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(Slate)   Say hello to our new neighbor: actual picture of a planet orbiting a nearby star   (slate.com) divider line 54
    More: Interesting, planets, planets orbiting, Subaru Telescope, reflected light, deuterium, light-years, failed star, hydrogen bombs  
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11626 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Nov 2012 at 1:18 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-19 01:26:04 PM
Hidy-ho, good neighbor.
 
2012-11-19 01:26:22 PM
Wow, planets actually orbit stars. Who knew?
 
2012-11-19 01:28:36 PM
When do we invade?
 
2012-11-19 01:30:02 PM
Hi there neighbor, can we borrow some sugar natural resources?
 
2012-11-19 01:30:41 PM
K, and?
 
2012-11-19 01:35:08 PM
The astronomers used the Japanese Subaru telescope in Hawaii...

Is it the WRX version of the telescope? Those are totally cool...
 
2012-11-19 01:41:28 PM
Reading that article made my head hurt. It was like reading what a meth-head thinks.
 
2012-11-19 01:42:51 PM
Snark aside, K And b is 13 times as massive as Jupiter, orbiting the star at a distance greater than Pluto at its farthest from the Sun. We've discovered worlds big and small. We've found them orbiting so close to a star they're being literally boiled away, and (possibly) more than double Pluto's farthest distance from the sun (Fomalhaut b). It could be because it's the only system we'd known until recently, but our system is starting to look very pedestrian.

Some "hard" sci-fi is aware of the potential (and now proven!) diversity of planetary systems, but I'm still waiting for pop sci-fi to catch up to this staggering wealth of creative material we've built up just from studying reality. I mean, the layperson's concept of a "cold world" is Hoth in The Empire Strikes Back. Basically Siberia. Titan is a moon in our own system that's far more alien than anything supposedly "creative" people dream up.
 
2012-11-19 01:43:53 PM

mark12A: The astronomers used the Japanese Subaru telescope in Hawaii...

Is it the WRX version of the telescope? Those are totally cool...


The EVO version is better...
 
2012-11-19 01:47:58 PM
The star, κ And, is bright enough to see with the naked eye.

Whose naked eye? I can see the moons of Jupiter without a telescope. Or is that what they mean?
 
2012-11-19 01:49:41 PM
Yo...Phil is blogging over on Slate these days. Who knew?
 
2012-11-19 01:57:43 PM
Do they have Jesus?
 
2012-11-19 01:58:16 PM

Nadie_AZ: The star, κ And, is bright enough to see with the naked eye.

Whose naked eye? I can see the moons of Jupiter without a telescope. Or is that what they mean?


'can't see'

I even previewed.
 
2012-11-19 02:23:26 PM

Stone Meadow: Yo...Phil is blogging over on Slate these days. Who knew?


He'd been talking about it on his old site for at least a week, so most people who follow him knew.

I used to read his site all the time, but I have to say: now that he's been making a big deal about his new tattoo, it's hard to take him seriously, anymore. There's something not quite right about a middle-aged man suddenly deciding to get a tattoo.
 
2012-11-19 02:25:28 PM

dragonchild: K, and?


B, apparently.
 
2012-11-19 02:28:00 PM
Meh, I usually wait 'til Fark points out something interesting he's blogging about before I go look.

Always worth it, tho, Phil...keep up the good work!

Oh, and when he adds a pony tail and a Harley, we'll know he's middle-aged. ;^)
 
2012-11-19 02:28:06 PM
Paging doglover: here's the proof you asked for, hope you can handle it! ;-)
 
2012-11-19 02:28:20 PM

Nadie_AZ: Nadie_AZ: The star, κ And, is bright enough to see with the naked eye.

Whose naked eye? I can see the moons of Jupiter without a telescope. Or is that what they mean?

'can't see'

I even previewed.


And I was just about to ask if Lasik surgery was *that* good?
 
2012-11-19 02:33:49 PM
k AND what?

WHAT?!
 
2012-11-19 02:34:00 PM

pudding7: K, and?

B, apparently.


Be apparently what?
 
2012-11-19 02:35:09 PM

Zombie DJ: k AND what?

WHAT?!


b, the planet.

/ it's what a Buddhist monk told me, anyway
 
2012-11-19 02:36:58 PM
I don't want to live on this planet anymore.

/I want to live on that one
 
2012-11-19 02:51:24 PM

Dadoo: Stone Meadow: Yo...Phil is blogging over on Slate these days. Who knew?

He'd been talking about it on his old site for at least a week, so most people who follow him knew.

I used to read his site all the time, but I have to say: now that he's been making a big deal about his new tattoo, it's hard to take him seriously, anymore. There's something not quite right about a middle-aged man suddenly deciding to get a tattoo.


Well, if he starts wearing a white suit, then I'd really start to worry.
 
2012-11-19 02:55:56 PM
www.2001exhibit.org
 
2012-11-19 03:35:47 PM
Damnit, I love space science. But its really damn hard to get excited by another pixellated yellow on an orange background computer image.
 
2012-11-19 03:47:11 PM

Nadie_AZ: Nadie_AZ: The star, κ And, is bright enough to see with the naked eye.

Whose naked eye? I can see the moons of Jupiter without a telescope. Or is that what they mean?

'can't see'

I even previewed.


Thanks for the correction. At first I thought I was reading the weirdest Internet tough guy post ever!
 
2012-11-19 04:09:27 PM
its a street light
 
2012-11-19 04:12:00 PM

Dadoo: Stone Meadow: Yo...Phil is blogging over on Slate these days. Who knew?

He'd been talking about it on his old site for at least a week, so most people who follow him knew.

I used to read his site all the time, but I have to say: now that he's been making a big deal about his new tattoo, it's hard to take him seriously, anymore. There's something not quite right about a middle-aged man suddenly deciding to get a tattoo.


At least it's not a corvette.
 
2012-11-19 04:14:19 PM
A Nibiru by any other name is still Nibiru.
 
2012-11-19 04:20:23 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-11-19 04:59:10 PM
Amazing - now what?
 
2012-11-19 05:07:37 PM

ColSanders: [www.2001exhibit.org image 480x200]


We need that with Nibiru instead of Europa.
 
2012-11-19 05:18:09 PM

EdNortonsTwin: Amazing - now what?


Now we destroy it.
 
2012-11-19 05:42:49 PM
The neighbors are a fraternity. Well that sucks.
Partying every night.
 
2012-11-19 05:52:10 PM
Betcha the Planet Owner's Association is full of idiots though.
 
2012-11-19 06:01:32 PM

dragonchild: Snark aside, K And b is 13 times as massive as Jupiter, orbiting the star at a distance greater than Pluto at its farthest from the Sun. We've discovered worlds big and small. We've found them orbiting so close to a star they're being literally boiled away, and (possibly) more than double Pluto's farthest distance from the sun (Fomalhaut b). It could be because it's the only system we'd known until recently, but our system is starting to look very pedestrian.

Some "hard" sci-fi is aware of the potential (and now proven!) diversity of planetary systems, but I'm still waiting for pop sci-fi to catch up to this staggering wealth of creative material we've built up just from studying reality. I mean, the layperson's concept of a "cold world" is Hoth in The Empire Strikes Back. Basically Siberia. Titan is a moon in our own system that's far more alien than anything supposedly "creative" people dream up.


My understanding is that the current systems can only detect "weird" planets that are sufficiently big, close, fast, or preferably all three. I've wondered what would happen if you used our current techniques on the solar system from say 50 light years out. Jupiter and Saturn seem like they would be too slow for Kepler to pick them up right away from their effect on the Sun.

As far as science fiction goes, you're mainly limited to planets that can support unprotected humans so that's a pretty small range.
 
2012-11-19 06:06:31 PM

ArkPanda: dragonchild: Snark aside, K And b is 13 times as massive as Jupiter, orbiting the star at a distance greater than Pluto at its farthest from the Sun. We've discovered worlds big and small. We've found them orbiting so close to a star they're being literally boiled away, and (possibly) more than double Pluto's farthest distance from the sun (Fomalhaut b). It could be because it's the only system we'd known until recently, but our system is starting to look very pedestrian.

Some "hard" sci-fi is aware of the potential (and now proven!) diversity of planetary systems, but I'm still waiting for pop sci-fi to catch up to this staggering wealth of creative material we've built up just from studying reality. I mean, the layperson's concept of a "cold world" is Hoth in The Empire Strikes Back. Basically Siberia. Titan is a moon in our own system that's far more alien than anything supposedly "creative" people dream up.

My understanding is that the current systems can only detect "weird" planets that are sufficiently big, close, fast, or preferably all three. I've wondered what would happen if you used our current techniques on the solar system from say 50 light years out. Jupiter and Saturn seem like they would be too slow for Kepler to pick them up right away from their effect on the Sun.

As far as science fiction goes, you're mainly limited to planets that can support unprotected humans so that's a pretty small range.


How about 'mission of gravity' by Hal Clement. (Grins at the camera) My favorite.
 
2012-11-19 06:47:56 PM

Tillmaster: ArkPanda: dragonchild: Snark aside, K And b is 13 times as massive as Jupiter, orbiting the star at a distance greater than Pluto at its farthest from the Sun. We've discovered worlds big and small. We've found them orbiting so close to a star they're being literally boiled away, and (possibly) more than double Pluto's farthest distance from the sun (Fomalhaut b). It could be because it's the only system we'd known until recently, but our system is starting to look very pedestrian.

Some "hard" sci-fi is aware of the potential (and now proven!) diversity of planetary systems, but I'm still waiting for pop sci-fi to catch up to this staggering wealth of creative material we've built up just from studying reality. I mean, the layperson's concept of a "cold world" is Hoth in The Empire Strikes Back. Basically Siberia. Titan is a moon in our own system that's far more alien than anything supposedly "creative" people dream up.

My understanding is that the current systems can only detect "weird" planets that are sufficiently big, close, fast, or preferably all three. I've wondered what would happen if you used our current techniques on the solar system from say 50 light years out. Jupiter and Saturn seem like they would be too slow for Kepler to pick them up right away from their effect on the Sun.

As far as science fiction goes, you're mainly limited to planets that can support unprotected humans so that's a pretty small range.

Haldeman's "The Forever War" featured a lot of combat on very cold planets, pools of liquid methane, etc.

How about 'mission of gravity' by Hal Clement. (Grins at the camera) My favorite.

 
2012-11-19 06:51:21 PM

ArkPanda: I've wondered what would happen if you used our current techniques on the solar system from say 50 light years out.


Jupiter dominates the planetary mass of our system, radiates a lot of heat and is so massive it doesn't revolve around the Sun so much as the two go around a central point (barycenter). It'd be a matter of when, but our current techniques would discover it -- probably several ways. While it would've been impossible just ten years ago, finding Jupiter from 50ly out would be relatively "easy" these days. I think we could eventually discover Saturn as well. Earth would be pushing it. The challenge there is picking up Earth's signal from the "noise" of four much more massive planets. I think we'd discover Venus first, if at all, as it's closer and comparable in mass.

I think all are either too "close" (Jupiter) or too cold and small (Saturn, Uranus, Neptune) to be discovered with direct imaging, so we'd most likely "find" them indirectly. Unfortunately it takes three revolutions to confirm the existence of a planet, but the biggest AND closest of the four -- Jupiter -- takes 12 years per round trip. So for many techniques it'd take over 36 years of constant observation just to detect Jupiter. All that said, if we spent the time and resources, I think it'd eventually happen. Neptune, however, would take 500 years of non-stop observation even if there's enough of a signal in the noise to detect it.

That's one thing I don't see publicly mentioned. I'm not sure how we'd get around it, but we really don't have any sort of technique that would discover a planet like Neptune orbiting another star. It's plenty big for a planet and honestly well within the Sun's Hill sphere, but too small to image and too far out to wait for it to finish its laps. Even among the stars we've surveyed, it's almost a certainty we're missing a LOT of stuff. If we observed our system from 50ly out, the best we can do is find 2-3, maybe four planets.
 
2012-11-19 06:58:29 PM

pudding7: dragonchild: K, and?

B, apparently.


K & B, aka kibble and bits, is a slang term for crack, which means the astronomers took a look at that and said "That's a farking huge rock, man!" 

/I doubt anyone actually says "kibble and bits" when they want crack, unless they just got some D.A.R.E. merch.
 
2012-11-19 07:11:31 PM
I doubt that planet will hang around very long. Did you see the size of that black hole it's orbiting in that picture? I mean it's already sucked in a plus sign. That planet has to be next.

/Seriously though, love reading stories like this
//Space...the final frontier
 
2012-11-19 07:17:22 PM
So.. Is it possible to detect the planet's moons if we observe the planet's position or luminance for a longer period?

That would be the logical next step, no? And maybe we could find that one of its moons is totally like our planet.
 
2012-11-19 07:52:51 PM
www.slate.com

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-11-19 07:57:21 PM

drumsac: [upload.wikimedia.org image 250x181]



w00t!

Let's party, cher!

kindofneworleanian.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-11-19 09:49:16 PM

EdNortonsTwin: Amazing - now what?


First we send the religious people over there to first try to buy and eventually slaughter the natives. Then we colonize, rape the women, enslave the wildlife, steal the resources and pave the remaining crap over.
 
2012-11-19 10:15:15 PM

Smeggy Smurf: EdNortonsTwin: Amazing - now what?

First we send the religious people over there to first try to buy and eventually slaughter the natives. Then we colonize, rape the women, enslave the wildlife, steal the resources and pave the remaining crap over.



If they don't beat us to it, that is.
 
2012-11-19 10:51:59 PM

Smeggy Smurf: EdNortonsTwin: Amazing - now what?

First we send the religious people over there to first try to buy and eventually slaughter the natives. Then we colonize, rape the women, enslave the wildlife, steal the resources and pave the remaining crap over.


Ah, the old number 6. Will we have a number 6 dance afterwards?
 
2012-11-19 11:03:41 PM
Subby, It is not new just because we didn't know it was there.
 
2012-11-19 11:16:17 PM

Smeggy Smurf: EdNortonsTwin: Amazing - now what?

First we send the religious people over there to first try to buy and eventually slaughter the natives. Then we colonize, rape the women, enslave the wildlife, steal the resources and pave the remaining crap over.


Sounds good. I'll get my keys.
 
2012-11-20 01:08:08 AM
www.nupxl.com 

Yes, I know the meme is years old, but it won't get to them until 2182AD anyway.
 
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