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(The Hollywood Reporter)   Hollywood Reporter apologizes for starting up the 50's era Communist blacklist that destroyed countless careers and reputations. It did give us Arthur Miller's "The Crucible," though, so it wasn't all bad   (hollywoodreporter.com) divider line 25
    More: Followup, The Hollywood Reporter, Hollywood, Arthur Miller, blacklists, WGA, predations, Spartacus, THR  
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1356 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 20 Nov 2012 at 12:06 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-20 10:03:07 AM  
Better late than never, I guess.

Wait (FTA): Today, in the first-ever exploration of a demagogue's mission and the lives destroyed, his son writes a formal apology.

His Son? WTF?
 
2012-11-20 12:14:45 PM  
IN BEFORE THE LOCK!

the whole "cold war" was a waste of time, lives and ..well you name it...

watching those Yankee Doodle Dandies waving their Chinese made American flags out the window of their Korean trucks makes me howl..HOWL with laughter..

see, you can win over smart people with an idea...stupid people are won over by trinkets...

ENJOY AMERICUH
 
2012-11-20 12:27:23 PM  
This is a great idea, now that everyone who had their lives ruined by it is dead.
 
2012-11-20 12:27:33 PM  
TFA isn't the apology. It's the long-winded, self-serving and self-aggrandizing story about how awesomely awesome the Hollywood Reporter is / was. The apology (and skip to the last line for it) is here. And as Cythraul points out, it's not the THR that aplogizes, but Billy Wilkerson's son that apologizes on behalf of his dad.

So, that's nice.
 
2012-11-20 12:31:28 PM  
Well if the unions wouldn't have courted the communist and socialist parties then none of the blacklist would have happened. But sean penn vilifying people who had nothing to do with blacklisting his father is expected.
 
2012-11-20 12:34:13 PM  
You have the right to believe what you want, but you do not have the right to be protected from the social consequences of having abhorrent beliefs. If we were talking about actors, screenwriters, etc., who were secretly Nazis, would you feel sorry for them being exposed as Nazis and having their careers ruined? You only feel sorry for them because either A) you sympathise with Communism, or B) they were the targets of right-wingers which you foolishly believe automatically makes them good people, or both. You should be honest and upfront about your psychology in this regard.
 
2012-11-20 12:49:23 PM  

B.L.Z. Bub: You have the right to believe what you want, but you do not have the right to be protected from the social consequences of having abhorrent beliefs. If we were talking about actors, screenwriters, etc., who were secretly Nazis, would you feel sorry for them being exposed as Nazis and having their careers ruined? You only feel sorry for them because either A) you sympathise with Communism, or B) they were the targets of right-wingers which you foolishly believe automatically makes them good people, or both. You should be honest and upfront about your psychology in this regard.


I do believe the 1950's blacklisting was later found to be illegal, according to our laws. Correct me if I'm wrong.
 
2012-11-20 12:53:45 PM  

Cythraul: B.L.Z. Bub: You have the right to believe what you want, but you do not have the right to be protected from the social consequences of having abhorrent beliefs. If we were talking about actors, screenwriters, etc., who were secretly Nazis, would you feel sorry for them being exposed as Nazis and having their careers ruined? You only feel sorry for them because either A) you sympathise with Communism, or B) they were the targets of right-wingers which you foolishly believe automatically makes them good people, or both. You should be honest and upfront about your psychology in this regard.

I do believe the 1950's blacklisting was later found to be illegal, according to our laws. Correct me if I'm wrong.


The majority of them were not actually communists.
 
2012-11-20 12:55:56 PM  

Freschel: Cythraul: B.L.Z. Bub: You have the right to believe what you want, but you do not have the right to be protected from the social consequences of having abhorrent beliefs. If we were talking about actors, screenwriters, etc., who were secretly Nazis, would you feel sorry for them being exposed as Nazis and having their careers ruined? You only feel sorry for them because either A) you sympathise with Communism, or B) they were the targets of right-wingers which you foolishly believe automatically makes them good people, or both. You should be honest and upfront about your psychology in this regard.

I do believe the 1950's blacklisting was later found to be illegal, according to our laws. Correct me if I'm wrong.

The majority of them were not actually communists.


Umm, interesting point. But I'm not sure what that has to do with whether or not the anti-communist blacklisting was illegal.
 
2012-11-20 01:05:23 PM  
I'm sure all those toddlers groped by the TSA will appreciate the apology delivered to their hospice.
 
2012-11-20 01:06:14 PM  

B.L.Z. Bub: You have the right to believe what you want, but you do not have the right to be protected from the social consequences of having abhorrent beliefs. If we were talking about actors, screenwriters, etc., who were secretly Nazis, would you feel sorry for them being exposed as Nazis and having their careers ruined? You only feel sorry for them because either A) you sympathise with Communism, or B) they were the targets of right-wingers which you foolishly believe automatically makes them good people, or both. You should be honest and upfront about your psychology in this regard.


Hey look a godwin, post ignored.
 
2012-11-20 01:07:28 PM  

steamingpile: Well if the unions wouldn't have courted the communist and socialist parties then none of the blacklist would have happened. But sean penn vilifying people who had nothing to do with blacklisting his father is expected.


HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAA...

i want to subscribe to your newsletter.
 
2012-11-20 01:09:14 PM  

B.L.Z. Bub: You have the right to believe what you want, but you do not have the right to be protected from the social consequences of having abhorrent beliefs. If we were talking about actors, screenwriters, etc., who were secretly Nazis, would you feel sorry for them being exposed as Nazis and having their careers ruined? You only feel sorry for them because either A) you sympathise with Communism, or B) they were the targets of right-wingers which you foolishly believe automatically makes them good people, or both. You should be honest and upfront about your psychology in this regard.


They weren't persecuted for their beliefs. They were persecuted for what other people falsely promulgated as their beliefs, sometimes out of ignorance and fear, and sometimes willfully as a deliberate tactic of political or social power. The blacklist was an early example of a political activity that the press today would call The War On X, where X is any topic that generates strong emotional responses and can be used to manipulate people.

The more you know...
 
2012-11-20 01:11:12 PM  

B.L.Z. Bub: having abhorrent beliefs


That's quite the assumption you made right there. Not everyone blacklisted was actually a commie, and not everyone thinks of communism as an "abhorrent belief". However, it seems at this time a majority of this United States thinks pretty low of Conservitives, so shall we march them all into the unemployment lines? Oh wait, that's what Obamacare is for, and the taxes... Must not break OpSec about the taxes...
 
2012-11-20 01:17:56 PM  

B.L.Z. Bub: You have the right to believe what you want, but you do not have the right to be protected from the social consequences of having abhorrent beliefs. If we were talking about actors, screenwriters, etc., who were secretly Nazis, would you feel sorry for them being exposed as Nazis and having their careers ruined? You only feel sorry for them because either A) you sympathise with Communism, or B) they were the targets of right-wingers which you foolishly believe automatically makes them good people, or both. You should be honest and upfront about your psychology in this regard.


you mean like..Disney? The Bush family? NASA? what kinda "NAZI" we talking about here Willis?

not only do you make a weak point, you use weak examples.

the Blacklist was more about power hungry witch hunters advancing political agendas. "Communism" was a secondary concern, seeing that those that admitted membership and outed other "commies" (whether they were actual communists or not) were allowed to work. So yeah.

Yup.

"here commie rat, go make some movies!"

when you guys and gals get on the fark and start yattering about ideologies and sociopolitical trends, keep in mind that 99% of it is a smoke screen for the uneducated masses.

To take your Godwinning a bit further, if we really hated the Krauts , NASA would have been built in Nuremberg as a labour camp, the Bush family would be bunkmates with Adolf Disney in Joliet and you'd be typing this out on your Xerox machine because IBM was nice enough to bring better killing through science to the Jews of Europe....

so...enjoy your history channel version of things...

rant over.
 
2012-11-20 01:25:05 PM  
does he include a map to his fathers grave so I can piss on it? If not...who cares.
 
2012-11-20 01:29:48 PM  
oi47.tinypic.com
 
2012-11-20 01:37:41 PM  
The blacklist also arguably gave us On the Waterfront, often interpreted as director Elia Kazan's defense of his decision to denounce eight Hollywood colleagues to HUAC.

In a supreme example of irony, the original screenplay that would eventually become On the Waterfront, a story called The Hook, was written by Kazan's long-time friend... Arthur Miller.

And to pile on the connections, Miller broke off his relation with Kazan over the latter's decision to testify, and Miller's conflicted feelings over that relationship are reflected in the tragic protagonist of A View From the Bridge... which in turn was inspired by a true story Miller had heard about, years earlier, when doing research for The Hook.
 
2012-11-20 02:35:27 PM  
Unavailable for comment:

georgetakei.com

/hotlinks, oh my
 
2012-11-20 02:36:07 PM  
Yeah, that laid some farking fantastic groundwork that we're totally not suffering from today.
 
2012-11-20 05:40:13 PM  
i49.tinypic.com

RIGHT ON
 
2012-11-20 05:40:49 PM  

cryinoutloud: This is a great idea, now that everyone who had their lives ruined by it is dead.


It's ok, the real witch hunts over in the Soviet Union from the 20s through the 50s certainly have everyone dead.
 
2012-11-20 07:00:05 PM  
Most in the blacklist were really communist spies and KGB agents, so that's ok.
 
2012-11-20 07:14:25 PM  

Haliburton Cummings: IN BEFORE THE LOCK!

the whole "cold war" was a waste of time, lives and ..well you name it...

watching those Yankee Doodle Dandies waving their Chinese made American flags out the window of their Korean trucks makes me howl..HOWL with laughter..

see, you can win over smart people with an idea...stupid people are won over by trinkets...

ENJOY AMERICUH


Not in the 1950s - most stuff was still made in America back then.

The cold war and war in general was inevitable due to the tribal nature of human beings. I'm not sure we will ever be entirely free of it.
 
2012-11-21 02:28:59 AM  

Cythraul: Freschel: Cythraul: B.L.Z. Bub: You have the right to believe what you want, but you do not have the right to be protected from the social consequences of having abhorrent beliefs. If we were talking about actors, screenwriters, etc., who were secretly Nazis, would you feel sorry for them being exposed as Nazis and having their careers ruined? You only feel sorry for them because either A) you sympathise with Communism, or B) they were the targets of right-wingers which you foolishly believe automatically makes them good people, or both. You should be honest and upfront about your psychology in this regard.

I do believe the 1950's blacklisting was later found to be illegal, according to our laws. Correct me if I'm wrong.

The majority of them were not actually communists.

Umm, interesting point. But I'm not sure what that has to do with whether or not the anti-communist blacklisting was illegal.


Sorry, that was meant for BLZ Bub.
 
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