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(Yahoo)   Ever wondered what would happen if we released 42,000 cubic feet of water per second into the Grand Canyon? Well, wonder no more (with pics)   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 6
    More: Cool, Grand Canyon, Bureau of Reclamation, Colorado River, water management, Lake Mead, Sonoran Desert, Alot, Grand Canyon National Park  
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30034 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Nov 2012 at 9:53 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-11-21 11:32:02 AM
2 votes:
The problem I see with this is that the water coming out of the lake is going to be relatively sediment free compared to a natural flood. I'm not sure how successful it will really be in rebuilding any beaches... Methinks they didn't think their plan through...
2012-11-21 11:29:37 AM
2 votes:
Until the dams are destroyed, this is nothing but putting a bandaid on a hatchet wound. How are the beaches going to be rebuilt without the silt? The flooding is just sending more water down the river.

Glen Canyon Dam needs to be decommissioned and torn down. The boating industry can go f*ck themselves.
cdn3.standard.net
2012-11-21 11:27:52 AM
1 votes:
The only problem here is that it is 42,000 cfs of cold, clear water that flows from Lake Powell into the Grand Canyon, so unless the Paria and Little Colorado Rivers are running muddy, all this does is transport sand down to Lake Mead! This is a useless make-work experiment repeated several times before that has no lasting effect for the Grand Canyon except to remove sand from Marble Canyon and dump it in the upper reaches of Lake Mead. Taxpayor funds should not be used to repeat and repeat a failed "study"! Otherwise, it is a great time to be on the river - we flipped 3 out of 6 boats in Lava Falls at 28,000 cfs and once ran it at about 60,000 cfs and chased upside-down rafts for miles! "Normal" flows (post-dam) are about 8,000 -16,000 CFS depending upon electricity demand.
2012-11-21 10:32:58 AM
1 votes:

guilt by association: This is too much Wharrgarbl...

[l1.yimg.com image 850x560]


i.imgur.com
2012-11-21 10:14:37 AM
1 votes:

Ficoce: Currently, sand and mud piles up behind the dam and natural beaches and sandbars have disappeared, allowing predatory non-native fish such as rainbow trout to flourish.

Umm, I think Rainbow trout are the native ones, with the resulting Steelhead salmon being decimated by the dam. German brown trout on the other hand....(are there browns down there?)


Rainbow trout are not native, the native species are things like chub and various types of minnows. They don't survive well in the cold water released from the bottom of the damn, so I'm not sure how much this will really help them....
2012-11-21 09:58:39 AM
1 votes:
Better than wasting it in Southern California.
 
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