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(The Register)   "We interrupt your program with this important news bulletin: Swollen SUPER-GIGANTO PLANET sighted in Andromeda"   (theregister.co.uk) divider line 40
    More: Interesting, Constellation Andromeda, planets, light-years, Giganto, Subaru Telescope, dwarfs, orb, change of position  
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4529 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Nov 2012 at 6:20 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-21 12:28:19 AM  
That's hot.
 
2012-11-21 12:38:20 AM  
astroboffins

I'm pretty sure about 80% of British English is made up to fark with Americans

/cabbaged astroboffins chaff over planet
 
2012-11-21 01:32:20 AM  
Oh boy, another exciting discovery of a ball of gas.

It's not like we've ever found one of those before.
 
2012-11-21 01:56:54 AM  

doglover: Oh boy, another exciting discovery of a ball of gas.

It's not like we've ever found one of those before.



Yes, but you must keep in mind that few, if any, before this have fallen under the classification 'swollen SUPER-GIGANTO PLANET'. That distinction must be made.
 
2012-11-21 02:00:44 AM  

doglover: Oh boy, another exciting discovery of a ball of gas.

It's not like we've ever found one of those before.


this one is not in congress.
 
2012-11-21 06:26:34 AM  
Bad article headline. It should specify the Andromeda constellation or the star Kappa Andromodae. Using just "Andromeda" makes people who just glance at it think the planet was in another galaxy.
 
2012-11-21 06:42:46 AM  
Artist's depiction:

O                                                                       .
 
2012-11-21 06:56:25 AM  

SnarfVader: Bad article headline. It should specify the Andromeda constellation or the star Kappa Andromodae. Using just "Andromeda" makes people who just glance at it think the planet was in another galaxy.


What..it could be a REALLY big farkin planet.
 
2012-11-21 07:30:33 AM  
Wouldn't 13 times the mass of Jupiter make it a small brown dwarf and not a planet? I thought the cut off point of planets was 10 mass Jupiter and at 13 mass Jupiter they started fusing deuterium.
 
2012-11-21 07:37:38 AM  

SnarfVader: Bad article headline. It should specify the Andromeda constellation or the star Kappa Andromodae. Using just "Andromeda" makes people who just glance at it think the planet was in another galaxy.


^What he said.
 
2012-11-21 07:40:37 AM  

BSABSVR: astroboffins

I'm pretty sure about 80% of British English is made up to fark with Americans

/cabbaged astroboffins chaff over planet


That's the site that call Microsoft "Vole" and Intel "Chipzilla"
 
2012-11-21 07:43:41 AM  
FTA: astroboffins

I'm so bonzer to be an astroboffin?
 
2012-11-21 07:47:14 AM  

Korzine: Wouldn't 13 times the mass of Jupiter make it a small brown dwarf and not a planet? I thought the cut off point of planets was 10 mass Jupiter and at 13 mass Jupiter they started fusing deuterium.


from the tiny bit I know, plus a wikipedia article, brown dwarf stars form independently, gas giants don't.

Brown dwarfs form independently, like stars, but lack sufficient mass to "ignite" as stars do. Like all stars, they can occur singly or in close proximity to other stars. Some orbit stars and can, like planets, have eccentric orbits.

Currently, the International Astronomical Union considers an object with a mass above the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium (currently calculated to be 13 Jupiter masses for objects of solar metallicity) to be a brown dwarf, whereas an object under that mass (and orbiting a star or stellar remnant) is considered a planet.[5]
 
2012-11-21 07:55:01 AM  
That's not a planet


/oblig
 
2012-11-21 07:56:44 AM  
I'm confused.

I submitted this same article with "OMG SUPER-GIGANTO PLANET sighted. Astroboffins changing underwear as we speak" as a headline. Subby's is better so I'm not whining about that.

I don't understand how two people can submit the same article. Doesn't the 2nd get rejected?

/I always 'check link' as the 1st thing before submitting.
 
2012-11-21 07:56:52 AM  
I liked it better when we had this thread the other day.
 
2012-11-21 07:58:00 AM  
You know what they say...big star, big planet.

/also, once you go giant gasball, you never go back
 
2012-11-21 08:06:39 AM  

log_jammin: doglover: Oh boy, another exciting discovery of a ball of gas.

It's not like we've ever found one of those before.

this one is not in congress.


In congress with what?
 
2012-11-21 08:10:25 AM  

Virtuoso80: log_jammin: doglover: Oh boy, another exciting discovery of a ball of gas.

It's not like we've ever found one of those before.

this one is not in congress.

In congress with what?


Your mom?

/Too easy.
 
2012-11-21 08:34:37 AM  

dittybopper: I liked it better when we had this thread the other day.


I also like how this article doesn't even show the picture, which is the reason why this planet is even in the news
 
2012-11-21 08:45:12 AM  

log_jammin: Korzine: Wouldn't 13 times the mass of Jupiter make it a small brown dwarf and not a planet? I thought the cut off point of planets was 10 mass Jupiter and at 13 mass Jupiter they started fusing deuterium.

from the tiny bit I know, plus a wikipedia article, brown dwarf stars form independently, gas giants don't.

Brown dwarfs form independently, like stars, but lack sufficient mass to "ignite" as stars do. Like all stars, they can occur singly or in close proximity to other stars. Some orbit stars and can, like planets, have eccentric orbits.

Currently, the International Astronomical Union considers an object with a mass above the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium (currently calculated to be 13 Jupiter masses for objects of solar metallicity) to be a brown dwarf, whereas an object under that mass (and orbiting a star or stellar remnant) is considered a planet.[5]


Thus, the "super planet" is a brown dwarf, making the Kappa Andromodae an almost binary system. I find that to be a little more interesting.

Aboleth: SnarfVader: Bad article headline. It should specify the Andromeda constellation or the star Kappa Andromodae. Using just "Andromeda" makes people who just glance at it think the planet was in another galaxy.

^What he said.


Ditto.
 
2012-11-21 08:46:27 AM  
A gigantic super-planet has been snapped by astroboffins orbiting the massive star Kappa Andromedae.

How did we get astroboffins in orbit around another star?

/Many boffins died to bring us this information.
 
2012-11-21 08:58:04 AM  

Kibbler: /also, once you go giant gasball, you never go back


Why would anyone willingly have sex with Michael Moore?
 
2012-11-21 09:05:06 AM  
Nibiru. Call it what it is.
 
2012-11-21 09:21:18 AM  

PirateKing: A gigantic super-planet has been snapped by astroboffins orbiting the massive star Kappa Andromedae.

How did we get astroboffins in orbit around another star?

/Many boffins died to bring us this information.


Boooooooooo......
 
2012-11-21 09:21:30 AM  

Kibbler: /also, once you go giant gasball, you never go back


Strong gravitational field, huh?
 
2012-11-21 09:22:20 AM  

PirateKing: How did we get astroboffins in orbit around another star?


And how many should we feed Pikachu to get him to finally evolve?
 
2012-11-21 09:27:01 AM  
I'd swell my super-giganto planet in Andromeda if you know what I mean.
 
2012-11-21 09:56:45 AM  

Solon Isonomia:
Thus, the "super planet" is a brown dwarf, making the Kappa Andromodae an almost binary system. I find that to be a little more interesting.


Dead brown dwarf according to the article from a few days ago. It's interesting I agree and I wonder if we'd be able to learn anything about star life cycles from poking at it.

I still say it's a bit weird calling a dead brown dwarf star a 'planet' though. And similarly it's no great surprise that a star (dwarf or not) is substantially larger than Jupiter; Jupiter's tiny in gas giant terms... it's a real runt of the litter.
 
2012-11-21 10:02:06 AM  
Have they proven the Horrendous Space Kablooie yet?
 
2012-11-21 11:03:21 AM  
The star is so huge, it can be seen with the naked eye

Wow. That must be really big. I don't recall ever hearing about a star that big before.
 
2012-11-21 11:20:33 AM  

Vaneshi: Dead brown dwarf according to the article from a few days ago.


Didn't he used to be part of the Whack Pack?
 
2012-11-21 12:25:26 PM  
To those people who devour the news this should come as no big surprise. The ever-growing obesity problem has swollen to engulf not just our bloated planet but has enlarged to encompass the entire galactic system. This weighty problem will soon become a giant burden to the balance of the universe. Toppling the Hostess Ho-ho empire was the first tottering step to completing the mammoth task of winning the battle of the bulge. There is hope for you, you giant, gaseous neighbor! We will help support you! Be strong!
 
2012-11-21 12:43:58 PM  

Aboleth: SnarfVader: Bad article headline. It should specify the Andromeda constellation or the star Kappa Andromodae. Using just "Andromeda" makes people who just glance at it think the planet was in another galaxy.

^What he said.


Well, I don't think we're able to detect an individual planet in other galaxies yet. But yes.

Also,this reads like some guy making more effort trying to sound cool than he is at actually conveying information. Phil Plait's excitement level is around 11; but that's his appeal. Science *is* exciting and he tries really hard to explain why these discoveries are so awesome. (See dittybopper's link to Phil's version of the same story)
 
2012-11-21 12:49:52 PM  

StopLurkListen: Also,this reads like some guy making more effort trying to sound cool than he is at actually conveying information.


FTA: "astroboffins".

Whatever gave you that idea?
 
2012-11-21 01:31:19 PM  
Nibiru
 
2012-11-21 07:59:44 PM  
Needs more boffins.
 
2012-11-21 08:50:33 PM  
Oh, wow, an artist's rendition. How novel.

Put me down for "useless without pics".
 
2012-11-21 11:36:15 PM  

log_jammin: doglover: Oh boy, another exciting discovery of a ball of gas.

It's not like we've ever found one of those before.

this one is not in congress.


It's not on the radio, either.
 
2012-11-22 04:44:32 AM  
And of course, they include an illustration, but not the actual image.
Here:
i.imgur.com
 
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