But a boat that can only travel in one direction isn't exactly useful.

The boat did travel in more than one direction; the captain turned his vessel onto the measured 500 Meter course to set the record. It would be a biatch to try and tack that thing, though. It would probably end up splattered all over the water, sort of like the Oracle America's Cup catamaran did recently.
 
2012-11-23 01:59:07 PM

Flab: Charlie Freak: fatbear: taurusowner: I'll just take this opportunity to say that I think it's extremely stupid anyone is still using the anachronistic term "knots". Add "nautical mile" to that as well. Just switch marine measurements to kilometers and kilometers per hour and be done with it.

+1.

It's still in use in aviation as well.

This. And it works better than statute miles when thought of in a global sense as every minute of arc along a meridian is a nautical mile. Also easier to do quick mental math with as it's roughly 6000'. Statute miles, actually, quite suck.

And a kilometer is exactly 1000 meters. Your point?


Someone else said it, but I'll add my voice to the chorus. The important part is not the number of feet, but that it's a minute of arc. When you're travelling on the earth, it makes sense to have a unit that's base on the total distance around, since that makes navigation without fancy instruments (which anyone going out of site of land should know how to do, just in case) much easier. You can argue that we ought to split up the earth by powers of 10, but I don't see that change going so well.
 
2012-11-23 02:11:13 PM

I May Be Crazy But...:

Someone else said it, but I'll add my voice to the chorus. The important part is not the number of feet, but that it's a minute of arc. When you're travelling on the earth, it makes sense to have a unit that's base on the total distance around, since that makes navigation without fancy instruments (which anyone going out of site of land should know how to do, just in case) much easier. You can argue that we ought to split up the earth by powers of 10, but I don't see that change going so well.


Only when you're going north-south. It's great for the Bermuda-BVI run. If you're going from the US to Europe or back, knowing that a nm is exactly one minute of longitude is about as useful as memorizing all the presidents of France.
 
2012-11-23 02:12:03 PM

shanteyman:

The boat did travel in more than one direction; the captain turned his vessel onto the measured 500 Meter course to set the record.


It can't travel in the opposite direction. Not useful.
 
2012-11-23 02:28:01 PM

fatbear: I May Be Crazy But...:

Someone else said it, but I'll add my voice to the chorus. The important part is not the number of feet, but that it's a minute of arc. When you're travelling on the earth, it makes sense to have a unit that's base on the total distance around, since that makes navigation without fancy instruments (which anyone going out of site of land should know how to do, just in case) much easier. You can argue that we ought to split up the earth by powers of 10, but I don't see that change going so well.

Only when you're going north-south. It's great for the Bermuda-BVI run. If you're going from the US to Europe or back, knowing that a nm is exactly one minute of longitude is about as useful as memorizing all the presidents of France.


I'd claim that being able to tell how far N-S you are is pretty useful even when you're travelling East or West. It's really hard to know exactly what direction you're going (as opposed to facing, since currents and winds can change it) and if I want to be more sure to hit England vs Spain, I'd like to know that sore of information.
 
2012-11-23 02:32:29 PM

fatbear: Only when you're going north-south. It's great for the Bermuda-BVI run. If you're going from the US to Europe or back, knowing that a nm is exactly one minute of longitude latitude [ftfy] is about as useful as memorizing all the presidents of France.


Well, the other reason that relationship is useful is that every north/south running line on a map created with the geographic coordinate system is a nautical mile scale bar.

Another fun one that has applications in aeronautical/nautical navigation because of the nautical mile's relationship to angular distance: at a distance of 60NM, 1 degree of angular distance is 1 nautical mile. Ie, if you're to the right of track by 1 nautical mile when you've got 30 miles to go, you need to adjust your track 2 degrees to the left.

I'm a Canadian in my late 20s.. I think in metric. No aversion to kilometers, but the nautical mile is superior for the areas where it gets used.
 
2012-11-23 02:41:15 PM

Tillmaster: Tony_Pepperoni: [i.imgur.com image 225x126]

Where does that come from?


Video here.
 
2012-11-23 03:20:53 PM

b-ham: Tillmaster: Tony_Pepperoni: [i.imgur.com image 225x126]

Where does that come from?

Video here.


I love how the guy falls stiff like a plank and his sunglasses go bouncing around the boat.
 
2012-11-23 03:50:08 PM

I May Be Crazy But...: if I want to be more sure to hit England vs Spain, I'd like to know that sore of information.


costermonger: the nautical mile is superior for the areas where it gets used.


Couldn't agree more. For determining if you're going to hit England or Spain when sailing in the 18th century, the nautical mile requires fewer strokes of the quill.

For everything else, I'll take my meters. And if you're trying to figure out if that land is England vs Spain instead of Penzance vs Milford haven, you're fired as my navigator. Even if it is 1761.
 
2012-11-23 03:55:29 PM

fatbear: For everything else, I'll take my meters.


So there's easy to remember, do-it-in-your-head course correction calculations with degrees and meters too? Cool!
 
2012-11-23 04:45:44 PM

costermonger: fatbear: For everything else, I'll take my meters.

So there's easy to remember, do-it-in-your-head course correction calculations with degrees and meters too? Cool!


Yep. And you provided it.

if you're to the right of track by 1 nautical mile when you've got 30 miles to go, you need to adjust your track 2 degrees to the left
if you're to the right of track by 1000 meters when you've got 30 kilometers to go, you need to adjust your track 2 degrees to the left
if you're to the right of track by 1 furlong when you've got 30 furlongs to go, you need to adjust your track 2 degrees to the left
if you're to the right of track by 1 parsec when you've got 30 parsecs to go, you need to adjust your track 2 degrees to the left
if you're to the right of track by 1 cubit when you've got 30 cubits to go, you need to adjust your track 2 degrees to the left

Corrected sentence:
Another fun trick that works because angular distance is non-dimensional: at a distance of 57.3 units, 1 degree of angular distance is 1 unit. i.e., if you're to the right of track by 1 unit when you've got 28.6 units to go, you need to adjust your track 2 degrees to the left.

It works because the sine of 1 degree is almost 1/60th and 60 is an easy number for use to use when we do math in our head - it's evenly divisible by 1,2,3,4,5 and 6.

It has nothing to do with any division of the earth's circumference into 21,600 units.
 
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