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(LA Times)   Record Store Day organizers are hoping that many new rare vinyl releases will bring customers to record stores on Black Friday, just as soon as people finish shopping at the Buggy Whip stores   (latimes.com) divider line 90
    More: Amusing, Record Store Day, Biz Markie, Jeff Buckley, Mark Mothersbaugh, Wii U, Captain Beefheart, Alexandre Desplat, Leonard Cohen  
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903 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 22 Nov 2012 at 9:13 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-22 09:19:07 AM
The buggy whip stores shoukd be doing bang-up this year thanks to multiple shades of gray.

/better to give than receive
//boobies
 
2012-11-22 09:19:50 AM
Vinyl is infinitely superior than CDs. The human ear wasn't meant to hear music in such clinical clarity. It needs pops and crackles.

Link
 
2012-11-22 09:21:30 AM
I'm installing a WATS line that day.
 
2012-11-22 09:21:49 AM
No ELO no care.
 
2012-11-22 09:29:11 AM
I love listening to something for a couple minutes and then getting up and having to flip it over. I buy records just for that. I don't even listen to them. I just put it on my table and look at it until I feel like flipping it over. Then I stare at it some more.
 
2012-11-22 09:33:15 AM
Sorry, I'll be going to the 8 track emporium and then the hula hoop outlet store. Hope the crowds aren't too rowdy.
 
2012-11-22 09:38:45 AM

nursedude: Sorry, I'll be going to the 8 track emporium and then the hula hoop outlet store. Hope the crowds aren't too rowdy.


Sure, if you want crap.

Everyone knows the Edison wax cylinder store is where you get real music at.
 
2012-11-22 09:47:31 AM
The stores need more bike racks for the fixies that the hipsters will be riding to get there....

/has about 3k albums
 
2012-11-22 09:55:19 AM
Cool! I'll need to grab the yellow pages to find the nearest one.
 
2012-11-22 10:01:41 AM
img.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-22 10:02:15 AM
I'm ready!

www.granitecitygossip.com

/Vinyl is the superior medium if you want to really hear the music
//Obviously the least convenient
///I still buy vinyl on occasion
 
2012-11-22 10:28:32 AM
Vinyl does actually sound better with a really good system.

It is not, however portable, convenient or inexpensive and you can't make endless "free" copies and hand them out like m&ms on Halloween.

So, yeah, people don't much care about it anymore.

It is, however, still a very useful format for music, if not one for saying "OMG, this totally should be my ringtone!" It's simply moved upscale like anything that focuses on quality rather than convenience. Vinyl is largely for people with 34,000.00 stereo systems in acoustically neutral rooms who have the kind of money for that stuff. And, yeah, that's fine.
 
2012-11-22 10:32:19 AM

jj325: I'm ready!

[www.granitecitygossip.com image 358x609]

/Vinyl is the superior medium if you want to really hear the music
//Obviously the least convenient
///I still buy vinyl on occasion


Actually, doesn't Vinyl kind of obscure the music since you're hearing the white noise created by the equipment and the stylus cutting into the vinyl interfering with the playback?

Digital really is cleaner, and a more accurate representation of music than vinyl.
 
2012-11-22 10:33:19 AM
lol, tangible media. How quaint.
 
2012-11-22 10:42:27 AM

nekom: lol, tangible media. How quaint.


Yeah, I mean who wants to cop to "z0mg teh oldz0rs!1" when it's easier to act like the tail wagging the dog is the One True Way™ : )

Buy what you like and why, folks. But if you have to sit and argue two decimal places of noise floor per medium like somebody just peed on your shoe, you probably don't give a sh*t about music anyhoo. And, yeah, that's... nice.
 
kab
2012-11-22 10:46:01 AM
lol u gaiz are old! all mah music is in the clowd who needs records anyhow lol
 
2012-11-22 11:02:23 AM

SockMonkeyHolocaust: I love listening to something for a couple minutes and then getting up and having to flip it over. I buy records just for that. I don't even listen to them. I just put it on my table and look at it until I feel like flipping it over. Then I stare at it some more.


I know you're joking, but I've heard arguments that mirrored this almost exactly. I mean, arguing over the soundquality of vinyl vs. digital is one thing, but the "I just like the ritual that comes from listening to vinyl" is one of the saddest arguments I've ever read.
 
2012-11-22 11:02:50 AM

bunner: nekom: lol, tangible media. How quaint.

Yeah, I mean who wants to cop to "z0mg teh oldz0rs!1" when it's easier to act like the tail wagging the dog is the One True Way™ : )

Buy what you like and why, folks. But if you have to sit and argue two decimal places of noise floor per medium like somebody just peed on your shoe, you probably don't give a sh*t about music anyhoo. And, yeah, that's... nice.


It's been my experience that "audiophiles" just listen to music so that they can tell you what's wrong with the stereo playing it.
 
2012-11-22 11:09:36 AM
I am presently mixing a demo, and two releases for a band and a solo artist from Seattle, and it has taken digital up until now to come with the horsepower to come anywhere near an analogue workflow as far as recording and production techniques. And the funny thing is, every time I turn around, somebody is trying to sell me some algorithmically gymnastic simulacrum of something they swear sounds JUST LIKE all the sh*t I was told to throw away. You know what else sounds like tape? And, that's fine. The digitzation music wasn't about music. It was about squeezing it into a cheaper, more portable and convenient format. And it seems to have worked. But nobody walks around selling 900.00 plug-ins that sound "just like digital!" : )
 
2012-11-22 11:11:21 AM

jake_lex: It's been my experience that "audiophiles" just listen to music so that they can tell you what's wrong with the stereo playing it.


There's some validity in that, much like there's some validity to the argument that people with brown skin sure do end up on the wrong side of the law, a lot, but it's not a one size fits all. That blanket never really covers everything.
 
2012-11-22 11:12:23 AM
I miss the warmth of analog video
 
2012-11-22 11:18:14 AM

Wasilla Hillbilly: I miss the warmth of analog video


Yeah, and the pops and crackles from when the tape got eaten by the VCR and you had to take it apart and try to smooth out the tape...

*sigh*

The good old days.
 
2012-11-22 11:25:43 AM

jake_lex: It's been my experience that "audiophiles" just listen to music so that they can tell you what's wrong with the stereo playing it.


There is a saying : People listen to music, audiophiles listen to the stereo.
 
2012-11-22 11:28:31 AM
Thread was over in one.

/I spend a lot of money at the buggy whip store, thank you very much.
 
2012-11-22 11:31:10 AM
The point of high fidelity is that you hear exactly what the mastering engineer signed off on. Period. Nothing more or less. True to the source. And with a sh*tty system in a sh*tty room, that's damn near impossible. And that's why, audiophile or not, you're sort of STUCK listening to the stereo. And for all of the utter malarkey voodoo that a lot of audiophiles subscribe to, the whole movement has managed to make listening to musical playback a little more pleasurable for everybody. Do you need a monster system with impeccable components in a completely inert room? No. Does music sound "just as good" on your iPhone speaker? No. It's about the music. Whatever makes the music work for you, go and buy that sh*t. And cast not great snark at those who buyeth otherwise.
 
2012-11-22 11:36:22 AM

FirstNationalBastard: Wasilla Hillbilly: I miss the warmth of analog video

Yeah, and the pops and crackles from when the tape got eaten by the VCR and you had to take it apart and try to smooth out the tape...

*sigh*

The good old days.


Great now I really do miss the good old days. My cassette tapes went through much abuse and repair. Oohh..remember when people would get pissed and throw their 8-track out the window leaving long streams of black tape along the roadside?

Farking kids and their general disrespect of lawns...
 
2012-11-22 12:01:37 PM
I just keep an 8 member band chained up in the basement. No recording matches live.
 
2012-11-22 12:11:21 PM

FeedTheCollapse: I know you're joking, but I've heard arguments that mirrored this almost exactly. I mean, arguing over the soundquality of vinyl vs. digital is one thing, but the "I just like the ritual that comes from listening to vinyl" is one of the saddest arguments I've ever read.


I see it a lot with ebooks vs paper books. "I like the smell of a paper book". Dude, that's mold and mildew.
 
2012-11-22 12:12:46 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: Vinyl is infinitely superior than CDs. The human ear wasn't meant to hear music in such clinical clarity. It needs pops and crackles.

Link


I don't listen to compact disques. Note that I didn't call them "CDs". CD is a nickname and nicknames are for friends and compact disques are NO FRIENDS OF MINE.

That said, I got Aeroplane Over The Sea on vinyl for my birthday and it's f--king fantastic. Other than that I'll buy one or two new a year (almost entirely local artists or indie folks who are doing a vinyl only release), I'll maybe get one as a present, and I'll pick up free/cheap ones for the heck of it and cause old school Motown vinyl that cost me a dime gives a dinner party way better ambiance than the iPod.

/I sound hipster
//whatever
 
2012-11-22 12:20:30 PM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: old school Motown vinyl that cost me a dime gives a dinner party way better ambiance than the iPod.


Love him or hate him for his business practices, Berry Gordy invented the modern day indie label template. Kept it in house, had staff writers, musicians, engineers, and did weekly focus group meetings where the song had to pass the sammich test. And he berthed life into the top 40 and brought more musical diversity to the public and radio than ANYbody else EVER did. Loves me some Motown / Tamla / Gordy / Stax / Volt. That's where I grew up. And it's still as good as it ever was because because can do that. Ask Beethoven.
 
2012-11-22 12:26:19 PM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: ... old school Motown vinyl that cost me a dime gives a dinner party way better ambiance than the iPod.
\


Yeah, but Berry Gordy mixed the Motown songs specifically so they would sound great on the shiatty, tinny transistor radio and car stereo speakers of the time.

So, they would still sound great on an iPod today, since those are shiatty, tinny little headphones.
 
2012-11-22 12:33:44 PM

FirstNationalBastard: StreetlightInTheGhetto: ... old school Motown vinyl that cost me a dime gives a dinner party way better ambiance than the iPod.
\

Yeah, but Berry Gordy mixed the Motown songs specifically so they would sound great on the shiatty, tinny transistor radio and car stereo speakers of the time.

So, they would still sound great on an iPod today, since those are shiatty, tinny little headphones.


Kinda.

He did understand that his stuff had to stand out.

He was sort of the advent of the loudness wars. Louder, more compressed, focused on midrange bandwidth. Some of those tracks are compressed well beyond saturation and THAT is something you can do with tape that you can't do with a .wav file. 0 dBFS is the devil's ceiling. And people are STILL flogging an endless array of plug-ins that are supposed to emulate that.

He didn't mix much of anything, but he did stand over his engineers telling them what to do until the song in his head came out of the speakers, and that's what a producer does.
 
2012-11-22 12:51:42 PM

FirstNationalBastard: So, they would still sound great on an iPod today, since those are shiatty, tinny little headphones.


I gave a colleague my Sennheisers to listen to as he still had the white iPod ones. 10 minutes later, he ordered a pair similar to mine. And these weren't some fancy pants audiophile shiat. You get cx200 headphones for about £15-20.
 
2012-11-22 01:19:38 PM
The best way for artists to release music going forward IMO, is high quality vinyl records with high quality art/packaging, something that will justify the space it takes up, and include a download link for the mp3s with purchase. most independent musicians can sell a decent LP package for 10-15 bucks and still make money with runs of a few hundred copies. 7-inches and 45s should cost 5-10 bucks. CDs can be more cheap to produce, but they're also.,.cheaper.
 
2012-11-22 01:20:46 PM

gnarlywizzard: The best way for artists to release music going forward IMO, is high quality vinyl records with high quality art/packaging, something that will justify the space it takes up, and include a download link for the mp3s with purchase. most independent musicians can sell a decent LP package for 10-15 bucks and still make money with runs of a few hundred copies. 7-inches and 45s should cost 5-10 bucks. CDs can be more cheap to produce, but they're also.,.cheaper.


...with superior sound, of course.

But, hey, you don't have anything to separate out the seeds and stems on.
 
2012-11-22 01:32:00 PM

FirstNationalBastard: gnarlywizzard: The best way for artists to release music going forward IMO, is high quality vinyl records with high quality art/packaging, something that will justify the space it takes up, and include a download link for the mp3s with purchase. most independent musicians can sell a decent LP package for 10-15 bucks and still make money with runs of a few hundred copies. 7-inches and 45s should cost 5-10 bucks. CDs can be more cheap to produce, but they're also.,.cheaper.

...with superior sound, of course.

But, hey, you don't have anything to separate out the seeds and stems on.


mp3s usually have CD quality sound, and ipod docks on stereos and in cars makes CDs redundant for the most part these days. the physical vinyl copy might sound a little worse but the point is for it to be a hip and collectible art object.
 
2012-11-22 01:46:59 PM

FirstNationalBastard: StreetlightInTheGhetto: ... old school Motown vinyl that cost me a dime gives a dinner party way better ambiance than the iPod.
\

Yeah, but Berry Gordy mixed the Motown songs specifically so they would sound great on the shiatty, tinny transistor radio and car stereo speakers of the time.

So, they would still sound great on an iPod today, since those are shiatty, tinny little headphones.


Motown on vinyl for entertaining people > iPod connected to our fairly respectable speakers
 
2012-11-22 02:22:49 PM
Comparing the recordings of today that are usually recorded and mixed with the CD or MP3 in mind is apples an oranges to the recordings made, I would say until the mid 80s or so. Maybe earlier. The creep of digital prevents a real demarcation.

I don't think the technical aspects of the recording method is the variable in the recording quality that people would suggest. Old analog multitrack was an ordeal and expensive and part "magic". The people involved by and large were more skilled as a necessity. Now, digital recorders, mixing software and all the rest is vastly cheaper and easier to use on a basic level, the barriers to entry to that field are almost nonexistent.

Not to say that there aren't great recordings out there. It is just that there are a lot more "fry cooks" out there when there was a time that the recordings we were used to, were made by "Chefs"...
 
2012-11-22 02:26:38 PM
Need to get the White Stripes stuff.
 
2012-11-22 02:48:42 PM
I love my vinyl. Your mileage may vary.
 
2012-11-22 03:02:56 PM

jake_lex: It's been my experience that "audiophiles" just listen to music so that they can tell you what's wrong with the stereo playing it.

 

There's a fine line between funny and insightful sometimes.
 
2012-11-22 03:04:05 PM
images.hhv.de

I bought this. Listened to it once, the novelty wore off. But at least they included a DVD, MP3 disc of the songs, and a T shirt
 
2012-11-22 03:13:31 PM
flickfeast.co.uk
 
kab
2012-11-22 04:19:40 PM

gnarlywizzard: mp3s usually have CD quality sound


Well.. no. They actually don't.
 
2012-11-22 05:51:23 PM

Jedekai: [flickfeast.co.uk image 320x238]


That took faaaaaaaaaaaar too long....

/say no more, mon amor...
 
2012-11-22 06:02:58 PM

swaxhog: FeedTheCollapse: I know you're joking, but I've heard arguments that mirrored this almost exactly. I mean, arguing over the soundquality of vinyl vs. digital is one thing, but the "I just like the ritual that comes from listening to vinyl" is one of the saddest arguments I've ever read.

I see it a lot with ebooks vs paper books. "I like the smell of a paper book". Dude, that's mold and mildew.


yeah, that's another one that perplexes me. I can udnerstand preferring a physical product to a digital product, but any arguments involving secondary characteristics or rituals in using the mediums just feel like a lot of bending-over-backwards defenses that come off more as stubbornness.
 
2012-11-22 07:18:21 PM

bunner: The point of high fidelity is that you hear exactly what the mastering engineer signed off on. Period. Nothing more or less. True to the source. And with a sh*tty system in a sh*tty room, that's damn near impossible. And that's why, audiophile or not, you're sort of STUCK listening to the stereo. And for all of the utter malarkey voodoo that a lot of audiophiles subscribe to, the whole movement has managed to make listening to musical playback a little more pleasurable for everybody. Do you need a monster system with impeccable components in a completely inert room? No. Does music sound "just as good" on your iPhone speaker? No. It's about the music. Whatever makes the music work for you, go and buy that sh*t. And cast not great snark at those who buyeth otherwise.


It will sound quite good if you plug some decent quality ear plugs into your iPhone though - not the crappy ear plugs that came with the phone.

Perhaps it's not true hi-fi because of the lossy compression used on the digital files from iTunes, but very few people would notice a difference.
 
2012-11-22 07:24:39 PM

kg2095: Perhaps it's not true hi-fi because of the lossy compression used on the digital files from iTunes, but very few people would notice a difference.


Probably not. but they should be very grateful that the recording industry still uses very high end gear, monitors, rooms and methods to produce the records they love so much on .mp3 or AIFF. Because if they ever start making records the same way people listen to them, it's gonna sound like a hippopliptimoose sh*tting gravel.
 
2012-11-22 09:40:00 PM
Cons: records develop hiss, crackles, pops, and skips.
pros: cds only develop one of these things.


I have ONE example where the vinyl sound quality is better than the cd.
CD: Communique by Dire Straits. Purchased in 1992. Most likely an 1980's cd version.
LP: Heavy gram vinyl re-issue. (note: just a re-issue, not a remaster).

The cd sounds like a typical 80's cd: quiet, slightly flat, slightly hissy. (compare to "Love Over Gold" or "Local Hero" soundtrack, which was recorded/engineered/mixed with Digital Equipment. Albeit early 80's digital equipment. They still sound crystal clear and great today)

Meanwhile the vinyl re-issue has a broad, louder, more full sound.
 
2012-11-22 10:08:16 PM
I might add that those who cheer digital and wax dismissively about everything else, yet bemoan the dearth of new, exciting independent artists - try and imagine the motivations one might have to spend months of time and the fees inherent in using a proper studio and talented engineers to produce something that - upon it's first few moments of release into the wild, will be run through some douchesocket's 64 kb .mp3 factory and handed out of free like so many refrigerator magnets at a political rally. Double edged sword, kids.
 
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