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(Washington Post)   L'affaire Petraeus lacks every element of the definition   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 37
    More: Obvious, Petraeus, Dana Milbank, Gary Condit, David Vitter, Ken Starr, cybersex, hush money, John Ensign  
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2004 clicks; posted to Politics » on 21 Nov 2012 at 8:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-21 08:37:46 AM
Rational thinking has no place in the Republican world. This "scandal" was always about covering up the Benghazi attack. His resignation was supposedly to keep him from testifying. Paranoia is the defining trait of the Republican party.
 
2012-11-21 08:38:09 AM
Except of course, for the whole cheating on the wife bit.
 
2012-11-21 08:48:51 AM

DubyaHater: Rational thinking has no place in the Republican world. This "scandal" was always about covering up the Benghazi attack. His resignation was supposedly to keep him from testifying. Paranoia is the defining trait of the Republican party.


Ignorance is the defining trait of the Republican Party. Paranoia is just one of the many symptoms.
 
2012-11-21 08:48:57 AM
It lacks Petraeus?
 
2012-11-21 08:49:17 AM

Karac: Except of course, for the whole cheating on the wife bit.


Indeed.

In fact, it's hard to understand what the point of Milbank's article is? Is he merely trying to salvage some vestigial hero worship?
 
2012-11-21 08:50:32 AM
In the world of espionage a potential for compromise is nearly as bad as actual compromise, Petraeus understands that better than anyone.

The article is kind of an apple to oranges comparison, in that the author largely uses elected officials in his examples - Petraeus was appointed to this position.

So scandal? Not really, no.

How many would still have faith in him, considering he can't even keep a little schtupping under wraps?
 
2012-11-21 08:53:54 AM

Karac: Except of course, for the whole cheating on the wife bit.


Plus the whole bit about a high-rank officer putting himself at risk for bribery, and the bit where the mistress had classified information on her home computer. Other than that, I don't see the problem.
 
2012-11-21 08:54:54 AM
And to make the whole thing less scandally, have you seen his wife? Yeeeeccchh
 
2012-11-21 08:55:15 AM

Mad Tea Party: Plus the whole bit about a high-rank officer putting himself at risk for bribery, and the bit where the mistress had classified information on her home computer. Other than that, I don't see the problem.


this
 
2012-11-21 08:57:06 AM
I've always wondered why people were surprised about a military man getting a little on the side.
 
2012-11-21 08:58:56 AM

Mad Tea Party: Karac: Except of course, for the whole cheating on the wife bit.

Plus the whole bit about a high-rank officer putting himself at risk for bribery yes, I said bribery...because people will pay him to talk dirty, maybe?, and the bit where the mistress with a security clearance had classified information on her home computer. Other than that, I don't see the problem much different than any other sordid affair in military circles.


FTFY
 
2012-11-21 09:01:23 AM

wejash: Mad Tea Party: Karac: Except of course, for the whole cheating on the wife bit.

Plus the whole bit about a high-rank officer putting himself at risk for bribery yes, I said bribery...because people will pay him to talk dirty, maybe?, and the bit where the mistress with a security clearance had classified information on her home computer. Other than that, I don't see the problem much different than any other sordid affair in military circles.

FTFY


I realize you're trolling, but for the sake of everyone else reading, even if you have the proper clearance, putting classified stuff on your home pc is a big no-no.
 
2012-11-21 09:03:03 AM
Hello, my name is Larry. Larry L'affaire.
 
2012-11-21 09:03:18 AM
fark you, WashingtonPost.com. shiatty porn sites have less obtrusive advertising.
 
2012-11-21 09:07:39 AM

Skleenar: In fact, it's hard to understand what the point of Milbank's article is?


I think his point is that there's a distinction between an affair and a scandal. While this is the first, it isn't the second.

That seems to be a pretty fine point, to me.
 
2012-11-21 09:08:03 AM
The article states: "Sic transit gloria mundi = All glory is fleeting."
Actual literal translation is "Gloria got sick on the bus Monday".

/had 4 years of Latin
 
2012-11-21 09:10:23 AM

wejash: Mad Tea Party: Karac: Except of course, for the whole cheating on the wife bit.

Plus the whole bit about a high-rank officer putting himself at risk for bribery yes, I said bribery...because people will pay him to talk dirty, maybe?, and the bit where the mistress with a security clearance had classified information on her home computer. Other than that, I don't see the problem much different than any other sordid affair in military circles.


OK, so maybe Mad Tea Party should have used the word extortion instead of bribery.
And if you didn't know, having classified information on a home computer is a serious security breach.
Not to mention that sordid affairs in military circles are generally career-enders for officers anyway.
 
2012-11-21 09:13:06 AM
I thought the author mis-remembered it:
FTA: I wrote, because he "didn't even have to endure, as Roman generals did, the slave holding the crown over his head and whispering in his ear: Sic transit gloria mundi. All glory is fleeting."

Quoting Wikipedia:
Augustus was granted the right to hang the corona civica, the "civic crown" made from oak, above his door and have laurels drape his doorposts.[115] This crown was usually held above the head of a Roman general during a triumph, with the individual holding the crown charged to continually repeat "memento mori", or, "Remember, you are mortal", to the triumphant general.
 
2012-11-21 09:16:58 AM

RubberBandMan: The article states: "Sic transit gloria mundi = All glory is fleeting."
Actual literal translation is "Gloria got sick on the bus Monday".

/had 4 years of Latin


Is there a comment of the year award, because you'd be a nominee.
 
2012-11-21 09:19:03 AM
Good, glad we could clear that up, because my give-a-crap meter bottomed out at least a good 36 hours ago.
 
2012-11-21 09:20:55 AM
i dunno, it seems kinda scandalous that you can get an FBI investigation, complete with sucking up everything you've ever typed and let loose on the intertubes, on the merits of a biatchy email.

yah, the guy put his dick where he shouldn't have, so...yay for that scandal too. but...yah. i'm still arching an eyebrow at what caused this to even be an investigation.
 
2012-11-21 09:23:58 AM

soaboutthat: I've always wondered why people were surprised about a military man getting a little on the side.


Two wives are allowed in the army, but one's too many for me.
 
2012-11-21 09:27:23 AM

spelletrader: How many would still have faith in him, considering he can't even keep a little schtupping under wraps?


He kept his end quiet. It was the fact that he was screwing a crazy person who threatened another woman which was the problem.
 
2012-11-21 09:28:31 AM
Not that anyone cares, but "Sic transit gloria mundi"

...is possibly an adaptation of a phrase in Thomas à Kempis's 1418 work The Imitation of Christ: "O quam cito transit gloria mundi" ("How quickly the glory of the world passes away").

The phrase was used in the ritual of papal coronation ceremonies between 1409, when it was used at the coronation of Alexander V, and 1963. As the newly chosen pope proceeded from the sacristy of St. Peter's Basilica in his sedia gestatoria, the procession stopped three times. On each occasion a papal master of ceremonies would fall to his knees before the pope, holding a silver or brass reed, bearing a tow of smoldering flax. For three times in succession, as the cloth burned away, he would say in a loud and mournful voice, "Sancte Pater, sic transit gloria mundi!" ("Holy Father, so passes worldly glory!") These words, thus addressed to the pope, served as a reminder of the transitory nature of life and earthly honors. The stafflike instrument used in the aforementioned ceremony is known as a "sic transit gloria mundi", named for the master of ceremonies' words.


/from Wikipedia.
//The phrase whispered to Roman generals is "Memento mori" or "Respice post te! Hominem te esse memento! Memento mori!": "Look behind you! Remember that you are but a man! Remember that you'll die!"
 
2012-11-21 09:33:35 AM

RubberBandMan: The article states: "Sic transit gloria mundi = All glory is fleeting."
Actual literal translation is "Gloria got sick on the bus Monday".

/had 4 years of Latin


Awesome.
 
2012-11-21 09:39:38 AM
So it's not a scandal because he had his clothes on in a picture? I mean, I don't really think it's a scandal either, but a lot of the examples the list I also wouldn't consider scandals. But when you've got a puritannical culture, this is the sort of response you get to people in authority having "wrong" sex (wrong by excessively strict standards that is). Petraeus is no worse, but also no better than many people in that article - if they had to "pay the price", so should he.
 
2012-11-21 09:45:02 AM

Bhruic: So it's not a scandal because he had his clothes on in a picture? I mean, I don't really think it's a scandal either, but a lot of the examples the list I also wouldn't consider scandals. But when you've got a puritannical culture, this is the sort of response you get to people in authority having "wrong" sex (wrong by excessively strict standards that is). Petraeus is no worse, but also no better than many people in that article - if they had to "pay the price", so should he.


It is a scandal a sex scandal. Just like Monica Lewinski and Tiger Woods is a scandal. Infidelity is not normally a "scandal" but when you are one of America's most celebrated military figures and head of the most significant intelligence agency in the world, it is a scandal.

/Woods was a scandal based on volume of skanks not the infidelity alone
//Weiner was a scandal because we had pics
 
2012-11-21 09:52:26 AM
I've said all along that the affair revealed more about problems in the system and our processes than anything.

But illegal or not, scandal or not, it probably doesn't serve the country well to have a dishonest guy serving in that role. Especially when the potential for security leaks or vulnerabilities are there.

Frankly I'd be pleased if we focused on this nagging issue of the influence of Military Starfarkers. And what the hell the nipple-less FBI agent was thinking.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-11-21 09:55:40 AM

Karac: Except of course, for the whole cheating on the wife bit.


That's only a scandal when a Democratic President does it.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-11-21 10:02:00 AM
Milbanks must suck at journalist if he doesn't understand why Petraeus offered his resignation or Obama accepted it.

The job requires that you maintain a security clearance, and that requires that you not be vulnerable to blackmail. It has nothing to do with anyones ideas on morality. You can lose a security clearance for financial problems too.
 
2012-11-21 10:11:47 AM
This is a weird assumption in the holier than thou summation FTFA:

If Petraeus is guilty of anything, it's the hubristic belief, endemic in this town, that he was too powerful to get caught. But in this case, what he got "caught" doing is his business and his wife's - not the nation's.

I think anyone, especially anyone in politics, realizes that engaging in a long term affair (or any affair) is a calculated risk especially someone who's job counts on them to accurately assess risk. That's why they used a gmail draft folder for their communications. It likely wasn't hubris that drove him to this, it was likely that he wasn't getting his needs met at home (probably not just sexually) and that he was able to get what he wanted from his mistress. The reward of being with this woman outweighed the risk of getting caught.
 
2012-11-21 10:16:03 AM

Snarfangel: I thought the author mis-remembered it:
FTA: I wrote, because he "didn't even have to endure, as Roman generals did, the slave holding the crown over his head and whispering in his ear: Sic transit gloria mundi. All glory is fleeting."

Quoting Wikipedia:
Augustus was granted the right to hang the corona civica, the "civic crown" made from oak, above his door and have laurels drape his doorposts.[115] This crown was usually held above the head of a Roman general during a triumph, with the individual holding the crown charged to continually repeat "memento mori", or, "Remember, you are mortal", to the triumphant general.


He was able to dispense with that annoyance for two reasons:

1. He was deified (after he died, but he got a lot of privileges in life)
2. He was the absolute military and financial master of the known world. He controlled all but 2 of the legions. He personally bailed the Roman treasury out from his own pocket on 7 different occasions.

It's the golden rule: him what has the gold, makes the rules.

Sic semper tyrannis?
 
2012-11-21 10:21:00 AM

vpb: Milbanks must suck at journalist if he doesn't understand why Petraeus offered his resignation or Obama accepted it.

The job requires that you maintain a security clearance, and that requires that you not be vulnerable to blackmail. It has nothing to do with anyones ideas on morality. You can lose a security clearance for financial problems too.


I would think that the fact that the affair is exposed means that he's no longer vulnerable to said blackmail.

The attempt to make this a scandal, ironically, removes that very argument, since you can't blackmail someone over the threat of revealing what's on the front page of every newspaper in the country.
 
2012-11-21 10:23:52 AM

whistleridge: It's the golden rule: him what has the gold, makes the rules.

Sic semper tyrannis?


farm5.static.flickr.com
 
2012-11-21 11:03:26 AM

whistleridge: Snarfangel: I thought the author mis-remembered it:
FTA: I wrote, because he "didn't even have to endure, as Roman generals did, the slave holding the crown over his head and whispering in his ear: Sic transit gloria mundi. All glory is fleeting."

Quoting Wikipedia:
Augustus was granted the right to hang the corona civica, the "civic crown" made from oak, above his door and have laurels drape his doorposts.[115] This crown was usually held above the head of a Roman general during a triumph, with the individual holding the crown charged to continually repeat "memento mori", or, "Remember, you are mortal", to the triumphant general.

He was able to dispense with that annoyance for two reasons:

1. He was deified (after he died, but he got a lot of privileges in life)
2. He was the absolute military and financial master of the known world. He controlled all but 2 of the legions. He personally bailed the Roman treasury out from his own pocket on 7 different occasions.

It's the golden rule: him what has the gold, makes the rules.

Sic semper tyrannis?


www.craftster.org

You said "Always Faithful Terrible Lizard."
 
2012-11-21 11:15:11 AM

Karac: Except of course, for the whole cheating on the wife bit.


Is that a scandal or a private issue? If I were his wife, I would be hurt and angry. As a member of the public, I feel like it's not my business. Even if you count the potential for blackmail, simply acknowledging that affair happened takes that potential away. And, frankly, I am not scandalized at the idea that a powerful man might have slept with a woman other than his wife. I am not shocked at all at the idea of military personnel having affairs. They are away from their families for long periods of time, and they work under conditions that make seeking sex and creating intense, temporary bonds more likely. And no one can claim that Petraeus was being sloppy. He took a lot more precautions than the average person having an affair takes. His affair wasn't discovered by some cheap private investigator or a reporter sniffing out a scandal. It was discovered by the FBI.

To me, the real scandal is that the FBI got involved in this in the first place. That a socialite had enough power to start an FBI investigation that even the local police would have laughed at is a scandal.
 
2012-11-21 11:20:32 AM

saintstryfe: whistleridge: Snarfangel: I thought the author mis-remembered it:
FTA: I wrote, because he "didn't even have to endure, as Roman generals did, the slave holding the crown over his head and whispering in his ear: Sic transit gloria mundi. All glory is fleeting."

Quoting Wikipedia:
Augustus was granted the right to hang the corona civica, the "civic crown" made from oak, above his door and have laurels drape his doorposts.[115] This crown was usually held above the head of a Roman general during a triumph, with the individual holding the crown charged to continually repeat "memento mori", or, "Remember, you are mortal", to the triumphant general.

He was able to dispense with that annoyance for two reasons:

1. He was deified (after he died, but he got a lot of privileges in life)
2. He was the absolute military and financial master of the known world. He controlled all but 2 of the legions. He personally bailed the Roman treasury out from his own pocket on 7 different occasions.

It's the golden rule: him what has the gold, makes the rules.

Sic semper tyrannis?

[www.craftster.org image 479x360]

You said "Always Faithful Terrible Lizard."


You beat me to it.

/Hench 4 Life
 
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