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(ZDNet)   Refusing to wear a RFID-chipped badge? That's an expulsion   (zdnet.com) divider line 49
    More: Asinine, RFID, Rutherford Institute, tenth grade, surveillance state, badges, bar codes  
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7492 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Nov 2012 at 9:25 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-11-21 09:32:02 AM
4 votes:

hinten: Student makes all the right decision for all the wrong reasons.

" It is a direct violation of their Christian religious beliefs, as it bears a striking resemblance to Revelations 13: 16-18 warning of the Mark of the Beast."


the point about tracking children like inventory is well made though. we tell kids that this is the 'land of the free/home of the brave' yet we shelve and warehouse 'em like they're boxes. how are kids supposed to learn to be fully functional adults in a 'free society' when they spend their formative years being suppressed, tracked, numbered and filed? you don't spend your childhood being a number then suddenly BAM! 18 hits and you act like a perfectly normal human being who can function without being controlled? I don't think so. you raise a kid with blinders on, and it will take a VERY long time to him to figure out how to take them off.
2012-11-21 09:55:57 AM
3 votes:

the_geek: Bloody William: I hear stories about how the schools have changed since I graduated. Small steps at first, but then metal detectors, more surveillance, more strict rules.

You have to justify larger budgets somehow.


there's evidence enough to suggest that our culture is turning inwards, becoming more afraid and authoritarian than ever before. I never thought I'd live in a country where someone had to feel me up before I could board a plane. schools that make kids wear RFID chips and use inventory control software to track their movements implies a certain mindset.
2012-11-21 02:19:10 PM
2 votes:
They offered to let her wear a non-chipped version if she would publicly acknowledge her total compliance with the program and sign a form saying she did not object to the RFID tracking. She refused.

She stood up for what she believes, whether or not it was based in crazy religious B.S.-- You have to respect that.
2012-11-21 10:56:12 AM
2 votes:

hinten: Just wait til you get a load of my boobies.

BTW, the final project scope says 100,000 students across 112 schools.


kinda makes me think that someone on the school board has a relative who works for an RFID company...
2012-11-21 10:33:50 AM
2 votes:

Bhruic: dittybopper: You aren't required by law to attend work. If you have a problem with wearing an RFID, you can either work somewhere else, or just not work. School isn't like that. Schooling is *MANDATORY*, and very few people have the time and resources to home school their kids.

Homeschooling is legal in all 50 states. Therefore going to school is not mandatory.


OK, don't school your kids. Meaning, don't send them to school, and don't home school them. Going to school is mandatory.

Homeschooling is a very narrow exception to the rule that you have to send your kids to either a government run or equivalent private school, and a narrow exception that very few can actually do. My sister-in-law homeschooled her daughter and son for a few years, and it was a caste-iron biatch. She was a stay-at-home mom so she had the time, but it was so difficult that they eventually gave up and sent the kids to a private school instead. When they did enter school they were initially bored because they were advanced compared to their privately-schooled peers, though.

As a very narrow exception, it's not one that the vast majority of people could take advantage of. That's like requiring going through a metal detector before you fly, take a train, bus, or drive your own car. Sure, you could walk, ride a bike, or take a motorcycle, but that's not an option for the vast majority, and I'm sure no one would seriously argue that you "have options" in that case.
2012-11-21 10:27:39 AM
2 votes:
Badges? Badges? We don't need no stinkin' RFID badges!
2012-11-21 10:14:43 AM
2 votes:

hinten: Weaver95: hinten:
Sure Weaver and when teachers took attendance in the morning in the sixties it meant the communists had already won.

I am wracking my brains trying to figure out what the hell you are talking about....

The purpose of the badge program is tracking student attendance so the school can secure more funds for higher attendance rates. You know, kind of like teachers used to take attendance every morning using pen and paper.

Although the district will pay $500,000 up front for the program, is expects to garner $1.7 million from the state government in increased attendance funds.


Sounds like an expensive, oppressive solution to a cheap, simple problem.
2012-11-21 10:08:30 AM
2 votes:

Raharu: DoBeDoBeDo: serial_crusher: This allows the school to track the student's location after leaving campus and for as long as the badge is on the student's person.

So they wired up the whole city of San Antonio, possibly the entire world, with those RFID readers or what? And people say Texas doesn't spend enough on the education budget.

It will be years before people stop confusing GPS and RFID. I know a doctor who thought they could track his dog anywhere on earth because he was micro-chipped.
^^^^^^THIS^^^^^^^

Most people have no clue how RFID works, from the chips, to the readers to the databases they access.


As a programmer/analyst and RF geek, along with experience in both bar-code and RFID technology, I have a pretty damned good understanding of how they work.

I wouldn't want my kid to wear one, and I'd fully support their decision not to be required to wear an RFID badge.

The point that Weaver95 made above is a good one: You can't raise independent minded adults by treating them like cattle all their lives. Someone who is accustomed to wearing an RFID badge through years of mandatory schooling isn't going to care as much if that becomes a requirement for the citizenry in general.

Note that is distinct from wearing one as a condition for something like building access at work: Work is a voluntary activity. If you have a problem with wearing an RFID badge at work, you can always find other work, go into business for yourself, or just not work if you don't want to.

This general idea is why I'm also against metal detectors in schools, which is a perennial source of disagreement between the distaffbopper and I: She sees it from a narrow viewpoint, protecting individual kids from a possible threat. I see from a more expansive viewpoint, in that you are training kids who will one day be adults that persons in authority can violate the Fourth Amendment at will. And yes, I consider a metal detector in school a violation: You are required to attend school by law, and if the school you must attend requires that you to enter a metal detector as a condition for attending, then that is a violation. It's different for airports: Air travel is a voluntary activity, so consenting to a search can be made a condition of that travel, and there are generally other options (train, bus, car, etc.). Since by law you must attend schooling, and if the school requires that you enter a metal detector, there is no way to legally avoid the search.

Also, from the standpoint of preventing weapons from entering school, it's at best a very, very weak solution. I taught the 12 year old kid up the street how to knap glass into an effective blade/projectile point, and that won't show up in a metal detector. Neither would a carefully constructed zip gun.
2012-11-21 10:04:40 AM
2 votes:

hinten:
Sure Weaver and when teachers took attendance in the morning in the sixties it meant the communists had already won.


I am wracking my brains trying to figure out what the hell you are talking about....
2012-11-21 10:01:51 AM
2 votes:

Bloody William: Weaver95: hinten: Student makes all the right decision for all the wrong reasons.

" It is a direct violation of their Christian religious beliefs, as it bears a striking resemblance to Revelations 13: 16-18 warning of the Mark of the Beast."

the point about tracking children like inventory is well made though. we tell kids that this is the 'land of the free/home of the brave' yet we shelve and warehouse 'em like they're boxes. how are kids supposed to learn to be fully functional adults in a 'free society' when they spend their formative years being suppressed, tracked, numbered and filed? you don't spend your childhood being a number then suddenly BAM! 18 hits and you act like a perfectly normal human being who can function without being controlled? I don't think so. you raise a kid with blinders on, and it will take a VERY long time to him to figure out how to take them off.

The worst thing we ever did as a society was conflate people with capital. Turning "personnel" into "human resources." Describing "human capital" as livestock that can be discarded. Looking at children not as potential greatness but as potential malcontents that must be regulated and tracked with more diligence than prisons track criminals......


THIS
2012-11-21 09:56:40 AM
2 votes:

wingnut396: Whatever. Know what happens if I refuse to wear my RFID badge at work? Want to 'escape' the terrible US without using your RFID enabled passports? RFID is not magic. It is just an updated method for computers to read the contents of whatever is placed on them, just like your magnetic strip on your credit card, driver's license, passport, old school badges. Yes they can be read without actual contact, so that is reason to see what they are storing on the chip itself. If, as the article suggests, it is just a student ID or other serialized number, that is linked in the central computer system, to their other information, big whoop. If it is actually storing SSN and other vital information (doubtful) on the RFID itself, that is a problem.


Work is private, compensated, optional (relatively speaking), and can justify its security measures clearly. It isn't about the actual tracking, but the creeping sense of needing to be tagged and measured. It's the electronic version of being forced to have papers on you at all times.

There's a very big difference in attitude between using a card to get into places and being forced to keep a card on hand at all times so other people know where you are.
2012-11-21 09:48:39 AM
2 votes:

Weaver95: hinten: Student makes all the right decision for all the wrong reasons.

" It is a direct violation of their Christian religious beliefs, as it bears a striking resemblance to Revelations 13: 16-18 warning of the Mark of the Beast."

the point about tracking children like inventory is well made though. we tell kids that this is the 'land of the free/home of the brave' yet we shelve and warehouse 'em like they're boxes. how are kids supposed to learn to be fully functional adults in a 'free society' when they spend their formative years being suppressed, tracked, numbered and filed? you don't spend your childhood being a number then suddenly BAM! 18 hits and you act like a perfectly normal human being who can function without being controlled? I don't think so. you raise a kid with blinders on, and it will take a VERY long time to him to figure out how to take them off.


The worst thing we ever did as a society was conflate people with capital. Turning "personnel" into "human resources." Describing "human capital" as livestock that can be discarded. Looking at children not as potential greatness but as potential malcontents that must be regulated and tracked with more diligence than prisons track criminals.

This is a symptom of a much larger problem in education and treatment of children. This might be a CSB, but if I graduated a few years later than I did, I might not have graduated at all. When I was finishing school, the school was still getting used to helicopter parents and paranoia about Columbine. I was a malcontent at times. I was a stereotypical nerd, argumentative in English class, more than a little of my head up my ass, but a good student with a small clique of friends and a bullying problem that lasted into my sophomore year. I was suspended a few times for fighting. In one case, I flipped out during gym class and turned a shoving match into a head butt and broken nose that got me suspended for two days. This was just around the time of Columbine, and considering my attitude and actions, there's every chance that if my behavior was seen a few months or a few years later, I would have been expelled or even arrested.

I hear stories about how the schools have changed since I graduated. Small steps at first, but then metal detectors, more surveillance, more strict rules.
2012-11-21 09:31:10 AM
2 votes:
Refusing to wear a RFID-chipped badge? Ok we'll be reasonable, will you wear a badge that doesn't have one? That's an expulsion 

FTFY subby.

/Stupid idea nonetheless
//Let the helicopter parents track their own kids
2012-11-21 09:00:45 AM
2 votes:
This allows the school to track the student's location after leaving campus and for as long as the badge is on the student's person.

So they wired up the whole city of San Antonio, possibly the entire world, with those RFID readers or what? And people say Texas doesn't spend enough on the education budget.
2012-11-21 08:25:35 AM
2 votes:
Student makes all the right decision for all the wrong reasons.

" It is a direct violation of their Christian religious beliefs, as it bears a striking resemblance to Revelations 13: 16-18 warning of the Mark of the Beast."
2012-11-21 08:18:45 PM
1 votes:
So what i gather from this thread is that the slippery slope isn't a fallacy and there are plenty of folks begging for a jackboot on their throats
2012-11-21 04:47:07 PM
1 votes:
and yet she happily carries around her cellphone wherever she goes, LOL.
2012-11-21 03:29:48 PM
1 votes:

HindiDiscoMonster: hinten: Student makes all the right decision for all the wrong reasons.

" It is a direct violation of their Christian religious beliefs, as it bears a striking resemblance to Revelations 13: 16-18 warning of the Mark of the Beast."

What is wrong about the reasons? Those are her beliefs. Doesn't matter if she is right or wrong. We are supposed to have religious freedom right? So if she should not base her decision on her beliefs, what should she do... base them on someone else' beliefs?


Freedom of religion is part of the first amendment. Just like freedom of speech.

Schools are able to restrict students' speech. Why can't the school ignore a student's religious beliefs as well?
2012-11-21 03:11:24 PM
1 votes:
Thank Bog we have money for this system but not for paper and pencils.
2012-11-21 02:56:00 PM
1 votes:
Yup. Infowars.

The same people who believe that 9/11 was directly engineered by the United States government and their NWO/Illuminati/Reptilian masters. The cranks that believe FEMA runs concentration camps.
2012-11-21 02:01:11 PM
1 votes:
Sure, give kids the ability to create alibis with little to no effort.
"There's no way I beat him up, I was in the library! Check my badge if you don't believe me!"

Or better yet, steal the unpopular kid's badge, trash the place, and disappear into the night leaving all evidence pointing to someone else. Yes, what could possibly go wrong.

And this is coming from someone who thinks RFID is pretty cool.
2012-11-21 01:16:23 PM
1 votes:
Over 116 posts and no one has mentioned why schools want to use RFID.

It's about money, of course. Schools get money based on average daily attendance. If a kid doesn't answer classroom roll call, the school loses money. But if the school can verify that the kid is somewhere on campus, no money is lost. RFID does the job.
2012-11-21 10:52:27 AM
1 votes:

serial_crusher: I think there's enough history of witnesses, judges, jurors being gunned down on courthouse steps (well, it happens all the time on TV anyhow)


Metal detectors won't prevent anyone from gunning people down on the courthouse steps, since that is still outside. In fact, the easiest place to shoot people would be as they are waiting in line for the metal detector.

Seriously, though, Colorado had a spate of men shooting their wives' divorce lawyers inside courtrooms back in the eighties. Apparently you could walk into a courtroom "carrying" back then.
2012-11-21 10:49:46 AM
1 votes:

serial_crusher: dittybopper: You are required to attend school by law, and if the school you must attend requires that you to enter a metal detector as a condition for attending, then that is a violation

How do you feel about metal detectors in courthouses? People aren't going there voluntarily, whether they're there in police custody or just attending jury duty; but I think there's enough history of witnesses, judges, jurors being gunned down on courthouse steps (well, it happens all the time on TV anyhow) to say that maybe your 2nd and 4th amendments should be bent a little in that particular location.


With the exception of those who are under criminal indictment, which does temporarily suspend some of their rights, entrance into a court is strictly voluntary.

I know, because as a foster parent I attend court on a semi-regular basis. I've no problem going through the metal detector there, because it's voluntary for me and for all the employees and other witnesses, and it's a very narrow exception that is tailored to address a very specific governmental function.
2012-11-21 10:47:07 AM
1 votes:

hinten: Student makes all the right decision for all the wrong reasons.


Well, it is Texas, so the "Mark of the Beast" excuse could actually gain some traction. If she were in Massachusetts, claiming that RF exposure causes cancer might be the way to go.
2012-11-21 10:35:43 AM
1 votes:

dittybopper: wingnut396: Whatever. Know what happens if I refuse to wear my RFID badge at work?

You aren't required by law to attend work. If you have a problem with wearing an RFID, you can either work somewhere else, or just not work. School isn't like that. Schooling is *MANDATORY*, and very few people have the time and resources to home school their kids.


So? Not everyone has the resources to go into business for themselves at the same rate they may earn at a place the requires them to wear a badge? Many States also now have RFID chips in the driver's licenses. Of course you are not REQUIRED to get one, but good luck moving around today's society with one.

Again, the root problem is not RFID. You complain that RFID is not very secure, which is mostly true. But I have feeling that if a 'magic' full secure analog to RFID was made, you would not be in support of it. I also take issue with the people worried that their kids will be tracked 'everywhere' with theses school IDs. That is a gross misunderstanding of how the technology works and conflating it with some biblical nonsense does no one any favors.

The root problem seems to be compliance with constant identification. I have sympathy for this issue and see that having to prove who you are and why you think you have the right to be somewhere is not always a good thing.
2012-11-21 10:30:04 AM
1 votes:

hinten:

Who knows? I imagine they also secure their buildings with card readers, libraries, cafeteria, etc.
They should have called the program something different and only the craziest religious zealots that think wearing an ID is the sign of the devil would have complained. Wait, what?
Link

It's more than Fark, it's InfoWars.


again - you aren't justifying the associated costs very well. education budgets are already tight. why implement an expensive security system with well known flaws when there are cheaper (and less dehumanizing) alternatives?
2012-11-21 10:27:30 AM
1 votes:

JinxofSpades: She should also be concerned about walking around on campus, anyway. Those cards are probably using 13.56MHz RFID, and will require the students to be constantly bombarded with high frequency waves


They are already bombarded with 14.000 to 14.350 MHz waves, pretty much continuously. In fact, I'm bombarding people near me with 14.027 MHz waves right now, with an EIRP of about 250 watts.

CQ CQ CQ DE N2-SOMETHING-SOMETHING-SOMETHING
2012-11-21 10:21:53 AM
1 votes:
Sorry Luddites but the future is coming, RFID is not invasive.

When an RFID tagged school has a shooting and the police are able to tell if the kids are out of the building, or who is still trapped inside I think you may change your tune...

When something insane goes down at a factory, and the EMS crews need to know the last location of employees, or where to search for survivors or bodies I think this tech will show its value.

toot toot.

As long as RFID chips are not INSIDE you, its possible to ditch the tag... they even offered this chump an RFID free badge.
2012-11-21 10:15:36 AM
1 votes:

dittybopper: wingnut396: Whatever. Know what happens if I refuse to wear my RFID badge at work?

You aren't required by law to attend work. If you have a problem with wearing an RFID, you can either work somewhere else, or just not work. School isn't like that. Schooling is *MANDATORY*, and very few people have the time and resources to home school their kids.


I always thought it was because they didn't want their kids to end up as socially-awkward weirdos
2012-11-21 10:15:28 AM
1 votes:

hinten:
The purpose of the badge program is tracking student attendance so the school can secure more funds for higher attendance rates. You know, kind of like teachers used to take attendance every morning using pen and paper.


so why not just...take attendance with pen and paper? that's cheap. setting up and maintaining an RFID system is money up front, plus money for badges for each new class AND maintaining the integrity of the student/teacher RFID/user database. seems a pointless expense when you could just have kids attend home room for 15 min at the start of the day, take attendance and then go about the day as per normal.
2012-11-21 10:12:11 AM
1 votes:

Weaver95: hinten:
Sure Weaver and when teachers took attendance in the morning in the sixties it meant the communists had already won.

I am wracking my brains trying to figure out what the hell you are talking about....


The purpose of the badge program is tracking student attendance so the school can secure more funds for higher attendance rates. You know, kind of like teachers used to take attendance every morning using pen and paper.

Although the district will pay $500,000 up front for the program, is expects to garner $1.7 million from the state government in increased attendance funds.
2012-11-21 10:12:04 AM
1 votes:

Weaver95: Bloody William: Weaver95: I tend to see RFID as a crutch. sure, it's good for tracking inventory...but you start using it on people and it goes off the rails. for starters - most RFID isn't even encrypted. I scanned my badge once, and the data wasn't encoded. I could have cloned that badge and the badges of my coworkers no problem. would have given me unlimited access to the facilities even AFTER the layoffs. my point is that boxes of inventory don't get curious and take apart the security to see what makes it tick. people can and sometimes do. so if you were expecting RFID to be some sort of magical perfect way of keeping track of a population (be that in a school or office) then I've got some bad news for you....

RFID can be hacked to shiat with some pretty cheap tech. I'd love to see students at this school steal a teacher or janitor's card (or just bribe them to borrow it) and copy the ID tag, encode it on an RFID sticker, and slap it over their card.

its not even all that difficult or expensive. you could do it for under $200 if you wanted to go cheap. $500 and it starts getting fancy. there are tutorials all around the net on how to capture and clone RFID signals.


I bet I could "foil" it for just a penny or two.

/Get it?
2012-11-21 10:10:57 AM
1 votes:

wingnut396: Whatever. Know what happens if I refuse to wear my RFID badge at work?


You aren't required by law to attend work. If you have a problem with wearing an RFID, you can either work somewhere else, or just not work. School isn't like that. Schooling is *MANDATORY*, and very few people have the time and resources to home school their kids.
2012-11-21 10:07:44 AM
1 votes:

Bloody William: Weaver95: I tend to see RFID as a crutch. sure, it's good for tracking inventory...but you start using it on people and it goes off the rails. for starters - most RFID isn't even encrypted. I scanned my badge once, and the data wasn't encoded. I could have cloned that badge and the badges of my coworkers no problem. would have given me unlimited access to the facilities even AFTER the layoffs. my point is that boxes of inventory don't get curious and take apart the security to see what makes it tick. people can and sometimes do. so if you were expecting RFID to be some sort of magical perfect way of keeping track of a population (be that in a school or office) then I've got some bad news for you....

RFID can be hacked to shiat with some pretty cheap tech. I'd love to see students at this school steal a teacher or janitor's card (or just bribe them to borrow it) and copy the ID tag, encode it on an RFID sticker, and slap it over their card.


its not even all that difficult or expensive. you could do it for under $200 if you wanted to go cheap. $500 and it starts getting fancy. there are tutorials all around the net on how to capture and clone RFID signals.
2012-11-21 10:06:54 AM
1 votes:

Vaneshi: WAIT!

They offered her, repeatedly, a badge that did not have the RFID chip inside of it and could not be tracked beyond the door mechanisms that read the barcode/magstripe.

Ok, so if they are happy to let one student opt-out of this 'safety' system then why not allow all of the students, who you are trying to bring up to be good citizens in the 'land of the free' to opt-out of the system if they so choose?

Once you've got all the forms back you know how many RFID enabled badges you need... and how many you need to put in the microwave for a few seconds.


It's a pretty clear techno-boondoggle with little to no value at all.
2012-11-21 10:05:12 AM
1 votes:
WAIT!

They offered her, repeatedly, a badge that did not have the RFID chip inside of it and could not be tracked beyond the door mechanisms that read the barcode/magstripe.

Ok, so if they are happy to let one student opt-out of this 'safety' system then why not allow all of the students, who you are trying to bring up to be good citizens in the 'land of the free' to opt-out of the system if they so choose?

Once you've got all the forms back you know how many RFID enabled badges you need... and how many you need to put in the microwave for a few seconds.
2012-11-21 10:03:09 AM
1 votes:

Bloody William: wingnut396: Whatever. Know what happens if I refuse to wear my RFID badge at work? Want to 'escape' the terrible US without using your RFID enabled passports? RFID is not magic. It is just an updated method for computers to read the contents of whatever is placed on them, just like your magnetic strip on your credit card, driver's license, passport, old school badges. Yes they can be read without actual contact, so that is reason to see what they are storing on the chip itself. If, as the article suggests, it is just a student ID or other serialized number, that is linked in the central computer system, to their other information, big whoop. If it is actually storing SSN and other vital information (doubtful) on the RFID itself, that is a problem.

Work is private, compensated, optional (relatively speaking), and can justify its security measures clearly. It isn't about the actual tracking, but the creeping sense of needing to be tagged and measured. It's the electronic version of being forced to have papers on you at all times.

There's a very big difference in attitude between using a card to get into places and being forced to keep a card on hand at all times so other people know where you are.


There is a difference. IBM required us to have our badges visible at all times; they were for more than opening doors. MindSpring, however, issued us a little keychain fob for getting into the building -- but that was in the late 90s.
2012-11-21 10:02:25 AM
1 votes:

wingnut396:

Whatever. Know what happens if I refuse to wear my RFID badge at work? Want to 'escape' the terrible US without using your RFID enabled passports? RFID is not magic. It is just an updated method for computers to read the contents of whatever is placed on them, just like your magnetic strip on your credit card, driver's license, passport, old school badges. Yes they can be read without actual contact, so that is reason to see what they are storing on the chip itself. If, as the article suggests, it is just a student ID or other serialized number, that is linked in the central computer system, to their other information, big whoop. If it is actually storing SSN and other vital information (doubtful) on the RFID itself, that is a problem.


I tend to see RFID as a crutch. sure, it's good for tracking inventory...but you start using it on people and it goes off the rails. for starters - most RFID isn't even encrypted. I scanned my badge once, and the data wasn't encoded. I could have cloned that badge and the badges of my coworkers no problem. would have given me unlimited access to the facilities even AFTER the layoffs. my point is that boxes of inventory don't get curious and take apart the security to see what makes it tick. people can and sometimes do. so if you were expecting RFID to be some sort of magical perfect way of keeping track of a population (be that in a school or office) then I've got some bad news for you....
2012-11-21 09:59:27 AM
1 votes:

JinxofSpades: Raharu:

Most people have no clue how RFID works, from the chips, to the readers to the databases they access.

As someone who works with all of the above, a hearty THIS to you, sir.

/yes, I am getting a kick...


Weaver95: there's evidence enough to suggest that our culture is turning inwards, becoming more afraid and authoritarian than ever before. I never thought I'd live in a country where someone had to feel me up before I could board a plane. schools that make kids wear RFID chips and use inventory control software to track their movements implies a certain mindset.


The technical aspects don't worry me in this case, but the implication and creeping sense of oppression without merit is the problem. How much more creep will we accept before kids are completely dehumanized and turned into drones, with the few who resist being simply thrown out?
2012-11-21 09:59:21 AM
1 votes:

Weaver95: hinten: Student makes all the right decision for all the wrong reasons.

" It is a direct violation of their Christian religious beliefs, as it bears a striking resemblance to Revelations 13: 16-18 warning of the Mark of the Beast."

the point about tracking children like inventory is well made though. we tell kids that this is the 'land of the free/home of the brave' yet we shelve and warehouse 'em like they're boxes. how are kids supposed to learn to be fully functional adults in a 'free society' when they spend their formative years being suppressed, tracked, numbered and filed? you don't spend your childhood being a number then suddenly BAM! 18 hits and you act like a perfectly normal human being who can function without being controlled? I don't think so. you raise a kid with blinders on, and it will take a VERY long time to him to figure out how to take them off.


This.

/sheltered
2012-11-21 09:53:53 AM
1 votes:

Raharu: DoBeDoBeDo: serial_crusher: This allows the school to track the student's location after leaving campus and for as long as the badge is on the student's person.

So they wired up the whole city of San Antonio, possibly the entire world, with those RFID readers or what? And people say Texas doesn't spend enough on the education budget.

It will be years before people stop confusing GPS and RFID. I know a doctor who thought they could track his dog anywhere on earth because he was micro-chipped.
^^^^^^THIS^^^^^^^

Most people have no clue how RFID works, from the chips, to the readers to the databases they access.


That did kind of stick out to me. RFID would work if there are sensors around the school, logging student activity (which is skeevy, but not a student-tracking system outside the school). It's total bullshiat, but not black helicopter level bullshiat. Just usual district overreaching in trying to find and crush any sort of sense of freedom within what amount to modern, mandatory juvenile halls at this point.
2012-11-21 09:52:58 AM
1 votes:

Weaver95: hinten: Student makes all the right decision for all the wrong reasons.

" It is a direct violation of their Christian religious beliefs, as it bears a striking resemblance to Revelations 13: 16-18 warning of the Mark of the Beast."

the point about tracking children like inventory is well made though. we tell kids that this is the 'land of the free/home of the brave' yet we shelve and warehouse 'em like they're boxes. how are kids supposed to learn to be fully functional adults in a 'free society' when they spend their formative years being suppressed, tracked, numbered and filed? you don't spend your childhood being a number then suddenly BAM! 18 hits and you act like a perfectly normal human being who can function without being controlled? I don't think so. you raise a kid with blinders on, and it will take a VERY long time to him to figure out how to take them off.


Whatever. Know what happens if I refuse to wear my RFID badge at work? Want to 'escape' the terrible US without using your RFID enabled passports? RFID is not magic. It is just an updated method for computers to read the contents of whatever is placed on them, just like your magnetic strip on your credit card, driver's license, passport, old school badges. Yes they can be read without actual contact, so that is reason to see what they are storing on the chip itself. If, as the article suggests, it is just a student ID or other serialized number, that is linked in the central computer system, to their other information, big whoop. If it is actually storing SSN and other vital information (doubtful) on the RFID itself, that is a problem.
2012-11-21 09:42:47 AM
1 votes:

DoBeDoBeDo: serial_crusher: This allows the school to track the student's location after leaving campus and for as long as the badge is on the student's person.

So they wired up the whole city of San Antonio, possibly the entire world, with those RFID readers or what? And people say Texas doesn't spend enough on the education budget.

It will be years before people stop confusing GPS and RFID. I know a doctor who thought they could track his dog anywhere on earth because he was micro-chipped.

^^^^^^THIS^^^^^^^


Most people have no clue how RFID works, from the chips, to the readers to the databases they access.
2012-11-21 09:40:17 AM
1 votes:
And yet the parents expect you to be able to locate their kid and have them delivered to the office in two minutes if they show up at any time of the day without notice - - - failure to do so results (often) in the parent pitching a fit that they're in a hurry and running late for (doctor, dentist, funeral etc.)
2012-11-21 09:34:25 AM
1 votes:

serial_crusher: This allows the school to track the student's location after leaving campus and for as long as the badge is on the student's person.

So they wired up the whole city of San Antonio, possibly the entire world, with those RFID readers or what? And people say Texas doesn't spend enough on the education budget.


It will be years before people stop confusing GPS and RFID. I know a doctor who thought they could track his dog anywhere on earth because he was micro-chipped.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-11-21 09:33:31 AM
1 votes:
Are expelled kids in Texas freed from school obligations, or do they have to move on to another school, and another school, and another... ?
2012-11-21 09:26:01 AM
1 votes:
according to Infowars.

WTF?
2012-11-21 09:06:18 AM
1 votes:
"In the event that you change your stance on wearing the ID with the battery and chip removed as has been offered to you on two occasions, we will be more than willing to rescind this withdrawal notice."

Attention Whore.

/My interest, done.
 
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