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(Salon)   Man says he was "addicted" to pot and now that he quit, he is "feeling weird" and that a chemical dependency is negatively impacting him   (salon.com ) divider line
    More: Dumbass, acquiescence  
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7901 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Nov 2012 at 11:04 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



208 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2012-11-19 09:53:48 AM  
I feel depressed and am not sure what to do with myself.

You were already depressed and you were escaping through drugs.

I used to work part time and would spend the rest of the time getting high and watching TV. Now that I am not getting high, I feel like my husband and I don't relate any more.

Maybe that's because after a year or two of marriage you both tuned each other out and began getting high and watching TV. Now that you're not getting high, you're noticing the deficiencies in your relationship. Again...you already had a problem that you were escaping through drugs.

during the 10 years that I was a pothead, I lost all of my friends because I would rather smoke than hang out with them.

In your times of trouble, instead of leaning on your friends, you turned to drugs.

Any advice would be welcome.

Stop blaming cannabis. You were in need of a life change and instead of doing it through positivity you chose drugs to fix it.
 
2012-11-19 10:13:26 AM  

jaylectricity: I feel depressed and am not sure what to do with myself.

You were already depressed and you were escaping through drugs.

I used to work part time and would spend the rest of the time getting high and watching TV. Now that I am not getting high, I feel like my husband and I don't relate any more.

Maybe that's because after a year or two of marriage you both tuned each other out and began getting high and watching TV. Now that you're not getting high, you're noticing the deficiencies in your relationship. Again...you already had a problem that you were escaping through drugs.

during the 10 years that I was a pothead, I lost all of my friends because I would rather smoke than hang out with them.

In your times of trouble, instead of leaning on your friends, you turned to drugs.

Any advice would be welcome.

Stop blaming cannabis. You were in need of a life change and instead of doing it through positivity you chose drugs to fix it.


Over in one. Good job.
 
2012-11-19 10:16:24 AM  

jaylectricity: I

Stop blaming cannabis. You were in need of a life change and instead of doing it through positivity you chose drugs to fix it.


Bravo
 
2012-11-19 10:37:45 AM  

jaylectricity: Stop blaming cannabis. You were in need of a life change and instead of doing it through positivity you chose drugs to fix it.


Yeah, pretty much this. Too often when anyone has problems with life and smokes pot, the pot gets blamed. If only they hadn't smoked pot their life would be peaches and cream (or unicorns and rainbows).

That's a crock of shiat. Pot doesn't screw up people's lives (and it doesn't lead to success either). There are a whole lot of other things which affect success or failure in life.
 
2012-11-19 10:46:35 AM  
I used to smoke a lot of pot, recreationally as I don't think I had anything really going wrong with my life. There is a period of depression when you quit, because the chemistry of your brain is altered slightly because of the mood elevation properties of THC. It's not necessarily masking already existing depression, it's simply that you are "used" to feeling that way at a certain time of day (after work in my case), and with that added boost gone the resulting sobriety feels lower and more down than you would otherwise feel. It is noticeable.

It's not necessarily addictive, to the extent that the withdrawal symptoms are weak as compared with a hard drug or even habitual drinking, but there certainly are symptoms that exist when you move from heavy smoking to infrequent or quitting altogether.

This person though, this was covered by jayelectricity.
 
2012-11-19 10:57:42 AM  
I'd just like to point out that the person who wrote this letter is a woman. Unless, you know, we're talking about a gay couple. Not that there's anything wrong that.
 
2012-11-19 11:05:48 AM  
I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool
 
2012-11-19 11:06:10 AM  
Have you ever sucked dick for weed, man?
 
2012-11-19 11:06:48 AM  
Over in one...
 
2012-11-19 11:09:18 AM  
Uh, what's the problem? Just start smoking again and everything goes back to normal. Duh.
 
2012-11-19 11:11:21 AM  
Which is why marijuana used to be known as Dope
 
2012-11-19 11:11:56 AM  
There's a major difference between psychological dependence and physical dependence.
 
2012-11-19 11:12:12 AM  
Extraneous quotation mark in headline quadfecta complete, quinfecta in play...
 
2012-11-19 11:12:38 AM  
She should take up drinking, then.
 
2012-11-19 11:12:39 AM  
Am i the only one that thinks the salon just got trolled by someone bored and stoned?
 
2012-11-19 11:12:58 AM  

Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool


Last week I decided to not smoke. Started on Monday, and by Thursday I actually remembered my first dream. Too bad it was a farking nightmare that terrified me (stupid ass clowns). Made me regret ever wanting to remember that crap.

/No withdrawal symptoms
 
2012-11-19 11:14:04 AM  

Clemkadidlefark: Which is why marijuana used to be known as Dope


Only moms called it dope. Everyone else knew dope was heroin.
 
2012-11-19 11:16:08 AM  
The meaning of the word 'Dope' in this context means 'cure-all,' dope!
 
2012-11-19 11:17:00 AM  

untaken_name: Uh, what's the problem? Just start smoking again and everything goes back to normal. Duh.


God, no shiat. The solution is right there in front of you. On the table. No, not the remote. The bong. All these problems and they're all fixed by that one little device. That one wonderful, maaaaagical device.

How can people be so blind to the most obvious solution?
 
2012-11-19 11:18:24 AM  
One last thing, Ex-Pothead:

Nobody likes a quitter.
 
2012-11-19 11:18:31 AM  

Elandriel: I used to smoke a lot of pot, recreationally as I don't think I had anything really going wrong with my life. There is a period of depression when you quit, because the chemistry of your brain is altered slightly because of the mood elevation properties of THC


I've quit smoking pot a few times - supply problems....when you're not in college anymore and you move to a new town you don't have all those connections you used to have. I can honestly say it made very little difference. Other than wishing I could get high I felt absolutely no withdrawal symptoms.

I could get pot right now - well, not right now, but I could get pot today if I really wanted (or "needed") it that bad (the people I could get it from have jobs and are at work right now), but I don't. It's not a miracle drug and I don't want to spend the money on it. It's not that I think pot is evil, I just don't see any benefit from me using it.

Well, not any benefit other than getting high for a couple of hours. If someone handed me a joint I'd gladly partake but I'm not going to go out of my way to get any pot.
 
2012-11-19 11:19:29 AM  

jaylectricity: I feel depressed and am not sure what to do with myself.

You were already depressed and you were escaping through drugs.

I used to work part time and would spend the rest of the time getting high and watching TV. Now that I am not getting high, I feel like my husband and I don't relate any more.

Maybe that's because after a year or two of marriage you both tuned each other out and began getting high and watching TV. Now that you're not getting high, you're noticing the deficiencies in your relationship. Again...you already had a problem that you were escaping through drugs.

during the 10 years that I was a pothead, I lost all of my friends because I would rather smoke than hang out with them.

In your times of trouble, instead of leaning on your friends, you turned to drugs.

Any advice would be welcome.

Stop blaming cannabis. You were in need of a life change and instead of doing it through positivity you chose drugs to fix it.


media.smashingmagazine.com

i've blamed Weed, WoW, and my Weight for my loneliness in the past. When i realized that real change comes from within, even if that change is admitting your old ways are hurting you and that you need help. 

Smoking significantly less since i have someone in my life instead of wasting my life trying to stay in the top 100,000s in Modern Warfare 3 (8 long angry months of unemployment) Now me and the lady friend enjoy a weekend of wine and weed every now and then.
 
2012-11-19 11:20:07 AM  

scottydoesntknow: stupid ass clowns


Were they no-talent, also?
 
2012-11-19 11:21:23 AM  
I smoked marijuana every day, several times a day, (up to 5 times) from age 17 to 22. One day I decided I was tired of being overweight from binge eating due to munchies and being sedentary. All I would do was smoke, eat a pint of ice cream and play video games. To be honest, it was great. But I can't do that for the rest of my life.

I quit cold turkey back in May of this year. I didn't suffer any adverse effects. Actually, every thing has been positive for me. I ended a bad relationship a girl who continues to smoke, I went from 205lbs to 171lbs and quit my dead end, minimum wage job and enlisted with the Air Force for 6 years. I plan to give them 20. I've been running and lifting every weekday too. But I need to cut this post short, I have to be at the gym in 26 minutes.
 
2012-11-19 11:22:31 AM  

speedycat: I quit cold turkey back in May of this year. I didn't suffer any adverse effects. Actually, every thing has been positive for me


Same thing with me.
 
2012-11-19 11:22:45 AM  
My opinion -- it's hormonal. Pot screws around with your estrogen levels. Look it up. Then go to a health food store and get some progesterone cream. Works like a charm.
 
2012-11-19 11:22:58 AM  
"Bro I feel all weird since I stopped smoking weed."

"That's called sober. You're sober right now. That feeling is probably why you started smoking."
 
2012-11-19 11:23:31 AM  

speedycat: I smoked marijuana every day, several times a day, (up to 5 times) from age 17 to 22. One day I decided I was tired of being overweight from binge eating due to munchies and being sedentary. All I would do was smoke, eat a pint of ice cream and play video games. To be honest, it was great. But I can't do that for the rest of my life.

I quit cold turkey back in May of this year. I didn't suffer any adverse effects. Actually, every thing has been positive for me. I ended a bad relationship a girl who continues to smoke, I went from 205lbs to 171lbs and quit my dead end, minimum wage job and enlisted with the Air Force for 6 years. I plan to give them 20. I've been running and lifting every weekday too. But I need to cut this post short, I have to be at the gym in 26 minutes.


You're still a quitter.
 
2012-11-19 11:23:36 AM  
Hey lady? It was pot, let it go. Sobriety is a hell of a drug. And it takes some getting used to.

What's worse than drugs? Having to talk to posers like the "author" of this article. On and on, writing a lot and saying nothing. She asked for advice, not a farking diatribe.

the "church of all of us who've been there" really?? STFU and drink this.

/10 years clean and I still hate ex-addicts. Stupid farking meetings and coffee and "truth" and feelings.
//great now I feel sick.
 
2012-11-19 11:23:50 AM  
fark off with your reefer madness bullshiat.
 
2012-11-19 11:23:55 AM  

Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool


How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?
 
2012-11-19 11:25:18 AM  
Yeah, I'm addicted to relaxing and having fun to.

/moderation is key
 
2012-11-19 11:25:49 AM  

Dr Dreidel: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?


Happened to me too
 
2012-11-19 11:26:17 AM  
When one ages, he has a little less need for cannabis. Withdrawal from any substance one has come to be dependent upon is going to be a little bit rough, in ways one will be aware of, and ones one may not. The retentivity of the substance is a factor. A long-term puffer will be able to get a little buzz by going for a long hike by getting some residue from his fat tissues. So withdrawal will be a little less difficult than from something polar-soluble. Cannabis is pretty warm stuff, so, yeah, someone who quits is gonna feel depersonalized and bereft. The brain tries to equilibrate from whatever suite of substances our imbiber chooses. When he quits, the pendulum is gonna swing the other way for awhile.
 
2012-11-19 11:26:25 AM  

Dr Dreidel: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?


Yes.
 
2012-11-19 11:26:37 AM  

Dr Dreidel: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?


Interesting. I thought it was just me. Though I did smoke yesterday and remember my dream from last night.
 
2012-11-19 11:27:06 AM  

Dr Dreidel: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?


Everyone I talks to has the same experience.
 
2012-11-19 11:27:10 AM  
Hogwash.

Marijuana is not physically addictive in the biochemical sense. Extremely heavy users may suffer some irratibility when it is withdrawn, but nothing like the sdymptoms which accompany withdrawal from narcotics, alcohol or niccotine.

What he is saying is, he is an attention whore, and so totally wrapped up in himself that he expects others to take him as seriously as he takes himself.

Fat chance.
 
2012-11-19 11:28:33 AM  

Dr Dreidel: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?


Yup. Lots of people talk about it, too. Quite a few primary literature papers on it in zee libraries. :)
 
2012-11-19 11:29:05 AM  
img4-2.cookinglight.timeinc.net
 
2012-11-19 11:30:40 AM  
Yeah, you don't get your deep-REM sleep if you smoke pot all of the time. Anything with an analgesic component is going to be missed by one's nervous system. The only recreational drugs that aren't addictive whatsoever are the hallucinogens. That's why there is next to zero social phenomenology associated with them.
 
2012-11-19 11:30:40 AM  
 
2012-11-19 11:31:37 AM  
Eat Pray Toke
 
2012-11-19 11:32:46 AM  
The problem with you young people is, you've never gone through menopause, so you don't know the symptoms of estrogen fluctuation. I'm completely serious about this. That weird feeling you feel is your hormones re-adjusting. It can take several months for them level out. Try the progesterone cream. It fixes the problem right away. (women only.)
 
2012-11-19 11:33:02 AM  

Dirtybird971: Hey lady? It was pot, let it go. Sobriety is a hell of a drug. And it takes some getting used to.

What's worse than drugs? Having to talk to posers like the "author" of this article. On and on, writing a lot and saying nothing. She asked for advice, not a farking diatribe.

the "church of all of us who've been there" really?? STFU and drink this.

/10 years clean and I still hate ex-addicts. Stupid farking meetings and coffee and "truth" and feelings.
//great now I feel sick.


So much THIS. There are no people holier than thou than ex addicts who wont freakin shut up about it.

I remember being at an after party and these 2 ex heroin users were banging on about how hard it was when they were farking over everyone they knew to get high and how being straight was so hard so I told them about this one time I was peaking on mushrooms and got a phone call to say my father had died from a heart attack and I had to drive to the family home in torrential rain and look at the corpse of my father laid out in the living room whilst all the time tripping on mushrooms.

They stopped banging on about how hard it was stealing from people and getting high.

assholes.
 
2012-11-19 11:33:21 AM  
That egg looks SO GOOD right now!

But I sooooo don't want to get up from my chair....
 
2012-11-19 11:34:09 AM  

SweetMama: The problem with you young people is, you've never gone through menopause, so you don't know the symptoms of estrogen fluctuation. I'm completely serious about this. That weird feeling you feel is your hormones re-adjusting. It can take several months for them level out. Try the progesterone cream. It fixes the problem right away. (women only.)


I put some on my balls. Should I not have done that?
 
2012-11-19 11:35:38 AM  
during the 10 years that I was a pothead, I lost all of my friends because I would rather smoke than hang out with them.

Wait. What? Why the hell weren't you smoking it up with your friends? You didn't have any friends that smoked weed? Well, there's your problem.
 
2012-11-19 11:37:06 AM  
Taking phone calls while tripping is something I stringently avoid. Though, Ms often give me an aloofness from tragedy.
 
2012-11-19 11:41:32 AM  
Remembering dreams ... yeah the novelty's all fun at first but then it becomes a nightmare.

/has awful dreams
 
2012-11-19 11:44:11 AM  
Depending on your definition of dependence/addiction, you could say it is indeed physically addictive. This is because you can administer cannabinoid recepter antagonists (marijuana is an agonist) and it will instantly put you into 'withdrawal'. This is a far cry from withdrawal from, say, heroin or morphine. But nevertheless it is a very minor physical withdrawal. The reason it is probably so minor is because of how long a half-life these cannabinoids have in the body, meaning it takes a long time for them to exit your body so it's gradual. This physical addiction is not seen with drugs like cocaine, which have no antagonist counterpart and will not put you into physical withdrawals, though the cessation will certainly make one believe they are physically withdrawing.

/just sayin' 
//if you're complaining about cessation from smoking marijuana you just need to stfu, or smoke some more.
 
2012-11-19 11:46:56 AM  
Well we are certainly seeing a major uptick on the "Evils of Pot" stories and TV spots since election day.

CNN had a spot, the local Fox affiliate has done "reports"

I guess the anti-pot crowd still has some propaganda to spread and some money to burn.
 
2012-11-19 11:47:50 AM  

kindms: Well we are certainly seeing a major uptick on the "Evils of Pot" stories and TV spots since election day.

CNN had a spot, the local Fox affiliate has done "reports"

I guess the anti-pot crowd still has some propaganda to spread and some money to burn.


That federal funding isn't going to spend itself now is it?
 
2012-11-19 11:48:16 AM  

Porous Horace: Remembering dreams ... yeah the novelty's all fun at first but then it becomes a nightmare.

/has awful dreams


I suffer from a general lack of melatonin in my brain at times of sleep and often experience night terrors. I often like to smoke on nights when my brain is too "active" before sleep because while my exhausted body may rest no one told my head it's pass out o'clock. When i was much heavier and unhappier i had lots of freak outs at night, and i never remembered them or my dreams in the first place (i remember a few here and there now).

When i started smoking (started at age 22, late bloomer) i discovered that actually helps me relax enough to slip peacefully into a deep REM . This is not always the case for people, sometimes it can make you too "aware" of being in bed and unable to slip to sleep, others go the opposite direction and it makes them more paranoid and unable to truly relax. Weed affects everyone differently - and is not the solution, but i would rather smoke than take a sleeping pill which has put me in 16 hour catatonic sleeps in the past.
 
2012-11-19 11:49:26 AM  
After around 10-12 years of smoking chronic, I have lost any and all paranoia that comes from it. I just enjoy being high like anyone else.

The thing is, I actually like being a little high at work now. I have plenty of meetings (and am more vocal when I smoke), lots of paperwork, and have a generally similar job to 90% of the people who sit behind a desk for 8 hours a day. I honestly feel like I get much more done, and at a much more quality level, when I'm a little bit stoned. If I was going to be paranoid about anything, it would be being high at work and not working, and this actually makes me work harder. I don't get so high that my eyes are bloodshot and I can't even move. Just a little bit to make the day go by a little bit better. I even got a promotion the other day, so it's not like it's not working for me....

I really feel like I wouldn't be doing this if I didn't think it was true. I'm not an idiot. But I've told this to many of my friends, and none of them have felt the same way at all.

The only thing I can't do at all when I smoke is play sports. Being "fully functional" is better because making split second decisions is more natural, and the half-second delay when I'm high is enough to make me suck at whatever I'm playing.

/Just like alcohol or any other drug, it's different for everyone
 
2012-11-19 11:51:11 AM  
When Im bored or depressed I like to can vegetables from my garden
i26.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-19 11:51:48 AM  
"I feel weird"

Thats the feeling of wastng 10 years, ya coont.
 
2012-11-19 11:54:30 AM  

SweetMama: The problem with you young people is, you've never gone through menopause, so you don't know the symptoms of estrogen fluctuation. I'm completely serious about this. That weird feeling you feel is your hormones re-adjusting. It can take several months for them level out. Try the progesterone cream. It fixes the problem right away. (women only.)


Thank you! When I'm running low I do feel a little psycho, it's shocking. I just figured I was pmsing or just being irrational like most women are. Will definitely get some. Used to have a 'when in Rome' attitude until someone spiked their bowl with heroin. That was many moons ago, but I still shudder thinking about it. :)
 
2012-11-19 11:55:14 AM  

speedycat: I smoked marijuana every day, several times a day, (up to 5 times) from age 17 to 22. One day I decided I was tired of being overweight from binge eating due to munchies and being sedentary. All I would do was smoke, eat a pint of ice cream and play video games. To be honest, it was great. But I can't do that for the rest of my life.

I quit cold turkey back in May of this year. I didn't suffer any adverse effects. Actually, every thing has been positive for me. I ended a bad relationship a girl who continues to smoke, I went from 205lbs to 171lbs and quit my dead end, minimum wage job and enlisted with the Air Force for 6 years. I plan to give them 20. I've been running and lifting every weekday too. But I need to cut this post short, I have to be at the gym in 26 minutes.


Can we all please move away from the cliche that pot = munchies = fat bodies ?

If you made all the changes you described and still kept smoking, you would have STILL lost the weight! Magic, i know, right?!

For real, this is the one thing that signals to me that the person talking ISN'T a pothead and doesn't know what they're talking about.

I smoke more than your average pothead and I'm in great shape (half marathon in under 2 hrs this weekend). Not to mention that beyond that my life isn't a warmed-up pile of crap... its pretty spiffy.
 
2012-11-19 11:56:26 AM  

jfivealive: Am i the only one that thinks the salon just got trolled by someone bored and stoned?


You mean the original letter writer, or the response, which I think read like a guy really ripped. Read like one of my essays in college when I was ripped to the bejesus belt...

Some people get high and DO things, some get high and do nothing, depends on the person and the weed it seems.
 
2012-11-19 11:56:44 AM  
See, when women complain about weird feelings, and people tell them it's all in their head, and nobody takes them seriously, it's totally unfair, because this is a legitimate medical problem with a simple solution. It doesn't help to tell women to just change their attitude and act right. That's totally insensitive!

Estrogen fluctuations make you feel weird. It can make your skin crawl. It affects your energy levels. It affects your thoughts and dreams. It affects a whole bunch of things. Fluctuating hormone levels can make your life miserable.

Long-term marijuana use means your hormones have stabilized at one level, and when you go off the marijuana, it takes a while for things to stabilize again. In between, you have all these crazy fluctuations that can make your life miserable. I'm speaking from personal experience. This is a problem that is easily solved, if you take the right approach.

I think this woman is not getting the help she needs.
 
2012-11-19 11:56:46 AM  

SmellsLikePoo: speedycat: I smoked marijuana every day, several times a day, (up to 5 times) from age 17 to 22. One day I decided I was tired of being overweight from binge eating due to munchies and being sedentary. All I would do was smoke, eat a pint of ice cream and play video games. To be honest, it was great. But I can't do that for the rest of my life.

I quit cold turkey back in May of this year. I didn't suffer any adverse effects. Actually, every thing has been positive for me. I ended a bad relationship a girl who continues to smoke, I went from 205lbs to 171lbs and quit my dead end, minimum wage job and enlisted with the Air Force for 6 years. I plan to give them 20. I've been running and lifting every weekday too. But I need to cut this post short, I have to be at the gym in 26 minutes.

Can we all please move away from the cliche that pot = munchies = fat bodies ?

If you made all the changes you described and still kept smoking, you would have STILL lost the weight! Magic, i know, right?!

For real, this is the one thing that signals to me that the person talking ISN'T a pothead and doesn't know what they're talking about.

I smoke more than your average pothead and I'm in great shape (half marathon in under 2 hrs this weekend). Not to mention that beyond that my life isn't a warmed-up pile of crap... its pretty spiffy.


Also, Colorado is the thinnest state in the nation and we legalized weed.
 
2012-11-19 11:57:33 AM  
Dear ex pot smoker,

The real world doesn't care how you feel whether you are high or not. Stop blaming your problems on a drug and deal with it.

Sincerely,
People who still have friends and job because they realize this fact.

/This applies to weed, alcohol, romantic relationships, home repair, operating heavy machinery, and basically living your life.
 
2012-11-19 11:57:35 AM  

dready zim: Dirtybird971: Hey lady? It was pot, let it go. Sobriety is a hell of a drug. And it takes some getting used to.

What's worse than drugs? Having to talk to posers like the "author" of this article. On and on, writing a lot and saying nothing. She asked for advice, not a farking diatribe.

the "church of all of us who've been there" really?? STFU and drink this.

/10 years clean and I still hate ex-addicts. Stupid farking meetings and coffee and "truth" and feelings.
//great now I feel sick.

So much THIS. There are no people holier than thou than ex addicts who wont freakin shut up about it.

I remember being at an after party and these 2 ex heroin users were banging on about how hard it was when they were farking over everyone they knew to get high and how being straight was so hard so I told them about this one time I was peaking on mushrooms and got a phone call to say my father had died from a heart attack and I had to drive to the family home in torrential rain and look at the corpse of my father laid out in the living room whilst all the time tripping on mushrooms.

They stopped banging on about how hard it was stealing from people and getting high.

assholes.


I've got friends who are ex addicts. Having talked to them quite a bit about it in the past, it was a lot harder than you might think. I mean, imagine this.

You wake up and feel like hell. You've woken up and felt like hell every morning for a year now. Imagine (for you and I) waking up after a night of drinking, where you don't quite have a hangover, but you don't feel good either. The kind of 'blah' that isn't going to be solved by an Alka Seltzer and greasy breakfast. But you do know something that can fix it. Even though you're reaching for your kit, you still feel low just for doing so. No matter how you talk about it to your friends, you still feel that it is somehow wrong, but you still do it. But look, your kit is empty. You've used it all. Or maybe someone else used it. You've got a few hours before withdrawals start and you feel like absolute hell. No money, no drugs, and you can't even complain about either because no one (except other broke junkies) will have sympathy for you. Even if you went to the ER, they'd probably just turn you away.

The craving is kicking in. It is stronger than anything that most regular people have experienced. You'd walk barefoot through a mile of broken glass and those little legos strewn about a scorching blacktop parking lot for even a third of a hit. This part is the big disconnect. This is what people don't understand when they say, 'well just stop taking it!' To tell someone that is like telling a regular person, 'well just stop eating! no, really, altogether! forever!' as advice for how they can lose weight, and being completely serious about it. Opiates will be put up there along beside other basal drives, like the drive for food, drive for sex, drive for shelter, etc, only it is usually in front of the rest.

So yeah, it is harder than people think to be a junkie. I mean you or I could probably come up with a $20 in fairly short notice in an emergency, but what if you were tasked with coming up with one yourself and just didn't have the funds? You can't borrow it, junkies have no credit. Working for it will take at least a week or two. You could go do odd jobs, but people see your track marks and will turn you away. You don't have a choice. You need that $20. Your options are to rip someone off or to pawn possessions. Pawning possessions will only work for so long...

This is the day to day life of your average junkie. Every day the question is posed again, and every day the world adapts a little more to make it harder for you to get that $20 that you need or you're going to go downhill fast.

I'm not excusing junkie behavior, just telling it like it is. It isn't all just never paying friends back or hawking stolen wares while you live a life of drug-addled luxury in a cozy apartment with running water, heat, air conditioning, and a bed to sleep on. It isn't easy by any means, but it is easier than getting off the horse and onto the wagon.
 
2012-11-19 12:00:05 PM  

jaylectricity: You were in need of a life change and instead of doing it through positivity you chose drugs to fix it.


In my experience, most people do.

jaylectricity: Stop blaming cannabis.


Cannabis gets hurt feelings when you speak so.
 
2012-11-19 12:00:27 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: I smoke more than your average pothead and I'm in great shape (half marathon in under 2 hrs this weekend). Not to mention that beyond that my life isn't a warmed-up pile of crap... its pretty spiffy.


The difference between escapism and enjoyment. Like the difference between a bar regular who has his fifth before I'm done with dinner and the guy who comes in for a beer with his MNF burger.

// also, everyone reading - go listen to the Jimmie's Chicken Shack song "Strange"
 
2012-11-19 12:01:52 PM  

homarjr: The only thing I can't do at all when I smoke is play sports. Being "fully functional" is better because making split second decisions is more natural, and the half-second delay when I'm high is enough to make me suck at whatever I'm playing.

/Just like alcohol or any other drug, it's different for everyone


I was a pitcher in college and had a tradition of smoking before every home game I started. I found a lot easier to get into the "zone" when I was baked, not to mention it was just fun. I could really block everything out and focus on the catcher's glove. It was a fun 4 years. My sophomore year, I also ate 2 hits of acid about an hour before game time. Hardest I ever threw was that day (93mph). Weeeeee!
 
2012-11-19 12:02:03 PM  

signaljammer: Taking phone calls while tripping is something I stringently avoid. Though, Ms often give me an aloofness from tragedy.


Twas the case with me, I got a sort of universal `cycle of life` thing going on so it wasn`t so bad. Don`t like answering phones now though.
 
2012-11-19 12:03:58 PM  
I was a fairly regular smoker, as were a lot of my co- workers. I think the whole " pot makes you lazy" thing is on over generalization...I would like to smoke before any task which would require large amounts of physical exertion, it seemed to give me a useable nervous energy and quiet the mind a bit allowing me to focus on breathing/moving efficiently....was putting in 10 to 12 hour days at 8000 to 11000 feet, moving 5 plus miles through snow. The slight paranoia also would help make for generally safer calls on route finding.
Now that I've stopped I've gained weight, and gotten a bit lazy......CSB out!
 
2012-11-19 12:04:14 PM  

homarjr: After around 10-12 years of smoking chronic, I have lost any and all paranoia that comes from it. I just enjoy being high like anyone else.

The thing is, I actually like being a little high at work now. I have plenty of meetings (and am more vocal when I smoke), lots of paperwork, and have a generally similar job to 90% of the people who sit behind a desk for 8 hours a day. I honestly feel like I get much more done, and at a much more quality level, when I'm a little bit stoned. If I was going to be paranoid about anything, it would be being high at work and not working, and this actually makes me work harder. I don't get so high that my eyes are bloodshot and I can't even move. Just a little bit to make the day go by a little bit better. I even got a promotion the other day, so it's not like it's not working for me....

I really feel like I wouldn't be doing this if I didn't think it was true. I'm not an idiot. But I've told this to many of my friends, and none of them have felt the same way at all.

The only thing I can't do at all when I smoke is play sports. Being "fully functional" is better because making split second decisions is more natural, and the half-second delay when I'm high is enough to make me suck at whatever I'm playing.

/Just like alcohol or any other drug, it's different for everyone


This is called self medication. People with ADD/ADHD were much more likely than regular people to be addicted to some kind of stimulant. Namely, caffeine, nicotine, amphetamines, cocaine, etc. They found a lot more benefit than the average person did...in that it helped with their ADD/ADHD. People with depression tend to self medicate with alcohol, benzos (like Xanax), and opiates (like heroin). You sound like you might have some kind of slight anxiety problem....a lot of people with the same kind of problem will self medicate with benzos or pot.

Self medication is all fine and dandy, but you might be able to get the same benefit with a prescribed medication if you ever have to stop smoking for whatever reason. Isn't so much the case when talking about weed, but often times the prescribed medication is a lot safer for you...drinking a couple of energy drinks a day is a lot worse on your body than some Adderall (taken when needed, not three times a day every day for the rest of your life). Anti-depressant pharms are a lot better for people than chronic alcoholism or benzo or opiate addiction.
 
2012-11-19 12:06:11 PM  

Happy Hours: ...their life would be peaches and cream (or unicorns and rainbows).


Dude, there are better ways to get your TwiDash fix than pot.

/Or Rarity. I guess.
//Whatever floats your boat
 
2012-11-19 12:06:57 PM  

Clemkadidlefark: Which is why marijuana used to be known as Dope


It never was, actually
 
2012-11-19 12:07:22 PM  

ficklefkrfark: I was a fairly regular smoker, as were a lot of my co- workers. I think the whole " pot makes you lazy" thing is on over generalization...I would like to smoke before any task which would require large amounts of physical exertion, it seemed to give me a useable nervous energy and quiet the mind a bit allowing me to focus on breathing/moving efficiently....was putting in 10 to 12 hour days at 8000 to 11000 feet, moving 5 plus miles through snow. The slight paranoia also would help make for generally safer calls on route finding.
Now that I've stopped I've gained weight, and gotten a bit lazy......CSB out!


What do you do for a living... are you the avalanche canon guy or something?
 
2012-11-19 12:08:39 PM  

joonyer: My sophomore year, I also ate 2 hits of acid about an hour before game time. Hardest I ever threw was that day (93mph). Weeeeee!


cardboardgods.files.wordpress.com

Would be proud if he weren't so focused on why the field keeps changing colors
 
2012-11-19 12:08:57 PM  

Dr Dreidel: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?


It happened to me...for about two weeks after I quit my dreams were freaking awesome. I'd close my eyes and start dreaming almost IMMEDIATELY. It made sleeping in so much more fun (than usual).
 
2012-11-19 12:10:32 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: speedycat: I smoked marijuana every day, several times a day, (up to 5 times) from age 17 to 22. One day I decided I was tired of being overweight from binge eating due to munchies and being sedentary. All I would do was smoke, eat a pint of ice cream and play video games. To be honest, it was great. But I can't do that for the rest of my life.

I quit cold turkey back in May of this year. I didn't suffer any adverse effects. Actually, every thing has been positive for me. I ended a bad relationship a girl who continues to smoke, I went from 205lbs to 171lbs and quit my dead end, minimum wage job and enlisted with the Air Force for 6 years. I plan to give them 20. I've been running and lifting every weekday too. But I need to cut this post short, I have to be at the gym in 26 minutes.

Can we all please move away from the cliche that pot = munchies = fat bodies ?

If you made all the changes you described and still kept smoking, you would have STILL lost the weight! Magic, i know, right?!

For real, this is the one thing that signals to me that the person talking ISN'T a pothead and doesn't know what they're talking about.

I smoke more than your average pothead and I'm in great shape (half marathon in under 2 hrs this weekend). Not to mention that beyond that my life isn't a warmed-up pile of crap... its pretty spiffy.


For some people pot = munchies = fat bodies. YMMV
 
2012-11-19 12:10:52 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

Last week I decided to not smoke. Started on Monday, and by Thursday I actually remembered my first dream. Too bad it was a farking nightmare that terrified me (stupid ass clowns). Made me regret ever wanting to remember that crap.

/No withdrawal symptoms


I quit smoking about 4 months ago after smoking heavily for 30+ years and that's the worst part of quitting. I didn't have any withdrawals to speak of but I swear to god I haven't had a decent nights sleep yet because of the dreams. And i mean every damn night. Only a couple of "bad" dreams but it realy doesn't matter when I'm more tired when I wake up than I was when I went to bed. I'm considering going to a doctor to see if he can give me some sleeping pills to help me out. Not sure what else to do really but I'm happy I finally gave up marijuana. And it took my little granddaughter to make me finally stop. I didn't want her growing up and calling her granddad a pothead. I love her too much to let that happen.
 
2012-11-19 12:12:50 PM  
jaylectricity:


And we're done here

/Quit smoking about a month ago, simply because the ritual of smoking was becoming more important then the effects.
//Feels just fine. Better if anything.
///Not giving it up, just need to find a better way of moderating myself thereby saving a bunch of money
////was lazy before weed.
 
2012-11-19 12:15:44 PM  

Hrist: This is called self medication. People with ADD/ADHD were much more likely than regular people to be addicted to some kind of stimulant. Namely, caffeine, nicotine, amphetamines, cocaine, etc. They found a lot more benefit than the average person did...in that it helped with their ADD/ADHD. People with depression tend to self medicate with alcohol, benzos (like Xanax), and opiates (like heroin). You sound like you might have some kind of slight anxiety problem....a lot of people with the same kind of problem will self medicate with benzos or pot.


Met plenty of ADD people self-medicating with depressants. Went to private school where most kids had either that or some sort of discipline issues. Many self-medicated, but I don't recall it being nearly so... "well-planned".

If there's studies that have been done proving this notion, I'd love to see them. If not, I think this is just wishful thinking.

Hrist: Self medication is all fine and dandy


Not really. In part because-unlike what you just said above- most people aren't doctors (though I've heard that pill-popping is probably most prevalent among medical professionals- largely due to access), often don't have the faintest clue what chemicals do what , what they themselves need, and very often just end up "self-medicating" on whatever tickles them the best.

Fun: still a valid reason for doing drugs, even if you do have some sort of disorder or other chemical deficiency.

Sometimes it might be the "right" choice, and sometimes it might not be. In the latter case, there's my wife's half-brother who has chosen pot as his "self-medication" of preference.

Problem: he very likely suffers from an as-yet-undiagnosed form of schizophrenia, and most medical studies done on this topic will agree that pot smoking exacerbates this particular condition.

I can't say it's done him a lot of good, in any case. Moral of the story being: while doctors are certainly far from perfect, and may not be doing the best things for you at all times, you aren't a doctor either, and they know a hell of a lot more than you. Don't try and be your own doctor.
 
2012-11-19 12:16:05 PM  

fluffy2097: jaylectricity:


And we're done here

/Quit smoking about a month ago, simply because the ritual of smoking was becoming more important then the effects.
//Feels just fine. Better if anything.
///Not giving it up, just need to find a better way of moderating myself thereby saving a bunch of money
////was lazy before weed
.


Heh, that was my main reason for not smoking at all last week. Just wanted to reassure myself that I could stop anytime and not worry. And it was kinda nice seeing that extra cash in my account.
 
2012-11-19 12:17:26 PM  
I was tripping while babysitting when I was young, mom went to work, I was with this girl in the living room, and honestly don't recall mom saying she was going to work and leaving the kids. Mom was (is) a psychopath who dumped her kids wherever she could. I was unaware that I was babysitting. Mom was probably in a snit I was hangin' with another girl

Younger son emerges from the bedroom sans sangarre. His brother declares that he is choking on an over-large piece of steak. He is looking at me, can't talk, saying with his eyes that he forgives me if he dies.
My fingernails, for some odd reason grow really, really fast and need to be clipped daily. They were longish. "F___ that," I think, and pull the steak out of his throat, probably scratching it in a few places on the way in. He went back to his room, fine then.

I was on, like, 50mg, really in another place. Wow.
 
2012-11-19 12:20:44 PM  

Hrist: homarjr: After around 10-12 years of smoking chronic, I have lost any and all paranoia that comes from it. I just enjoy being high like anyone else.

The thing is, I actually like being a little high at work now. I have plenty of meetings (and am more vocal when I smoke), lots of paperwork, and have a generally similar job to 90% of the people who sit behind a desk for 8 hours a day. I honestly feel like I get much more done, and at a much more quality level, when I'm a little bit stoned. If I was going to be paranoid about anything, it would be being high at work and not working, and this actually makes me work harder. I don't get so high that my eyes are bloodshot and I can't even move. Just a little bit to make the day go by a little bit better. I even got a promotion the other day, so it's not like it's not working for me....

I really feel like I wouldn't be doing this if I didn't think it was true. I'm not an idiot. But I've told this to many of my friends, and none of them have felt the same way at all.

The only thing I can't do at all when I smoke is play sports. Being "fully functional" is better because making split second decisions is more natural, and the half-second delay when I'm high is enough to make me suck at whatever I'm playing.

/Just like alcohol or any other drug, it's different for everyone

This is called self medication. People with ADD/ADHD were much more likely than regular people to be addicted to some kind of stimulant. Namely, caffeine, nicotine, amphetamines, cocaine, etc. They found a lot more benefit than the average person did...in that it helped with their ADD/ADHD. People with depression tend to self medicate with alcohol, benzos (like Xanax), and opiates (like heroin). You sound like you might have some kind of slight anxiety problem....a lot of people with the same kind of problem will self medicate with benzos or pot.

Self medication is all fine and dandy, but you might be able to get the same benefit with a prescribed medication if you ever have to stop smoking for whatever reason. Isn't so much the case when talking about weed, but often times the prescribed medication is a lot safer for you...drinking a couple of energy drinks a day is a lot worse on your body than some Adderall (taken when needed, not three times a day every day for the rest of your life). Anti-depressant pharms are a lot better for people than chronic alcoholism or benzo or opiate addiction.


My ADHD medicine worked but would irritate my stomach, dehydrate me faster, and make me irritable....a few hits of pot would give similar results without the previously mentioned side effects
 
2012-11-19 12:24:01 PM  

wildcardjack: There's a major difference between psychological dependence and physical dependence.


Marijuana causes neurons to dump serotonin; this is a significant part of the high. (SSRI anti-depressants work by preventing serotonin from being taken back into the neurons.)

When you change the chemical balance like that through an external factor, the neurons do their best to adapt to the new environment. Which is to say if you are a heavy smoker and quit cold turkey, your serotonin levels will be screwed up for some time.

This is pretty much the definition of physical dependence.
 
2012-11-19 12:24:39 PM  
Hrist
Dirtybird971:

/10 years clean and I still hate ex-addicts.

So much THIS. There are no people holier than thou than ex addicts who wont freakin shut up about it.

I remember being at an after party and these 2 ex heroin users were banging on about how hard it was when they were farking over everyone they knew to get high and how being straight was so hard so I told them about this one time I was peaking on mushrooms and got a phone call to say my father had died from a heart attack and I had to drive to the family home in torrential rain and look at the corpse of my father laid out in the living room whilst all the time tripping on mushrooms.

They stopped banging on about how hard it was stealing from people and getting high.

assholes.

I've got friends who are ex addicts. Having talked to them quite a bit about it in the past, it was a lot harder than you might think. I mean, imagine this.

You wake up and feel like hell. You've woken up and felt like hell every morning for a year now. Imagine (for you and I) waking up after a night of drinking, where you don't quite have a hangover, but you don't feel good either. The kind of 'blah' that isn't going to be solved by an Alka Seltzer and greasy breakfast. But you do know something that can fix it. Even though you're reaching for your kit, you still feel low just for doing so. No matter how you talk about it to your friends, you still feel that it is somehow wrong, but you still do it. But look, your kit is empty. You've used it all. Or maybe someone else used it. You've got a few hours before withdrawals start and you feel like absolute hell. No money, no drugs, and you can't even complain about either because no one (except other broke junkies) will have sympathy for you. Even if you went to the ER, they'd probably just turn you away.

The craving is kicking in. It is stronger than anything that most regular people have experienced. You'd walk barefoot through a mile of broken glass and those little legos strewn about a scorching blacktop parking lot for even a third of a hit. This part is the big disconnect. This is what people don't understand when they say, 'well just stop taking it!' To tell someone that is like telling a regular person, 'well just stop eating! no, really, altogether! forever!' as advice for how they can lose weight, and being completely serious about it. Opiates will be put up there along beside other basal drives, like the drive for food, drive for sex, drive for shelter, etc, only it is usually in front of the rest.

So yeah, it is harder than people think to be a junkie. I mean you or I could probably come up with a $20 in fairly short notice in an emergency, but what if you were tasked with coming up with one yourself and just didn't have the funds? You can't borrow it, junkies have no credit. Working for it will take at least a week or two. You could go do odd jobs, but people see your track marks and will turn you away. You don't have a choice. You need that $20. Your options are to rip someone off or to pawn possessions. Pawning possessions will only work for so long...

This is the day to day life of your average junkie. Every day the question is posed again, and every day the world adapts a little more to make it harder for you to get that $20 that you need or you're going to go downhill fast.

I'm not excusing junkie behavior, just telling it like it is. It isn't all just never paying friends back or hawking stolen wares while you live a life of drug-addled luxury in a cozy apartment with running water, heat, air conditioning, and a bed to sleep on. It isn't easy by any means, but it is easier than getting off the horse and onto the wagon.


I don't have to imagine it. I lived it for nearly a decade. And it's still just an excuse. nearly everyday during that time I KNEW IT WAS ME DOING IT TO MYSELF. I'm not saying it wasn't tough, most people don't live through it, but EVERYDAY there was a moment of clarity when I said, "you know you don't have to do this" but i did anyway. I was forsaking all other things to the point of losing 45 lbs, being homeless for 2 years and living in a bathroom of a gas station. I still had a job waitering, so I didn't have to resort to crime or prostitution, but it wasn't easy. However, I choose to continue and everyone has a choice. Had i been there when they started to whine I'd say the same to them. Like my mom used to say "you made your bed, now lie in it."
 
2012-11-19 12:27:08 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: ficklefkrfark: I was a fairly regular smoker, as were a lot of my co- workers. I think the whole " pot makes you lazy" thing is on over generalization...I would like to smoke before any task which would require large amounts of physical exertion, it seemed to give me a useable nervous energy and quiet the mind a bit allowing me to focus on breathing/moving efficiently....was putting in 10 to 12 hour days at 8000 to 11000 feet, moving 5 plus miles through snow. The slight paranoia also would help make for generally safer calls on route finding.
Now that I've stopped I've gained weight, and gotten a bit lazy......CSB out!

What do you do for a living... are you the avalanche canon guy or something?


Mt operations/patrol...opened the mountain in the mornings...skied it and all the side country all day....lots of hike to terrain, traverses, and moving things around (snow, equipment, people)
 
2012-11-19 12:28:09 PM  
I smoked every day up to 5 or 6 times a day from age 19-24. When it came time to advance my career I spent an enormous amount of time researching companies that did not drug test. I found this quite silly so I decided to finally quit. I was pretty irritable the first three or four days but that went away. The hardest part is thinking in your mind you are supposed to feel a certain way at certain times of a day. I don't think my body did not feel any sort of physical cravings.

So yeah, refer to Boobies. Thread ended there.

/With things trending towards legalizing will I smoke again?
//Probably
///Wonders how legalization in certain states is going to impact drug testing. If you test positive for THC will "I smoked in Colorado." fly an excuse?
 
2012-11-19 12:28:18 PM  
Im sure Fark will be completely unbiased with it's large age16-24 male pot smoker demographic.
 
2012-11-19 12:28:35 PM  


Hrist


dready zim: Dirtybird971:

I've got friends who are ex addicts. Having talked to them quite a bit about it in the past, it was a lot harder than you might think. I mean, imagine this.

You wake up and feel like hell. You've woken up and felt like hell every morning for a year now. Imagine (for you and I) waking up after a night of drinking, where you don't quite have a hangover, but you don't feel good either. The kind of 'blah' that isn't going to be solved by an Alka Seltzer and greasy breakfast. But you do know something that can fix it. Even though you're reaching for your kit, you still feel low just for doing so. No matter how you talk about it to your friends, you still feel that it is somehow wrong, but you still do it. But look, your kit is empty. You've used it all. Or maybe someone else used it. You've got a few hours before withdrawals start and you feel like absolute hell. No money, no drugs, and you can't even complain about either because no one (except other broke junkies) will have sympathy for you. Even if you went to the ER, they'd probably just turn you away.

The craving is kicking in. It is stronger than anything that most regular people have experienced. You'd walk barefoot through a mile of broken glass and those little legos strewn about a scorching blacktop parking lot for even a third of a hit. This part is the big disconnect. This is what people don't understand when they say, 'well just stop taking it!' To tell someone that is like telling a regular person, 'well just stop eating! no, really, altogether! forever!' as advice for how they can lose weight, and being completely serious about it. Opiates will be put up there along beside other basal drives, like the drive for food, drive for sex, drive for shelter, etc, only it is usually in front of the rest.

So yeah, it is harder than people think to be a junkie. I mean you or I could probably come up with a $20 in fairly short notice in an emergency, but what if you were tasked with coming up with one yourself and just didn't have the funds? You can't borrow it, junkies have no credit. Working for it will take at least a week or two. You could go do odd jobs, but people see your track marks and will turn you away. You don't have a choice. You need that $20. Your options are to rip someone off or to pawn possessions. Pawning possessions will only work for so long...

This is the day to day life of your average junkie. Every day the question is posed again, and every day the world adapts a little more to make it harder for you to get that $20 that you need or you're going to go downhill fast.

I'm not excusing junkie behavior, just telling it like it is. It isn't all just never paying friends back or hawking stolen wares while you live a life of drug-addled luxury in a cozy apartment with running water, heat, air conditioning, and a bed to sleep on. It isn't easy by any means, but it is easier than getting off the horse and onto the wagon.



I don't have to imagine it. I lived it for nearly a decade. And it's still just an excuse. nearly everyday during that time I KNEW IT WAS ME DOING IT TO MYSELF. I'm not saying it wasn't tough, most people don't live through it, but EVERYDAY there was a moment of clarity when I said, "you know you don't have to do this" but i did anyway. I was forsaking all other things to the point of losing 45 lbs, being homeless for 2 years and living in a bathroom of a gas station. And that doesn't happen overnight. I still had a job waitering, so I didn't have to resort to crime or prostitution, but it wasn't easy. However, I chose to continue and everyone has a choice. Had i been there when they started to whine I'd say the same to them. Like my mom used to say "you made your bed, now lie in it."
 
2012-11-19 12:31:12 PM  
Hey, thanks for reminding me to call my contact, Subby! It's almost the Holiday!
 
2012-11-19 12:31:43 PM  

SkunkWerks: Hrist: This is called self medication. People with ADD/ADHD were much more likely than regular people to be addicted to some kind of stimulant. Namely, caffeine, nicotine, amphetamines, cocaine, etc. They found a lot more benefit than the average person did...in that it helped with their ADD/ADHD. People with depression tend to self medicate with alcohol, benzos (like Xanax), and opiates (like heroin). You sound like you might have some kind of slight anxiety problem....a lot of people with the same kind of problem will self medicate with benzos or pot.

Met plenty of ADD people self-medicating with depressants. Went to private school where most kids had either that or some sort of discipline issues. Many self-medicated, but I don't recall it being nearly so... "well-planned".

If there's studies that have been done proving this notion, I'd love to see them. If not, I think this is just wishful thinking.

Hrist: Self medication is all fine and dandy

Not really. In part because-unlike what you just said above- most people aren't doctors (though I've heard that pill-popping is probably most prevalent among medical professionals- largely due to access), often don't have the faintest clue what chemicals do what , what they themselves need, and very often just end up "self-medicating" on whatever tickles them the best.

Fun: still a valid reason for doing drugs, even if you do have some sort of disorder or other chemical deficiency.

Sometimes it might be the "right" choice, and sometimes it might not be. In the latter case, there's my wife's half-brother who has chosen pot as his "self-medication" of preference.

Problem: he very likely suffers from an as-yet-undiagnosed form of schizophrenia, and most medical studies done on this topic will agree that pot smoking exacerbates this particular condition.

I can't say it's done him a lot of good, in any case. Moral of the story being: while doctors are certainly far from perfect, and may not be doing the best thing ...


Well, the reason I mention these things is because those drugs have some kind of benefit for sufferers of various conditions than they do other people. Like you can totally say opiates are fun for about everyone that do them recreationally, but to someone that is in pain for some reason anyway (perhaps they've sprained their ankle or have a kidney stone) then the opiate goes above and beyond the typical recreational effects. Stimulants help treat ADD/ADHD symptoms and make you better able to focus, depressed people like being not depressed (euphoria), and anxious people like to be able to chill the fark out once in a while.

If you looked at a whole population as to what recreational drugs they prefer, you might get some distribution. We'll call it Distribution A. Then you look at a population made entirely of ADD/ADHD types, Distribution B, and the percentage of people in B that prefer stimulants is probably greater than the percentage of people in Distribution A, and so on and so on. Even if people aren't intrinsically aware that they're doing it, a drug that helps their condition is going to be more represented than it was in Distribution A. It isn't really a formal thing in most cases. Sometimes it is, but usually it is just trial and error.
 
2012-11-19 12:32:07 PM  

Elandriel: I used to smoke a lot of pot, recreationally as I don't think I had anything really going wrong with my life. There is a period of depression when you quit, because the chemistry of your brain is altered slightly because of the mood elevation properties of THC. It's not necessarily masking already existing depression, it's simply that you are "used" to feeling that way at a certain time of day (after work in my case), and with that added boost gone the resulting sobriety feels lower and more down than you would otherwise feel. It is noticeable.

It's not necessarily addictive, to the extent that the withdrawal symptoms are weak as compared with a hard drug or even habitual drinking, but there certainly are symptoms that exist when you move from heavy smoking to infrequent or quitting altogether.

This person though, this was covered by jayelectricity.


Seems to me like this isn't much different from feeling a lemonade craving if you got used to having delicious lemonade after a hard day's work in the sun.
 
2012-11-19 12:33:19 PM  
I am going to put progesterone cream into all of the hot cocoa sampler boxes I give my potted up employees this year for their xmas bonus.
 
2012-11-19 12:35:48 PM  
i.ytimg.com

/took this long?
 
2012-11-19 12:36:40 PM  

SuperDuper28: Im sure Fark will be completely unbiased with it's large age16-24 male pot smoker penised high-IQ studmuffin demographic.

 
2012-11-19 12:37:36 PM  
how i'm the bewbs with this i'll never know

i.ytimg.com

know where it goes
 
2012-11-19 12:38:22 PM  

Grobbley: [i.ytimg.com image 480x360]

/took this long?


*shakes tiny late fist*
 
2012-11-19 12:38:30 PM  

Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool


Does cannabis inhibit dream recollection?
 
2012-11-19 12:38:54 PM  

Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool


You don't remember your dreams when you get stoned? I've never heard of that.
 
2012-11-19 12:40:28 PM  

Dirtybird971: What's worse than drugs? Having to talk to posers like the "author" of this article. On and on, writing a lot and saying nothing. She asked for advice, not a farking diatribe.


Thank you. I felt like the "answer" was pretty much just repeating back everything the author was complaining about, and no, I do not want to click to see more.
 
2012-11-19 12:43:57 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

You don't remember your dreams when you get stoned? I've never heard of that.


Yes you have, you just don't remember.
 
2012-11-19 12:46:37 PM  

Hrist: Well, the reason I mention these things is because those drugs have some kind of benefit for sufferers of various conditions than they do other people.


I get that. But you're also pretty starkly implying that people with such needs somehow know naturally (without any scientific understanding of what they have or what they're taking to "remedy" it) to gravitate towards these things- as if they have some sort of deep knowledge of their particular deficiencies, of chemistry, and of how to best balance themselves- simply because they have deficiencies.

In all my experience around people with ADD/ADHD (and I've had quite a lot, both as a sufferer myself and as a spectator) I've never seen that this is so. Though I have seen plenty of addicts use it as a lame excuse for what they do.

Again, if there's a study out there that suggests people have some sort of bizarro "spider sense" with regards to illicit solutions to complex neuro chemical issues, I'd be interested to see it. Otherwise it just seems to mostly be a convenient excuse to me.


It seems far more likely to me that people who were dealt a bad hand in the biological department tend to get themselves into trouble more, trouble which would include- among other things- substance abuse. The instances where an abused substance actually dovetails with the chemical needs of the abuser seems more like a happy accident than some sort of divine providence to me.
 
2012-11-19 12:48:24 PM  
Hopefully legalization will erode away the stoner stigma, and make the average person realize we aren't all shiatlocked trustafarians with poorly groomed facial hair, red eyes and a penchant for lazily accentuating our vowels (duuuude, brooooo)
Everyday people who don't happen to revolve their lives around marijuana still enjoy marijuana
 
2012-11-19 12:52:13 PM  

Dirtybird971: I don't have to imagine it. I lived it for nearly a decade. And it's still just an excuse. nearly everyday during that time I KNEW IT WAS ME DOING IT TO MYSELF. I'm not saying it wasn't tough, most people don't live through it, but EVERYDAY there was a moment of clarity when I said, "you know you don't have to do this" but i did anyway. I was forsaking all other things to the point of losing 45 lbs, being homeless for 2 years and living in a bathroom of a gas station. I still had a job waitering, so I didn't have to resort to crime or prostitution, but it wasn't easy. However, I choose to continue and everyone has a choice. Had i been there when they started to whine I'd say the same to them. Like my mom used to say "you made your bed, now lie in it."


I didn't. Know. Your brain can rationalize to an amazing degree, especially if you're drunk all the time. I'd been on the streets for a couple of years before I suddenly realized, "You know, no matter where you go and what you do, your problem isn't your location. It's that you're a drunk."

And after that it was no fun anymore, and I did quit. Still took me a couple more years, a trip to rehab, another DUI, and feeling like shiat most of the time, but I did finally quit. But for most of my time drinking, I didn't really "know" that the alcohol was causing my problems. And there are plenty of addicts just like i was. Sometimes support groups can help them come to grips with the fact that they're the problem--whatever's going on in their heads. it's not just life has dealt them a shiat hand, like I thought for a long time.

You aren't the only clean addict in the world, you know.  AA probably helped save my life.
 
2012-11-19 12:56:36 PM  
Dope is for dopes
Drugs are for dummies
And if you mess around with them
That mess isn't funny
 
2012-11-19 12:57:38 PM  
Okay folks, this is actually in my area of expertise...my research is more stimulant-focused (cocaine, methamphetamine), but the mechanisms of addiction key components of my day-to-day. Here are a few things:

1. Anyone claiming that cannabis cannot or does not cause dependence, shut up. You're wrong. Just like with any human-drug combination, the magnitude of the dependence is going to vary widely based on genetics, exposure levels & patterns, co-abuse, and co-morbid psychological conditions.

1a. Likewise, the manner in which one enters the abstinence phase of quitting will dramatically affect withdrawal symptoms. Long-term heavy users will often needs weeks to months for highly lipophilic cannabinoids to clear their systems--this long taper tends to ease the transition to abstinence, but I assure you, an administered CB1 antagonist (e.g., Rimonabant) will make these people feel like complete shiat, not unlike long-time tobacco smokers 36-hours post last cigarette.

2. It is very common for people to "self-medicate" for clinical and sub-clinical psychological disorders using drugs like THC, alcohol, nicotine, and things much harder. This is almost always to the detriment of treating the underlying condition(s) as it merely applies a band-aid to some of the symptoms while creating newer problems, psychologically and medically. If you suspect you are one of these people, you should seek some professional help. You might find that treating the underlying problem actually feels better than the high.

3. While dependence is a quasi-objective measure of the physiological effects of chronic drug-taking, the term addiction is a sociological construct. Simply put, a compulsive behavior becomes an addiction when it starts to interfere with your life. When cannabis use contributes to inadequate or unhealthy relationships or slows the setting and attainment of personal goals (be it work, school, or whatever), you don't need a DSM-IV to identify that it's a problem. Unfortunately, psychological disorders and drugs of abuse can often make it near-impossible for the type of self-reflection necessary to seek such help.

4. Reefer Madness and a lot of the anti-drug hype machine is fear-mongering bullshiat. The gateway hypothesis is pretty much dead as a serious academic topic. That said, don't buy the hype that cannabis is fun & harmless or a panacea for all your medical ailments. Actual effects of cannabis in humans are still woefully understudied and there's minimal good science behind most of the positive non-euphoric claims. As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.
 
2012-11-19 12:59:20 PM  

joonyer: kindms: Well we are certainly seeing a major uptick on the "Evils of Pot" stories and TV spots since election day.

CNN had a spot, the local Fox affiliate has done "reports"

I guess the anti-pot crowd still has some propaganda to spread and some money to burn.

That federal funding isn't going to spend itself now is it?


i49.tinypic.com


http://i49.tinypic.com/2drfdok.gif
 
2012-11-19 01:00:50 PM  
the problem is that this lady has always been farked up
 
2012-11-19 01:00:54 PM  
SkunkWerks

It seems far more likely to me that people who were dealt a bad hand in the biological department tend to get themselves into trouble more, trouble which would include- among other things- substance abuse. The instances where an abused substance actually dovetails with the chemical needs of the abuser seems more like a happy accident than some sort of divine providence to me.


Other factors:

Co-dependency
Family pain
 
2012-11-19 01:02:41 PM  
Actually, typically, dope mavins test superior biometrically.
 
2012-11-19 01:03:19 PM  
Reading some of this stuff makes me glad i seem to be immune to most withdrawal and side effects from any drug.

/Has had to take many different meds in my life
//was on oxy for pain for almost 3 months
///stopped cold turkey
////was in college at the time and did perfectly fine!
//Addicted to slashies though!
 
2012-11-19 01:04:11 PM  

bmwericus: jfivealive: Am i the only one that thinks the salon just got trolled by someone bored and stoned?

You mean the original letter writer, or the response, which I think read like a guy really ripped. Read like one of my essays in college when I was ripped to the bejesus belt...

Some people get high and DO things, some get high and do nothing, depends on the person and the weed it seems.


Back when I smoked, pot made me want to get outside and enjoy the world. I used to love hiking with a good buzz.
 
2012-11-19 01:04:14 PM  

blahpers: Seems to me like this isn't much different from feeling a lemonade craving if you got used to having delicious lemonade after a hard day's work in the sun.


More or less! I would feel a little low, tired, sort of humdrum. A very extremely apathetic feeling, more than when actually high. It went away after a day or two.
 
2012-11-19 01:05:26 PM  
Man in article is a woman? Maybe they're in a gay relationship but there's no real mention of the writer's gender.

FTFA: Both my husband and I were serious pot smokers, pretty much 24/7 for the last eight years or so.

/subby fail?
 
2012-11-19 01:05:56 PM  

TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.


comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.
 
2012-11-19 01:06:15 PM  

TabASlotB: 4. Reefer Madness and a lot of the anti-drug hype machine is fear-mongering bullshiat. The gateway hypothesis is pretty much dead as a serious academic topic. That said, don't buy the hype that cannabis is fun & harmless or a panacea for all your medical ailments. Actual effects of cannabis in humans are still woefully understudied and there's minimal good science behind most of the positive non-euphoric claims. As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.


Dude, you might want to see a doctor. You just turned green for some reason.
 
2012-11-19 01:07:03 PM  
going sober can be quite an experience.

I highly recommend it.

Any advice? Drink lots of water. Give it time.

It took my brain at least three months to thaw out and then it took about 3 years for my attitude to fully adjust to my new reality.
 
2012-11-19 01:08:16 PM  

cryinoutloud


Smartest
Funniest

2012-11-19 12:52:13 PM

Dirtybird971: I don't have to imagine it. I lived it for nearly a decade. And it's still just an excuse. nearly everyday during that time I KNEW IT WAS ME DOING IT TO MYSELF. I'm not saying it wasn't tough, most people don't live through it, but EVERYDAY there was a moment of clarity when I said, "you know you don't have to do this" but i did anyway. I was forsaking all other things to the point of losing 45 lbs, being homeless for 2 years and living in a bathroom of a gas station. I still had a job waitering, so I didn't have to resort to crime or prostitution, but it wasn't easy. However, I choose to continue and everyone has a choice. Had i been there when they started to whine I'd say the same to them. Like my mom used to say "you made your bed, now lie in it."

I didn't. Know. Your brain can rationalize to an amazing degree, especially if you're drunk all the time. I'd been on the streets for a couple of years before I suddenly realized, "You know, no matter where you go and what you do, your problem isn't your location. It's that you're a drunk."

And after that it was no fun anymore, and I did quit. Still took me a couple more years, a trip to rehab, another DUI, and feeling like shiat most of the time, but I did finally quit. But for most of my time drinking, I didn't really "know" that the alcohol was causing my problems. And there are plenty of addicts just like i was. Sometimes support groups can help them come to grips with the fact that they're the problem--whatever's going on in their heads. it's not just life has dealt them a shiat hand, like I thought for a long time.

You aren't the only clean addict in the world, you know. AA probably helped save my life.


I don't mean to make light of your pain, I'm glad you found a reason to get clean too but accepting personal responsibility is a hallmark/cornerstone of an addict, no matter the drug. I wouldn't call it rationalization, you liked drinking or being drunk just like I loved being high on heroin. Everything was better or at least you couldn't tell how shaitty you'd(i'd) made it. But I didn't get much support from the groups. Generally, they were cliques and if you weren't one of them you were shunned. Maybe you were one of them, either way I'm glad you found your peace.
 
2012-11-19 01:09:53 PM  
 
2012-11-19 01:10:03 PM  

SkunkWerks: Hrist: Well, the reason I mention these things is because those drugs have some kind of benefit for sufferers of various conditions than they do other people.

I get that. But you're also pretty starkly implying that people with such needs somehow know naturally (without any scientific understanding of what they have or what they're taking to "remedy" it) to gravitate towards these things- as if they have some sort of deep knowledge of their particular deficiencies, of chemistry, and of how to best balance themselves- simply because they have deficiencies.

In all my experience around people with ADD/ADHD (and I've had quite a lot, both as a sufferer myself and as a spectator) I've never seen that this is so. Though I have seen plenty of addicts use it as a lame excuse for what they do.

Again, if there's a study out there that suggests people have some sort of bizarro "spider sense" with regards to illicit solutions to complex neuro chemical issues, I'd be interested to see it. Otherwise it just seems to mostly be a convenient excuse to me.


It seems far more likely to me that people who were dealt a bad hand in the biological department tend to get themselves into trouble more, trouble which would include- among other things- substance abuse. The instances where an abused substance actually dovetails with the chemical needs of the abuser seems more like a happy accident than some sort of divine providence to me.


There really isn't something as clear cut as a spidey sense for what drug you need. People with 'problems' are more likely to try illegal drugs, which means they have a higher chance of encountering something that is both fun and helps with the problem in some way.

I'm just making statistical predictions. All other factors held the same, people should prefer the drug that is the most beneficial to them in the end, in terms of treatment/recreation, not speaking strictly of their health.
 
2012-11-19 01:12:04 PM  

Headso: TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.

comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.


and you obviously have never been addicted to anything.
 
2012-11-19 01:15:18 PM  

Dirtybird971: cryinoutloud


Smartest
Funniest

2012-11-19 12:52:13 PM

Dirtybird971: I don't have to imagine it. I lived it for nearly a decade. And it's still just an excuse. nearly everyday during that time I KNEW IT WAS ME DOING IT TO MYSELF. I'm not saying it wasn't tough, most people don't live through it, but EVERYDAY there was a moment of clarity when I said, "you know you don't have to do this" but i did anyway. I was forsaking all other things to the point of losing 45 lbs, being homeless for 2 years and living in a bathroom of a gas station. I still had a job waitering, so I didn't have to resort to crime or prostitution, but it wasn't easy. However, I choose to continue and everyone has a choice. Had i been there when they started to whine I'd say the same to them. Like my mom used to say "you made your bed, now lie in it."

I didn't. Know. Your brain can rationalize to an amazing degree, especially if you're drunk all the time. I'd been on the streets for a couple of years before I suddenly realized, "You know, no matter where you go and what you do, your problem isn't your location. It's that you're a drunk."

And after that it was no fun anymore, and I did quit. Still took me a couple more years, a trip to rehab, another DUI, and feeling like shiat most of the time, but I did finally quit. But for most of my time drinking, I didn't really "know" that the alcohol was causing my problems. And there are plenty of addicts just like i was. Sometimes support groups can help them come to grips with the fact that they're the problem--whatever's going on in their heads. it's not just life has dealt them a shiat hand, like I thought for a long time.

You aren't the only clean addict in the world, you know. AA probably helped save my life.

I don't mean to make light of your pain, I'm glad you found a reason to get clean too but accepting personal responsibility is a hallmark/cornerstone of an addict, no matter the drug. I wouldn't call it rationalization, you liked drinking or being drunk just like I loved being high on heroin. Everything was better or at least you couldn't tell how shaitty you'd(i'd) made it. But I didn't get much support from the groups. Generally, they were cliques and if you weren't one of them you were shunned. Maybe you were one of them, either way I'm glad you found your peace.


Rationalization is a HUGE part of addiction. What usually gets people started on pain pills is rationalization. You take your week supply as directed. You don't want to BE in pain..rational thought. So you keep taking it as not to be in pain. Even if the source of the pain has cleared up, you don't want to take that chance. By the time you're out with no refills you've got a little monkey on your back and WILL be in pain when you stop. So you'll ask for more.
 
2012-11-19 01:16:16 PM  

Headso: TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.

comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.

 

Chemically, you are correct.

If you are a really dedicated pot head, and I was, then you have a certain outlook on life and things. Once you quit, you might get some headaches or whatnot, nothing too bad, nothing that can't be dealt with using Ibuprofen.

I was high for about 10 years, the last five years I smoked weed alot. I was high every day for five years. I woke up in the middle of the night to smoke. I smoked right before work, on lunch and on the drive home from work. At one point I was driving around with a water bong the size of a coke can in my car's cup holder. I was a weed missionary. Anyway. After that long living in that reality, sobering up can be a little disturbing.

I'm just saying give the guy some slack...
 
2012-11-19 01:16:32 PM  
What the remedy for fark addiction? A good cockpunching?
 
2012-11-19 01:18:23 PM  
By and large I have surely enjoyed the sociality of cannabis: A joint between chess games, at breaks in bike rides, sharing cultivation tips. I was pretty solotonic before I baked.
 
2012-11-19 01:18:55 PM  

thrgd456: going sober can be quite an experience.

I highly recommend it.

Any advice? Drink lots of water. Give it time.

It took my brain at least three months to thaw out and then it took about 3 years for my attitude to fully adjust to my new reality.


The real trick to getting the most out of pot is to let your brain settle in between sessions of getting high. The problem with most stoners is that they smoke every day, so basically getting high is just maintaining, their brain always seems pretty much the same. If you only get high 1-2 times a week, however, each time you get high is much stronger, as you have a baseline of normality to compare things to and your brain's chemical supply is replenished fully.
 
2012-11-19 01:20:13 PM  

suthrnrunt: Headso: TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.

comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.

and you obviously have never been addicted to anything.


I'm addicted to my morning coffee first and foremost but I also smoke pot, which I could take or leave depending on if I feel like smoking at any given time or not.
 
2012-11-19 01:24:42 PM  
ANYTHING can be addictive.  Especially when you're using it as a crutch.
 
People get addicted to shopping, and there's no drugs involved there.
 
2012-11-19 01:39:45 PM  

Happy Hours: jaylectricity: Stop blaming cannabis. You were in need of a life change and instead of doing it through positivity you chose drugs to fix it.

Yeah, pretty much this. Too often when anyone has problems with life and smokes pot, the pot gets blamed. If only they hadn't smoked pot their life would be peaches and cream (or unicorns and rainbows).

That's a crock of shiat. Pot doesn't screw up people's lives (and it doesn't lead to success either). There are a whole lot of other things which affect success or failure in life.


This. I smoke, and I'm a lazy son of a biatch. But I was a lazy son of a biatch to begin with before I even discovered the stuff. Pot doesn't "make" you anything, it simply builds upon whatever is already there.

I smoke, and I have flaws, but the flaws are not from smoking, despite what those with specific agendas would like you to believe. I'm not perfect, but I'm not so egotistical as to try to blame my flaws on a scapegoat. We are ultimately responsible for ourselves.
 
2012-11-19 01:41:44 PM  

suthrnrunt: Headso: TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.

comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.

and you obviously have never been addicted to anything.


Not all addictions are created equal.
 
Skr
2012-11-19 01:43:13 PM  
I used to be a big pothead like her, but then I took an arrow to the knee.
 
2012-11-19 01:44:21 PM  

Headso: TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.

comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.


Curious. Is "putting on clothes right out of the dryer" a compulsion that causes physiological and/or social stress to anyone? No? It's not an addiction.

Caffeine dependence is real--I don't function particularly well without my morning coffee. I have a close collaborator that studies adenosine receptors (the target of caffeine) within the corticolimbic structures of the brain (the pathways that control addiction), trying to figure out how caffeine affects this neural circuitry. Caffeine loses most of its positive subjective value within the first couple of weeks of use and the drive to dependence is driven largely by the negative affect of the withdrawal symptoms--which is rather different from patterns of THC use in humans. Still, as addictions go, very few people have levels of negative physiological and/or social consequences due to compulsive caffeine intake that would support an "addiction" label. The line is fuzzy, but caffeine probably wouldn't cross it for most academics, at least by my estimation of the field.

I suspect your comment was meant to downplay the idea of cannabis as addictive or as causing dependence. As I tried to make clear in my comment, the path to dependence varies widely among individuals, as do the consequences of that dependence. One individual's personal smoking habits does not invalidate the general pattern.
 
2012-11-19 01:50:04 PM  

downstairs: ANYTHING can be addictive.  Especially when you're using it as a crutch.
 
People get addicted to shopping, and there's no drugs involved there.


Or gambling. Same thing. You get a high off winning, or a high off finding a good deal, etc...

We only call such things an addiction if we have some reason to dislike the particular product/activity. Nobody wants to put scientists who spend hours in the lab doing experiments to get a similar high into 12-step programs, but the feeling they get making discoveries is pretty much exactly the same high gamblers get by winning.
 
2012-11-19 01:56:39 PM  
If you wanna be a happy stoner, you have to exercise. Actually, if you want to be a happy anything you have to exercise. I'm about to hike this canyon in 10 minutes. Will legally light up my homegrown during the hike since I'm in Colorado. That's right b*tches, biggest toker state in the Union is also the healthiest.

www.nps.gov
 
2012-11-19 01:57:35 PM  
In related news, there is now a bill beginning to be floated in Texas that will decriminalize marijuana possession of 1oz or less to being the equivalent of a traffic fine.

/crossing my fingers
 
2012-11-19 02:00:38 PM  

TabASlotB: I suspect your comment was meant to downplay the idea of cannabis as addictive or as causing dependence.


My comment was meant to challenge your comparison of pot to two highly addictive chemicals that kill people all the time. You are "up-playing" the idea with your comparisons and I was just tethering it back to reality.
 
2012-11-19 02:01:31 PM  
Why does everyone keep saying "he". It's a woman.
 
2012-11-19 02:01:35 PM  

miscreant: downstairs: ANYTHING can be addictive.  Especially when you're using it as a crutch.
 
People get addicted to shopping, and there's no drugs involved there.

Or gambling. Same thing. You get a high off winning, or a high off finding a good deal, etc...

We only call such things an addiction if we have some reason to dislike the particular product/activity. Nobody wants to put scientists who spend hours in the lab doing experiments to get a similar high into 12-step programs, but the feeling they get making discoveries is pretty much exactly the same high gamblers get by winning.


Actually, there is one unusual difference with gambling compared with the normal dopamine rushes associated with achievement. When a "neurotypical" (for lack of a better term) person wins at gambling, they'll get the rush, but won't get a rush if they lose. However, longer exposures to gambling causes a shift in the dopamine signaling, synching the dopamine releases not with the winning event but the environmental cues at first associated with winning and later just associated with being at the table or slot machine. Over time, gambling addicts get roughly the same rush from losing as they do winning. It's really quite fascinating.

It's quite possible that Professor Graybeard landing his third RO1 and Howard Hughes funding may also get that kind of rush, but I don't think anyone has ever studied it... :)
 
2012-11-19 02:02:57 PM  

Maul555: In related news, there is now a bill beginning to be floated in Texas that will decriminalize marijuana possession of 1oz or less to being the equivalent of a traffic fine.

/crossing my fingers


You got a link?
 
2012-11-19 02:12:12 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Maul555: In related news, there is now a bill beginning to be floated in Texas that will decriminalize marijuana possession of 1oz or less to being the equivalent of a traffic fine.

/crossing my fingers

You got a link?


I just heard about it on the radio this morning... I cant find a link... it was on 1200 WOAI
 
2012-11-19 02:13:29 PM  
nevermind, found a linky
 
2012-11-19 02:14:59 PM  

Dr Dreidel: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?


Yes, this is a common effect of quitting. Not only remembering them but having REALLY VIVID dreams.
 
2012-11-19 02:22:32 PM  

Headso: TabASlotB: I suspect your comment was meant to downplay the idea of cannabis as addictive or as causing dependence.

My comment was meant to challenge your comparison of pot to two highly addictive chemicals that kill people all the time. You are "up-playing" the idea with your comparisons and I was just tethering it back to reality.


Ah, okay. That certainly wasn't clear earlier, but it's a fair point. The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco. However, cannabis use is only a fraction of alcohol and tobacco and orders of magnitude less-studied. That said, based on the current level of research, cannabis use does have risks. Here are a couple of recent studies:

Acute cannabis consumption is associated with an increased risk of a motor vehicle crash, especially for fatal collisions.
Fold-risk for increased mortality by accident (6.3-10.5), suicide (3.3-7.9), homicide/violence (1.5-7.9), and natural causes (2.0-3.7).
This review places cannabis morbidity and mortality in the context of other illicit drugs and alcohol. In general, it's less well-studied and therefore the risks are less clear across conditions. Accidents, particularly traffic accidents, are clearly elevated and the risk of psychosis (though small) has never gone away no matter how well-controlled the studies get. It's clearly not heroin or meth, but it's not warm, fluffy sweatpants or a mochachino either.
 
2012-11-19 02:22:40 PM  
If you don't like it get out of bat country.
 
2012-11-19 02:26:18 PM  
Came for the rabid and crazy anti-pot rant post.

/leaves disappointed
//what a world, what a world
 
2012-11-19 02:28:00 PM  

Maul555: nevermind, found a linky


Cool, thanks!
 
2012-11-19 02:30:24 PM  
It's called jonesing, and apparently doesn't exist
 
2012-11-19 02:31:14 PM  
Wait, wait, wait...this story is bogus. You can't get addicted to pot. The stoners told me so.
 
2012-11-19 02:36:59 PM  
In a rare moment of seriousness I offer the following from the Journal of Psyciatric medicine:

http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleID=1184217

He might very well "cure" himself with an over the counter vitamin supplement that reduces a deficiency caused cannabis.
 
2012-11-19 02:42:10 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

You don't remember your dreams when you get stoned? I've never heard of that.


Likely because it's bullshiat.
 
2012-11-19 02:44:41 PM  

Dragonflew: The My Little Pony Killer: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

You don't remember your dreams when you get stoned? I've never heard of that.

Likely because it's bullshiat.


Is it? There is a lot of evidence in this thread that suggests it isnt bullshiat.
 
2012-11-19 02:44:51 PM  

DammitIForgotMyLogin: Dr Dreidel: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?

Happened to me too


it's the short term memory loss..if you keep a note pad next to your bed and start writing down what your dream was about as soon as you wake up you'll be able to remember more of it..or so I am told..
 
2012-11-19 02:50:11 PM  

REO-Weedwagon: If you wanna be a happy stoner, you have to exercise. Actually, if you want to be a happy anything you have to exercise. I'm about to hike this canyon in 10 minutes. Will legally light up my homegrown during the hike since I'm in Colorado. That's right b*tches, biggest toker state in the Union is also the healthiest.

[www.nps.gov image 556x200]


Can we be best friends? I spent a month hiking around the San Juan range and have been dying to get back ever since... I've also spent a few weeks in Crested Butte during the winter. I miss Colorado.
 
2012-11-19 02:51:17 PM  

REO-Weedwagon: If you wanna be a happy stoner, you have to exercise. Actually, if you want to be a happy anything you have to exercise. I'm about to hike this canyon in 10 minutes. Will legally light up my homegrown during the hike since I'm in Colorado. That's right b*tches, biggest toker state in the Union is also the healthiest.

[www.nps.gov image 556x200]



Wow. You are stoned
Because Monument Valley is in Utah.
http://www.nps.gov/colm/photosmultimedia/images/monument_valley_556 x200.jpg
 
2012-11-19 02:56:29 PM  

TabASlotB: . The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco


yeah like 100% less for mortality...
 
2012-11-19 03:06:16 PM  

dryknife: REO-Weedwagon: If you wanna be a happy stoner, you have to exercise. Actually, if you want to be a happy anything you have to exercise. I'm about to hike this canyon in 10 minutes. Will legally light up my homegrown during the hike since I'm in Colorado. That's right b*tches, biggest toker state in the Union is also the healthiest.

[www.nps.gov image 556x200]


Wow. You are stoned
Because Monument Valley is in Utah.
http://www.nps.gov/colm/photosmultimedia/images/monument_valley_556 x200.jpg


I'm only jumping in because I already commented on the photo... that file name should be Monument Canyon as in Colorado National Monument. Googling a file name can be misleading. Might want to check yourself before calling others out.
 
2012-11-19 03:09:33 PM  

jaylectricity: I feel depressed and am not sure what to do with myself.

You were already depressed and you were escaping through drugs.

I used to work part time and would spend the rest of the time getting high and watching TV. Now that I am not getting high, I feel like my husband and I don't relate any more.

Maybe that's because after a year or two of marriage you both tuned each other out and began getting high and watching TV. Now that you're not getting high, you're noticing the deficiencies in your relationship. Again...you already had a problem that you were escaping through drugs.

during the 10 years that I was a pothead, I lost all of my friends because I would rather smoke than hang out with them.

In your times of trouble, instead of leaning on your friends, you turned to drugs.

Any advice would be welcome.

Stop blaming cannabis. You were in need of a life change and instead of doing it through positivity you chose drugs to fix it.


Mostly well-said, but I argue you shouldn't discount the role of cannabis entirely. Of course, it could have been any other drug. But the fact is, without the drug, this person would have had to develop another way to cope. I am completely in favor of legalized weed, and I feel many people can use it safely, but it would be disingenuous to ignore that some people CAN'T use weed, or any other substance, safely. I have learned in my own treatment (for painkillers, which I needed for years after many surgeries) that addiction is a bio-psycho-social illness. 2/3 of it has nothing to do with the drug. But 1/3 does. Therefore, the correct approach is neither to place all blame on the substance NOR to discount the role of the substance entirely. It is all to easy for us liberal pot-advocate types to ignore all dangers of pot because acknowledging them would seem to play into the hands of those who wish, stubbornly, to keep it illegal. The fact is that pot is a drug, and has benefits and risks like any other drug; it is not magically safe just because it is non-lethal and technically non-addictive. Cocaine/crack is not physically addictive either... but who can deny the serious psychological addictive potential of these drugs? So it is with weed. We should acknowledge that weed, like alcohol, is safe for some people and not others; safe in some circumstances and not others; safe in some doses and not others; and so forth. Otherwise we risk sounding just as bad as certain anti-drug PSA's that exaggerate or invent the dangers to a point when they lose all credibility.
 
2012-11-19 03:11:15 PM  

Hrist: most beneficial


In what way?

This is kinda important (read, "very important"). Because plenty of people do things they find "most beneficial to them" in superficial ways (it's fun/feels great/etc.) that are severely detrimental in other ways. In fact, after you get done tabulating the positives and negatives, the ultimate movement is often a negative one. Or, as someone far more articulate on the matter than myself put it:

TabASlotB: 2. It is very common for people to "self-medicate" for clinical and sub-clinical psychological disorders using drugs like THC, alcohol, nicotine, and things much harder. This is almost always to the detriment of treating the underlying condition(s) as it merely applies a band-aid to some of the symptoms while creating newer problems, psychologically and medically. If you suspect you are one of these people, you should seek some professional help. You might find that treating the underlying problem actually feels better than the high.

*

*emphasis mine

Hrist: I'm just making statistical predictions.


I don't think you are. Or if you are they're deeply dependent on the assumption that people always have their own biochemistry in mind when they choose recreational drugs. As I parenthetically pointed out earlier, medical professionals (doctors, nurses, and so forth) are often the most prone to prescription drug abuse (again: access). You'd think they of all people would be equipped to know better, but this is apparently (and often) not the case.

Proximity and Availability rule those statistics. But somehow laypeople with no medical expertise whatsoever are going to show better judgement?

It's pure myth, I tell you. Wishful thinking at best, and a pitiful excuse to enable dangerous behavior at worst.
 
2012-11-19 03:14:51 PM  

Headso: TabASlotB: . The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco

yeah like 100% less for mortality...


Only if the only measure of mortality is overdose. But nobody ever dies from a nicotine overdose, either...completely undermining your point.

I cited actual studies above. If you're just going to be disingenuous, I'll find others worth talking to.
 
2012-11-19 03:22:00 PM  

TabASlotB: Headso: TabASlotB: . The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco

yeah like 100% less for mortality...

Only if the only measure of mortality is overdose. But nobody ever dies from a nicotine overdose, either...completely undermining your point.

I cited actual studies above. If you're just going to be disingenuous, I'll find others worth talking to.


http://articles.latimes.com/1995-05-14/news/mn-968_1_linda-curry

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicotine_poisoning
 
2012-11-19 03:23:13 PM  

TabASlotB: Headso: TabASlotB: . The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco

yeah like 100% less for mortality...

Only if the only measure of mortality is overdose. But nobody ever dies from a nicotine overdose, either...completely undermining your point.

I cited actual studies above. If you're just going to be disingenuous, I'll find others worth talking to.


you can find cases of people dying from nicotine overdose, it's actually possible to do so.
 
2012-11-19 03:23:45 PM  
Canada's courts found that cannabis use forestalled mortality.
 
2012-11-19 03:26:34 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicotine_poisoning

"Historically, most cases of nicotine poisoning have been the result of use of nicotine as an insecticide."

"People who harvest or cultivate tobacco may experience Green Tobacco Sickness (GTS), a type of nicotine poisoning caused by dermal exposure to wet tobacco leaves."


So, near as I can tell, no one has ever died from nicotine poisoning by way of smoking cigarettes. This may factor into the debate you're currently having somehow, I think.
 
2012-11-19 03:28:35 PM  

Hrist: dready zim: Dirtybird971: Hey lady? It was pot, let it go. Sobriety is a hell of a drug. And it takes some getting used to.

What's worse than drugs? Having to talk to posers like the "author" of this article. On and on, writing a lot and saying nothing. She asked for advice, not a farking diatribe.

the "church of all of us who've been there" really?? STFU and drink this.

/10 years clean and I still hate ex-addicts. Stupid farking meetings and coffee and "truth" and feelings.
//great now I feel sick.

So much THIS. There are no people holier than thou than ex addicts who wont freakin shut up about it.

I remember being at an after party and these 2 ex heroin users were banging on about how hard it was when they were farking over everyone they knew to get high and how being straight was so hard so I told them about this one time I was peaking on mushrooms and got a phone call to say my father had died from a heart attack and I had to drive to the family home in torrential rain and look at the corpse of my father laid out in the living room whilst all the time tripping on mushrooms.

They stopped banging on about how hard it was stealing from people and getting high.

assholes.

I've got friends who are ex addicts. Having talked to them quite a bit about it in the past, it was a lot harder than you might think. I mean, imagine this.

You wake up and feel like hell. You've woken up and felt like hell every morning for a year now. Imagine (for you and I) waking up after a night of drinking, where you don't quite have a hangover, but you don't feel good either. The kind of 'blah' that isn't going to be solved by an Alka Seltzer and greasy breakfast. But you do know something that can fix it. Even though you're reaching for your kit, you still feel low just for doing so. No matter how you talk about it to your friends, you still feel that it is somehow wrong, but you still do it. But look, your kit is empty. You've used it all. Or maybe someone else used it ...


What does heroin feel like -Reddit. Sorry it's in video form, I couldn't find the original post. I'll add that, yes ex-drug users can be annoyingly sanctimonious, but quitting drugs is the hardest thing ever, harder than the seven surgeries that led to me being on drugs in the first place. Ex-drug users deserve every same shred of respect for besting their addictions that you would bestow upon a cancer survivor. I've managed to beat two illnesses in my life, one a serious physical illness, and one the mental illness of addiction (I still haven't beaten depression/anxiety though): the addiction was far far harder, but guess what, society doesn't feel that way, and while I've often been called a "hero" for beating my physical illness, rarely do I get the same response for the mental illness (outside of 12-step groups, I guess). (By the way, I personally don't consider myself a hero for ether victory, because neither was my choice, and heroism implies choice; I merely did what I had to do. Bottom line: have some compassion for ex-druggies; they had many many chances to take the easy way out, and they did not.

http://www.sickchirpse.com/2012/07/29/heroin-addiction/
 
2012-11-19 03:29:52 PM  

blahpers: Elandriel: I used to smoke a lot of pot, recreationally as I don't think I had anything really going wrong with my life. There is a period of depression when you quit, because the chemistry of your brain is altered slightly because of the mood elevation properties of THC. It's not necessarily masking already existing depression, it's simply that you are "used" to feeling that way at a certain time of day (after work in my case), and with that added boost gone the resulting sobriety feels lower and more down than you would otherwise feel. It is noticeable.

It's not necessarily addictive, to the extent that the withdrawal symptoms are weak as compared with a hard drug or even habitual drinking, but there certainly are symptoms that exist when you move from heavy smoking to infrequent or quitting altogether.

This person though, this was covered by jayelectricity.

Seems to me like this isn't much different from feeling a lemonade craving if you got used to having delicious lemonade after a hard day's work in the sun.


You're not very bright, are you?
 
2012-11-19 03:31:57 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: TabASlotB: Headso: TabASlotB: . The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco

yeah like 100% less for mortality...

Only if the only measure of mortality is overdose. But nobody ever dies from a nicotine overdose, either...completely undermining your point.

I cited actual studies above. If you're just going to be disingenuous, I'll find others worth talking to.

http://articles.latimes.com/1995-05-14/news/mn-968_1_linda-curry

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicotine_poisoning


Fascinating. Nicotine poisoning for the life insurance payout...what a way to go. Still, my larger point stands: nicotine--as used in recreational form--has resulted in a vanishingly small number of lethal overdoses (to the point that it could be treated as negligible risk). This is similar to cannabis, and in contrast to alcohol. The morbidity and mortality of each of these drugs, however, is not limited to overdose.
 
2012-11-19 03:32:23 PM  
What does heroin feel like -Reddit- http://www.sickchirpse.com/2012/07/29/heroin-addiction/

Now in hotlinked form, since people never bother to copy and paste links.
 
2012-11-19 03:43:56 PM  

SkunkWerks: So, near as I can tell, no one has ever died from nicotine poisoning by way of smoking cigarettes. This may factor into the debate you're currently having somehow, I think.


Cancer?

TabASlotB: Fascinating. Nicotine poisoning for the life insurance payout...what a way to go. Still, my larger point stands: nicotine--as used in recreational form--has resulted in a vanishingly small number of lethal overdoses (to the point that it could be treated as negligible risk). This is similar to cannabis, and in contrast to alcohol. The morbidity and mortality of each of these drugs, however, is not limited to overdose.


I personally don't have a horse in this race. However I have read some other studies about traffic accidents that points in the opposite direction you are pushing... I don't feel like searching for them now, but I'm willing to go out on a limb and say that drugs that are considered "downers" (Alcohol, opiates, oxy) are SIGNIFICANTLY linked with fatalities in motor vehicles, while uppers (marijuana, amphetimines, caffeine, nicotine) have overall lower death by accident rates to the point that the numbers could be statistical noise.
 
2012-11-19 04:03:14 PM  

doubled99: Why does everyone keep saying "he". It's a woman.


because they're my mom.
who always calls my cats "she" when they are actually neutered male.
 
2012-11-19 04:32:17 PM  

Jon iz teh kewl: who always calls my cats "she" when they are actually neutered male.


same thing
 
2012-11-19 04:33:23 PM  

SmellsLikePoo: SkunkWerks: So, near as I can tell, no one has ever died from nicotine poisoning by way of smoking cigarettes. This may factor into the debate you're currently having somehow, I think.

Cancer?


Not an overdose, as the word is typically used. An overdose explicitly states that there is a "safe" dose that was exceeded; assuming there is some non-zero "safe" dose for tobacco smoke, it's not really clear when that line would be crossed in a thirty year pack-a-day habit. Certainly tobacco smoke is the ultimate cause of many lung cancer and cardiovascular deaths, but "nicotine poisoning" is a term reserved for acute toxic exposures. Similarly, "alcohol poisoning" is typically used to refer to an acute overdose but not cirrhosis of the liver or a DUI traffic fatality. The terms are fuzzy, so you could argue it, but it'd be semantics...bottom line: an overdose is generally understood to be a primary toxicity, not morbidity/mortality secondary to an exposure.

SmellsLikePoo:I personally don't have a horse in this race. However I have read some other studies about traffic accidents that points in the opposite direction you are pushing... I don't feel like searching for them now, but I'm willing to go out on a limb and say that drugs that are considered "downers" (Alcohol, opiates, oxy) are SIGNIFICANTLY linked with fatalities in motor vehicles, while uppers (marijuana, amphetimines, caffeine, nicotine) have overall lower death by accident rates to the point that the numbers could be statistical noise.

Marijuana is not generally considered an "upper" in the strictest sense...cannabis intoxication contains elements of stimulant, depressant & hallucinogenic effects, and these effects are going to vary between individuals, strains and dosage consumed. Above I cited a 2012 Lancet review of the available evidence that characterized the findings as showing an effect "across cross-sectional studies, representative population-based, or case-control studies". Here's the PubMed link and a relevant quote:
Cannabis use impairs cognitive and behavioural functions, especially for sustained-attention tasks, so the risk of road-traffic accidents can increase if users drive while intoxicated. Controlled studies have recorded statistically significant deficits in driving performance, but studies under more realistic road conditions report more impairment to a lesser extent. Case-control studies have recorded weak associations between cannabis use and culpability for road-traffic accidents, with higher risks in individuals who use more cannabis.These risks are less than those for alcohol, and fewer drivers use cannabis-the estimated proportion of road-traffic accidents attributable to cannabis in France between 2001 and 2003 was 3% (vs 30% for alcohol). The relative contribution of cannabis use to road-traffic accidents will vary between countries according to the prevalence of cannabis use and access to motor vehicles.
That data aren't unequivocal, but the biological plausibility of increased motor vehicle accident risk is there and the general trend seems to support some moderately increased risk for intoxicated drivers.
 
2012-11-19 04:41:52 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

Last week I decided to not smoke. Started on Monday, and by Thursday I actually remembered my first dream. Too bad it was a farking nightmare that terrified me (stupid ass clowns). Made me regret ever wanting to remember that crap.

/No withdrawal symptoms


One of the reasons I cant stop smoking weed is because I have frequent and highly vivid nightmares when I do. I've spoken with a therapist more than once about it.
 
2012-11-19 05:08:14 PM  

Sublime_Influence: scottydoesntknow: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

Last week I decided to not smoke. Started on Monday, and by Thursday I actually remembered my first dream. Too bad it was a farking nightmare that terrified me (stupid ass clowns). Made me regret ever wanting to remember that crap.

/No withdrawal symptoms

One of the reasons I cant stop smoking weed is because I have frequent and highly vivid nightmares when I do. I've spoken with a therapist more than once about it.


Huh, I have you favorited, but no idea why (usually I put a reason for it). You're in green, so I'll assume you said something smart about weed.
 
2012-11-19 05:19:16 PM  

Sublime_Influence: scottydoesntknow: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

Last week I decided to not smoke. Started on Monday, and by Thursday I actually remembered my first dream. Too bad it was a farking nightmare that terrified me (stupid ass clowns). Made me regret ever wanting to remember that crap.

/No withdrawal symptoms

One of the reasons I cant stop smoking weed is because I have frequent and highly vivid nightmares when I do. I've spoken with a therapist more than once about it.


Reading things like this makes me want to try to become a daily smoker for a while. I bet there are some good stories that could come out of those nightmares. Or paintings/drawings, if you're the artistic type.

/don't have a reliable enough supply for that though; 1-2 times a week does me fine
 
2012-11-19 05:21:46 PM  
Ha, I also have you Favorited in green. No idea why. If it helps, I wandered my college campus collecting signatures for I-502 here in WA.
 
2012-11-19 05:31:06 PM  
^^ Whoops the above post I made was for Scotty. Jubeebee, I had nightmares before I ever started smoking weed. Something about having an abusive meth addict stepfather, Oxycontin addicted actual father, and some zealous baptist grandparents.

/To sum it up shortly.
//Therapists have field days with me.
 
2012-11-19 05:35:20 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

You don't remember your dreams when you get stoned? I've never heard of that.


Very rarely. My theory is you just sleep too soundly to come out of things while in REM so don't recall the dreams. I stopped several months ago after ~15 years of daily. I have dreams like crazy now, both good and bad.

Other than the dreams I had no side effects at all when quitting. I haven't really noticed any upside so I can't really recommend it (quitting). Actually I suppose I'm saving money but after 15 years that had pretty much worked itself smoothly into the budget.
 
2012-11-19 05:55:26 PM  

Sublime_Influence: Ha, I also have you Favorited in green. No idea why. If it helps, I wandered my college campus collecting signatures for I-502 here in WA.


Haha, awesome.

/Great minds smoke alike
 
2012-11-19 06:02:13 PM  
Satanic_Hamster:

Have you ever sucked dick for weed, man?

No but I've let people get me high so I'll let them blow me.
 
2012-11-19 06:04:33 PM  
Jument:

She should take up drinking, then.

Taking up drinking is one of the best decisions I ever made. It might be different if I hadn't waited till age 42 to start drinking every evening though.
 
2012-11-19 06:07:23 PM  
Cary Tennis,

You are terrible at giving advice. Simply awful. Your self-indulgent rant to ex-pot girl was enough to send her on to try heroin. I pity anyone that seeks out your advice. Please do the right thing and let someone who wants to help people take over the column.

The One True TheDavid: Satanic_Hamster:

Have you ever sucked dick for weed, man?

No but I've let people get me high so I'll let them blow me.


yeah sure right. you would like to believe that.
 
2012-11-19 06:28:45 PM  
Easiest vice I ever quit. Not that I was a wake 'n bake/ounce every 2 days-type stoner/loser.

No, really.
 
2012-11-19 06:48:11 PM  
Since I don't have a shrink, I'll share the following with you guys/gals.

I smoke weed everyday after work - have been for the past 4 years. In those 4 years, I have gone from making $60K a year to over $250K a year. Not sure if one has anything to do with the other, but all I know is that while I've been smoking my financial well being has taken off. End result: I don't plan on quitting any time soon.

Do I recommend everyone smoke to make more money? Of course not, it's just worked for me.


/On a side note: I now have the most incredible work-related ideas in the middle of the night on evenings that I've smoked.
 
2012-11-19 06:53:58 PM  

8 inches: Since I don't have a shrink, I'll share the following with you guys/gals.

I smoke weed everyday after work - have been for the past 4 years. In those 4 years, I have gone from making $60K a year to over $250K a year. Not sure if one has anything to do with the other, but all I know is that while I've been smoking my financial well being has taken off. End result: I don't plan on quitting any time soon.

Do I recommend everyone smoke to make more money? Of course not, it's just worked for me.


/On a side note: I now have the most incredible work-related ideas in the middle of the night on evenings that I've smoked.


while i whole-heartedly endorse the use of greenery, that is correlation, not causation--unless you are in the business of taste-testing kinds for your dispensary and sales have skyrocketed as a result.

but it lends more to causation as an argument for stress and anxiety reduction that leaves you happier and more productive at work. pot is way better than prescription anxiety meds, imo.
 
2012-11-19 07:03:54 PM  

olddinosaur: Hogwash.

Marijuana is not physically addictive in the biochemical sense. Extremely heavy users may suffer some irratibility when it is withdrawn, but nothing like the sdymptoms which accompany withdrawal from narcotics, alcohol or niccotine.

What he is saying is, he is an attention whore, and so totally wrapped up in himself that he expects others to take him as seriously as he takes himself.

Fat chance.


Cocaine isn't physically addictive either. That doesn't mean you don't REALLY want it once it's not there.
 
2012-11-19 07:12:38 PM  

LL316: olddinosaur: Hogwash.

Marijuana is not physically addictive in the biochemical sense. Extremely heavy users may suffer some irratibility when it is withdrawn, but nothing like the sdymptoms which accompany withdrawal from narcotics, alcohol or niccotine.

What he is saying is, he is an attention whore, and so totally wrapped up in himself that he expects others to take him as seriously as he takes himself.

Fat chance.

Cocaine isn't physically addictive either. That doesn't mean you don't REALLY want it once it's not there.


This.
 
2012-11-19 07:14:51 PM  

Gunny Highway: Dragonflew: The My Little Pony Killer: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

You don't remember your dreams when you get stoned? I've never heard of that.

Likely because it's bullshiat.

Is it? There is a lot of evidence in this thread that suggests it isnt bullshiat.


I smoke copious amounts of weed, and I remember my dreams. I am also a lucid dreamer, so maybe I am wired differently, who knows?
 
2012-11-19 07:30:02 PM  

TabASlotB: But nobody ever dies from a nicotine overdose, either


No one? Ever?

Link

That's just one example. So I ask you, were you simply ignorant or intentionally lying when you wrote the above?
 
2012-11-19 07:38:58 PM  

Dr Dreidel: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?


Last time I quit I started back because of the waking dreams. I hate that I trained myself to be conscious in dreams as a teenager. Can't turn it off now, but when I smoke they don't show up. Maybe I'll quit again just for kicks, but life is going too well right now to mess it up. Smoke all day but have a great job that I love, great wife that I love (she almost never touches the stuff), and, since I'm in Los Angeles, almost zero worry about any sort of criminal ramifications.

Only thing I wish I wasn't doing was "smoking" the stuff, but that's the habit.. as an ex-tobacco smoker I guess I learned a few Freudian truths that I haven't quite shaken just yet.

And yeah, the author of the response probably spends a lot of time at AA meetings...
 
2012-11-19 07:50:08 PM  

untaken_name: Uh, what's the problem? Just start smoking again and everything goes back to normal. Duh.


Maybe they live in CO or WA so it's not cool anymore because it's not illegal.
 
2012-11-19 08:25:46 PM  
Disassociation is your only hope.
 
2012-11-19 08:30:19 PM  
Reading through this thread I'd SWEAR not ONE of you farkers has EVER smoked weed.
 
2012-11-19 08:52:56 PM  
I smoked a sheet ton of weed daily for decades. Then I moved to a rural location and could no longer get it. Going cold turkey, after decades, involved about 48 hours of fatigue and irritability. Gee, what an ordeal. Such an addictive drug.
 
2012-11-19 09:08:06 PM  
cry me a f*cking river.
 
2012-11-19 09:11:54 PM  
Yeah, we're going to see an upswing of these kinds of articles after the Colorado and Washington votes.

Abuse of any kind of recreational drug isn't healthy. However, you don't typically see hardcore pot users knocking over pharmacies for their next fix or committing home invasions to support their habit.

It's still a "gateway drug" right? Not the perfectly legal painkillers like Oxycotin, the downers like Xanax or the kiddie-meth like Adderall right? Those drugs are perfectly non-habit forming and have never lead to dependence or full blown addiction right?

A request to the moron in the article: Try quitting booze or benzodiazepines after a substantial long-term period of abuse. A grand mal seizure or a nasty case of the DT's might change your perspective. Or you'll just swallow your tongue and we won't have to hear your bullshiat anymore.
 
2012-11-19 09:30:24 PM  

TabASlotB: Headso: TabASlotB: . The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco

yeah like 100% less for mortality...

Only if the only measure of mortality is overdose. But nobody ever dies from a nicotine overdose, either...completely undermining your point.

I cited actual studies above. If you're just going to be disingenuous, I'll find others worth talking to.


You're just going to ignore COPD and lung cancer? Okay.
 
2012-11-19 09:45:45 PM  
I smoke a lot, and always remember dreams. Lucid dreaming is pretty common for me too.

Some people say they dont dream, or never remember them. Regardless of smoking or not.

I guess my mileage varies.
 
2012-11-19 11:27:12 PM  

LoneWolf343: TabASlotB: Headso: TabASlotB: . The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco

yeah like 100% less for mortality...

Only if the only measure of mortality is overdose. But nobody ever dies from a nicotine overdose, either...completely undermining your point.

I cited actual studies above. If you're just going to be disingenuous, I'll find others worth talking to.

You're just going to ignore COPD and lung cancer? Okay.


As well as ignoring actual deaths from literal nicotine overdoses, it appears that yes, the plan it to ignore those also.
 
2012-11-19 11:41:06 PM  
I was a heavy smoker for about 20 years. I am too old to know anyone who sells pot anymore since I lost both of my connections last year. Now pot is a distant memory, and I hate going without it, but I can't be bothered to go out and find another one. If someone showed up with a joint I would smoke the hell out of it, though. I can't say I notice a whole lot of difference between being high all the time and not being high all the time except that I don't have that awful experience of getting high early in the day on the last of a supply and having it wear off leaving me irritable until I get to go to bed. And that I suddenly have a lot of time on my hands, which I've been filling by doing volunteer work. I will say I honestly believe that when they legalize it here that I will not feel compelled to smoke as much since there won't be the same sense of "enjoy this now because you never know when you'll get some more." I mean, I keep alcohol and food in the house without consuming all of it in as short an amount of time as possible.

P.S. The answer to that question in the article sucked. What a windbag that expert is.
 
2012-11-20 12:04:55 AM  
On the dream thing, I think pot has the same impact on your short term memory while you're asleep that it does when you're awake. Memories have a harder time forming, so things blur together and dreams don't survive the passage to consciousness as easily.
 
2012-11-20 12:18:46 AM  
They noticed weed suppressed dreaming to a great extent back at the dream lab at UIC around the beginning of the eighties. Probably called UICC back then. People on weed just didn't go into deep REM. some dreamt at atypical times, other simply stopped dreaming. I believe all drugs but Fentanyl should be legal for recreational use, but this cannabis suppresses dreams thing has been clinical knowledge for some time.
 
2012-11-20 12:37:34 AM  
Anyone reading this and saying "what a crock of shiat" has never smoked for a long time and quit pot

Is it possible to smoke pot in a healthy recreational way and not have it become a problem? absolutely

but for many people including myself that is not the case, and this story is almost exactly what I went through when I quit

I was depressed verging on suicidal for about a week after I quit, but not feel a lot better about myself and even in the two months I have haven't been smoking my life has improved in many significant ways

I think anyone reading this as an "attack on pot" is misreading it, I don't see that anywhere in the letter the man wrote.
 
2012-11-20 06:45:47 AM  

charmingkiddo: I think anyone reading this as an "attack on pot" is misreading it


I think anyone who reads this as an "attack on pot" has very weird ideas about whether or not inanimate objects can be "attacked".

They also probably read a lot of things as "attacks on pot".
 
2012-11-20 06:48:22 AM  

SmellsLikePoo: Cancer?


That would be dying of Cancer.
 
2012-11-20 07:12:43 AM  

untaken_name: LoneWolf343: TabASlotB: Headso: TabASlotB: . The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco

yeah like 100% less for mortality...

Only if the only measure of mortality is overdose. But nobody ever dies from a nicotine overdose, either...completely undermining your point.

I cited actual studies above. If you're just going to be disingenuous, I'll find others worth talking to.

You're just going to ignore COPD and lung cancer? Okay.

As well as ignoring actual deaths from literal nicotine overdoses, it appears that yes, the plan it to ignore those also.


There's more of the thread. Read it.
 
2012-11-20 10:58:13 AM  

TabASlotB: untaken_name: LoneWolf343: TabASlotB: Headso: TabASlotB: . The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco

yeah like 100% less for mortality...

Only if the only measure of mortality is overdose. But nobody ever dies from a nicotine overdose, either...completely undermining your point.

I cited actual studies above. If you're just going to be disingenuous, I'll find others worth talking to.

You're just going to ignore COPD and lung cancer? Okay.

As well as ignoring actual deaths from literal nicotine overdoses, it appears that yes, the plan it to ignore those also.

There's more of the thread. Read it.


And since I actually have time now, I'll elaborate and point out some important details.
As I said here, the term "overdose," while somewhat fuzzy, is generally used for a primary toxic event. This can be acute exposure or chronic accumulation, but the key is that the toxic component(s) directly cause illness (e.g., organ failure). When a chronic exposure results in a secondary medical problem, such as lung cancer following years of smoking or mesothelioma following asbestos exposure, it's not typically referred to as an overdose. I am in no way implying that tobacco doesn't cause COPD, lung cancer or any of the other numerous maladies clearly causally established to result from long-term tobacco use!

I know that nicotine can cause acute toxicity, sometimes fatal. My point was that recreational use of tobacco isn't known to result in fatal overdoses of nicotine (and every example of fatal nicotine overdose I've seen is outside of the realm of a smoker going overboard like a heroin addict or alcoholic might with their drugs of choice). Why did I bring up this seemingly obvious point? Because Headso made the claim that mortality associated with cannabis is zero. This is flatly contradicted by the academic studies I posted above. The only way the assertion that cannabis has 0% mortality risk (apparently ignoring morbidity) is remotely plausible in the face of this evidence is if mortality is limited to only overdose events. THC is well-known to have an LD50 well beyond what what anyone is likely to be exposed to in a recreational setting; this is certainly in contrast to heroin, coke, alcohol, etc. However, it's very similar to recreational tobacco use in this regard; both have effectively negligible recreational overdose risk.

As an aside, it is not actually clear that cannabis exposure hasn't been a direct cause of fatal medical events in rare cases. There are sparse case studies that suggest a very small number of fatalities are highly temporally correlated with, and plausibly result from, cannabis exposure. (1, 2) These are cardiovascular events, possibly triggered by the vasodialative and tachycardic effects commonly associated with smoking cannabis; these cases didn't identify any underlying cardiovascular or cerebrovascular pathologies that were "triggered" by cannabis exposure, but it can't be ruled out. Whether you'd consider them "overdoses" would depend on your definition of the term. I am merely asking for consistency in language and honesty in discussion.

Finally, allow me to return to a point from my original posting. There is a lot of misinformation about the benefits and risks of cannabis, and it comes from both sides of the debate. It's a drug that is vastly understudied in comparison to tobacco or alcohol, and even to cocaine and heroin. The available evidence does, however, show non-zero morbidity and mortality risks, including developing dependence, all of which are highly variable between individuals and highly dependent on lifetime patterns of use. The cannabis enthusiasts that argue that the drug is completely safe are presenting a comfortable fiction to themselves and others that is simply not compatible with the best scientific evidence. As I also said, there are contemporary--and certainly some historical--overstatements of the drug's risks from the prohibitionist side, sometimes dramatically and insultingly so. As a scientist, i believe the best counter to misinformation is accurate information, not misinformation in the opposite direction.
 
2012-11-20 12:34:13 PM  

jaylectricity: Any advice would be welcome.

Stop blaming cannabis. You were in need of a life change and instead of doing it through positivity you chose drugs to fix it.


Done in one; externalizing your problems (e.g., by blaming them on something other than your own actions) ==> never resolving them.
 
2012-11-20 08:17:46 PM  

TabASlotB: My point was that recreational use of tobacco isn't known to result in fatal overdoses of nicotine (and every example of fatal nicotine overdose I've seen is outside of the realm of a smoker going overboard like a heroin addict or alcoholic might with their drugs of choice)


No, that may have been what you intended your point to be. But that isn't what you said. I'm sorry if you didn't articulate your ideas properly. But that really isn't my fault.
 
2012-11-21 10:31:39 AM  

untaken_name: TabASlotB: My point was that recreational use of tobacco isn't known to result in fatal overdoses of nicotine (and every example of fatal nicotine overdose I've seen is outside of the realm of a smoker going overboard like a heroin addict or alcoholic might with their drugs of choice)

No, that may have been what you intended your point to be. But that isn't what you said. I'm sorry if you didn't articulate your ideas properly. But that really isn't my fault.


And I'm sorry you couldn't be arsed to read the two posts prior to your "gotchya" that addressed and clarified my own admittedly unclear word-choice. But missing the forest for the trees in your rush to sanctimony is more your problem than mine.
 
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