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(Salon)   Man says he was "addicted" to pot and now that he quit, he is "feeling weird" and that a chemical dependency is negatively impacting him   (salon.com) divider line 208
    More: Dumbass, acquiescence  
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7886 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Nov 2012 at 11:04 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-19 12:46:37 PM  

Hrist: Well, the reason I mention these things is because those drugs have some kind of benefit for sufferers of various conditions than they do other people.


I get that. But you're also pretty starkly implying that people with such needs somehow know naturally (without any scientific understanding of what they have or what they're taking to "remedy" it) to gravitate towards these things- as if they have some sort of deep knowledge of their particular deficiencies, of chemistry, and of how to best balance themselves- simply because they have deficiencies.

In all my experience around people with ADD/ADHD (and I've had quite a lot, both as a sufferer myself and as a spectator) I've never seen that this is so. Though I have seen plenty of addicts use it as a lame excuse for what they do.

Again, if there's a study out there that suggests people have some sort of bizarro "spider sense" with regards to illicit solutions to complex neuro chemical issues, I'd be interested to see it. Otherwise it just seems to mostly be a convenient excuse to me.


It seems far more likely to me that people who were dealt a bad hand in the biological department tend to get themselves into trouble more, trouble which would include- among other things- substance abuse. The instances where an abused substance actually dovetails with the chemical needs of the abuser seems more like a happy accident than some sort of divine providence to me.
 
2012-11-19 12:48:24 PM  
Hopefully legalization will erode away the stoner stigma, and make the average person realize we aren't all shiatlocked trustafarians with poorly groomed facial hair, red eyes and a penchant for lazily accentuating our vowels (duuuude, brooooo)
Everyday people who don't happen to revolve their lives around marijuana still enjoy marijuana
 
2012-11-19 12:52:13 PM  

Dirtybird971: I don't have to imagine it. I lived it for nearly a decade. And it's still just an excuse. nearly everyday during that time I KNEW IT WAS ME DOING IT TO MYSELF. I'm not saying it wasn't tough, most people don't live through it, but EVERYDAY there was a moment of clarity when I said, "you know you don't have to do this" but i did anyway. I was forsaking all other things to the point of losing 45 lbs, being homeless for 2 years and living in a bathroom of a gas station. I still had a job waitering, so I didn't have to resort to crime or prostitution, but it wasn't easy. However, I choose to continue and everyone has a choice. Had i been there when they started to whine I'd say the same to them. Like my mom used to say "you made your bed, now lie in it."


I didn't. Know. Your brain can rationalize to an amazing degree, especially if you're drunk all the time. I'd been on the streets for a couple of years before I suddenly realized, "You know, no matter where you go and what you do, your problem isn't your location. It's that you're a drunk."

And after that it was no fun anymore, and I did quit. Still took me a couple more years, a trip to rehab, another DUI, and feeling like shiat most of the time, but I did finally quit. But for most of my time drinking, I didn't really "know" that the alcohol was causing my problems. And there are plenty of addicts just like i was. Sometimes support groups can help them come to grips with the fact that they're the problem--whatever's going on in their heads. it's not just life has dealt them a shiat hand, like I thought for a long time.

You aren't the only clean addict in the world, you know.  AA probably helped save my life.
 
2012-11-19 12:56:36 PM  
Dope is for dopes
Drugs are for dummies
And if you mess around with them
That mess isn't funny
 
2012-11-19 12:57:38 PM  
Okay folks, this is actually in my area of expertise...my research is more stimulant-focused (cocaine, methamphetamine), but the mechanisms of addiction key components of my day-to-day. Here are a few things:

1. Anyone claiming that cannabis cannot or does not cause dependence, shut up. You're wrong. Just like with any human-drug combination, the magnitude of the dependence is going to vary widely based on genetics, exposure levels & patterns, co-abuse, and co-morbid psychological conditions.

1a. Likewise, the manner in which one enters the abstinence phase of quitting will dramatically affect withdrawal symptoms. Long-term heavy users will often needs weeks to months for highly lipophilic cannabinoids to clear their systems--this long taper tends to ease the transition to abstinence, but I assure you, an administered CB1 antagonist (e.g., Rimonabant) will make these people feel like complete shiat, not unlike long-time tobacco smokers 36-hours post last cigarette.

2. It is very common for people to "self-medicate" for clinical and sub-clinical psychological disorders using drugs like THC, alcohol, nicotine, and things much harder. This is almost always to the detriment of treating the underlying condition(s) as it merely applies a band-aid to some of the symptoms while creating newer problems, psychologically and medically. If you suspect you are one of these people, you should seek some professional help. You might find that treating the underlying problem actually feels better than the high.

3. While dependence is a quasi-objective measure of the physiological effects of chronic drug-taking, the term addiction is a sociological construct. Simply put, a compulsive behavior becomes an addiction when it starts to interfere with your life. When cannabis use contributes to inadequate or unhealthy relationships or slows the setting and attainment of personal goals (be it work, school, or whatever), you don't need a DSM-IV to identify that it's a problem. Unfortunately, psychological disorders and drugs of abuse can often make it near-impossible for the type of self-reflection necessary to seek such help.

4. Reefer Madness and a lot of the anti-drug hype machine is fear-mongering bullshiat. The gateway hypothesis is pretty much dead as a serious academic topic. That said, don't buy the hype that cannabis is fun & harmless or a panacea for all your medical ailments. Actual effects of cannabis in humans are still woefully understudied and there's minimal good science behind most of the positive non-euphoric claims. As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.
 
2012-11-19 12:59:20 PM  

joonyer: kindms: Well we are certainly seeing a major uptick on the "Evils of Pot" stories and TV spots since election day.

CNN had a spot, the local Fox affiliate has done "reports"

I guess the anti-pot crowd still has some propaganda to spread and some money to burn.

That federal funding isn't going to spend itself now is it?


i49.tinypic.com

http://i49.tinypic.com/2drfdok.gif
 
2012-11-19 01:00:50 PM  
the problem is that this lady has always been farked up
 
2012-11-19 01:00:54 PM  
SkunkWerks

It seems far more likely to me that people who were dealt a bad hand in the biological department tend to get themselves into trouble more, trouble which would include- among other things- substance abuse. The instances where an abused substance actually dovetails with the chemical needs of the abuser seems more like a happy accident than some sort of divine providence to me.


Other factors:

Co-dependency
Family pain
 
2012-11-19 01:02:41 PM  
Actually, typically, dope mavins test superior biometrically.
 
2012-11-19 01:03:19 PM  
Reading some of this stuff makes me glad i seem to be immune to most withdrawal and side effects from any drug.

/Has had to take many different meds in my life
//was on oxy for pain for almost 3 months
///stopped cold turkey
////was in college at the time and did perfectly fine!
//Addicted to slashies though!
 
2012-11-19 01:04:11 PM  

bmwericus: jfivealive: Am i the only one that thinks the salon just got trolled by someone bored and stoned?

You mean the original letter writer, or the response, which I think read like a guy really ripped. Read like one of my essays in college when I was ripped to the bejesus belt...

Some people get high and DO things, some get high and do nothing, depends on the person and the weed it seems.


Back when I smoked, pot made me want to get outside and enjoy the world. I used to love hiking with a good buzz.
 
2012-11-19 01:04:14 PM  

blahpers: Seems to me like this isn't much different from feeling a lemonade craving if you got used to having delicious lemonade after a hard day's work in the sun.


More or less! I would feel a little low, tired, sort of humdrum. A very extremely apathetic feeling, more than when actually high. It went away after a day or two.
 
2012-11-19 01:05:26 PM  
Man in article is a woman? Maybe they're in a gay relationship but there's no real mention of the writer's gender.

FTFA: Both my husband and I were serious pot smokers, pretty much 24/7 for the last eight years or so. 

/subby fail?
 
2012-11-19 01:05:56 PM  

TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.


comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.
 
2012-11-19 01:06:15 PM  

TabASlotB: 4. Reefer Madness and a lot of the anti-drug hype machine is fear-mongering bullshiat. The gateway hypothesis is pretty much dead as a serious academic topic. That said, don't buy the hype that cannabis is fun & harmless or a panacea for all your medical ailments. Actual effects of cannabis in humans are still woefully understudied and there's minimal good science behind most of the positive non-euphoric claims. As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.


Dude, you might want to see a doctor. You just turned green for some reason.
 
2012-11-19 01:07:03 PM  
going sober can be quite an experience.

I highly recommend it.

Any advice? Drink lots of water. Give it time.

It took my brain at least three months to thaw out and then it took about 3 years for my attitude to fully adjust to my new reality.
 
2012-11-19 01:08:16 PM  

cryinoutloud


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2012-11-19 12:52:13 PM

Dirtybird971: I don't have to imagine it. I lived it for nearly a decade. And it's still just an excuse. nearly everyday during that time I KNEW IT WAS ME DOING IT TO MYSELF. I'm not saying it wasn't tough, most people don't live through it, but EVERYDAY there was a moment of clarity when I said, "you know you don't have to do this" but i did anyway. I was forsaking all other things to the point of losing 45 lbs, being homeless for 2 years and living in a bathroom of a gas station. I still had a job waitering, so I didn't have to resort to crime or prostitution, but it wasn't easy. However, I choose to continue and everyone has a choice. Had i been there when they started to whine I'd say the same to them. Like my mom used to say "you made your bed, now lie in it."

I didn't. Know. Your brain can rationalize to an amazing degree, especially if you're drunk all the time. I'd been on the streets for a couple of years before I suddenly realized, "You know, no matter where you go and what you do, your problem isn't your location. It's that you're a drunk."

And after that it was no fun anymore, and I did quit. Still took me a couple more years, a trip to rehab, another DUI, and feeling like shiat most of the time, but I did finally quit. But for most of my time drinking, I didn't really "know" that the alcohol was causing my problems. And there are plenty of addicts just like i was. Sometimes support groups can help them come to grips with the fact that they're the problem--whatever's going on in their heads. it's not just life has dealt them a shiat hand, like I thought for a long time.

You aren't the only clean addict in the world, you know. AA probably helped save my life.


I don't mean to make light of your pain, I'm glad you found a reason to get clean too but accepting personal responsibility is a hallmark/cornerstone of an addict, no matter the drug. I wouldn't call it rationalization, you liked drinking or being drunk just like I loved being high on heroin. Everything was better or at least you couldn't tell how shaitty you'd(i'd) made it. But I didn't get much support from the groups. Generally, they were cliques and if you weren't one of them you were shunned. Maybe you were one of them, either way I'm glad you found your peace.
 
2012-11-19 01:09:53 PM  
 
2012-11-19 01:10:03 PM  

SkunkWerks: Hrist: Well, the reason I mention these things is because those drugs have some kind of benefit for sufferers of various conditions than they do other people.

I get that. But you're also pretty starkly implying that people with such needs somehow know naturally (without any scientific understanding of what they have or what they're taking to "remedy" it) to gravitate towards these things- as if they have some sort of deep knowledge of their particular deficiencies, of chemistry, and of how to best balance themselves- simply because they have deficiencies.

In all my experience around people with ADD/ADHD (and I've had quite a lot, both as a sufferer myself and as a spectator) I've never seen that this is so. Though I have seen plenty of addicts use it as a lame excuse for what they do.

Again, if there's a study out there that suggests people have some sort of bizarro "spider sense" with regards to illicit solutions to complex neuro chemical issues, I'd be interested to see it. Otherwise it just seems to mostly be a convenient excuse to me.


It seems far more likely to me that people who were dealt a bad hand in the biological department tend to get themselves into trouble more, trouble which would include- among other things- substance abuse. The instances where an abused substance actually dovetails with the chemical needs of the abuser seems more like a happy accident than some sort of divine providence to me.


There really isn't something as clear cut as a spidey sense for what drug you need. People with 'problems' are more likely to try illegal drugs, which means they have a higher chance of encountering something that is both fun and helps with the problem in some way.

I'm just making statistical predictions. All other factors held the same, people should prefer the drug that is the most beneficial to them in the end, in terms of treatment/recreation, not speaking strictly of their health.
 
2012-11-19 01:12:04 PM  

Headso: TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.

comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.


and you obviously have never been addicted to anything.
 
2012-11-19 01:15:18 PM  

Dirtybird971: cryinoutloud


Smartest
Funniest

2012-11-19 12:52:13 PM

Dirtybird971: I don't have to imagine it. I lived it for nearly a decade. And it's still just an excuse. nearly everyday during that time I KNEW IT WAS ME DOING IT TO MYSELF. I'm not saying it wasn't tough, most people don't live through it, but EVERYDAY there was a moment of clarity when I said, "you know you don't have to do this" but i did anyway. I was forsaking all other things to the point of losing 45 lbs, being homeless for 2 years and living in a bathroom of a gas station. I still had a job waitering, so I didn't have to resort to crime or prostitution, but it wasn't easy. However, I choose to continue and everyone has a choice. Had i been there when they started to whine I'd say the same to them. Like my mom used to say "you made your bed, now lie in it."

I didn't. Know. Your brain can rationalize to an amazing degree, especially if you're drunk all the time. I'd been on the streets for a couple of years before I suddenly realized, "You know, no matter where you go and what you do, your problem isn't your location. It's that you're a drunk."

And after that it was no fun anymore, and I did quit. Still took me a couple more years, a trip to rehab, another DUI, and feeling like shiat most of the time, but I did finally quit. But for most of my time drinking, I didn't really "know" that the alcohol was causing my problems. And there are plenty of addicts just like i was. Sometimes support groups can help them come to grips with the fact that they're the problem--whatever's going on in their heads. it's not just life has dealt them a shiat hand, like I thought for a long time.

You aren't the only clean addict in the world, you know. AA probably helped save my life.

I don't mean to make light of your pain, I'm glad you found a reason to get clean too but accepting personal responsibility is a hallmark/cornerstone of an addict, no matter the drug. I wouldn't call it rationalization, you liked drinking or being drunk just like I loved being high on heroin. Everything was better or at least you couldn't tell how shaitty you'd(i'd) made it. But I didn't get much support from the groups. Generally, they were cliques and if you weren't one of them you were shunned. Maybe you were one of them, either way I'm glad you found your peace.


Rationalization is a HUGE part of addiction. What usually gets people started on pain pills is rationalization. You take your week supply as directed. You don't want to BE in pain..rational thought. So you keep taking it as not to be in pain. Even if the source of the pain has cleared up, you don't want to take that chance. By the time you're out with no refills you've got a little monkey on your back and WILL be in pain when you stop. So you'll ask for more.
 
2012-11-19 01:16:16 PM  

Headso: TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.

comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.

 

Chemically, you are correct.

If you are a really dedicated pot head, and I was, then you have a certain outlook on life and things. Once you quit, you might get some headaches or whatnot, nothing too bad, nothing that can't be dealt with using Ibuprofen.

I was high for about 10 years, the last five years I smoked weed alot. I was high every day for five years. I woke up in the middle of the night to smoke. I smoked right before work, on lunch and on the drive home from work. At one point I was driving around with a water bong the size of a coke can in my car's cup holder. I was a weed missionary. Anyway. After that long living in that reality, sobering up can be a little disturbing.

I'm just saying give the guy some slack...
 
2012-11-19 01:16:32 PM  
What the remedy for fark addiction? A good cockpunching?
 
2012-11-19 01:18:23 PM  
By and large I have surely enjoyed the sociality of cannabis: A joint between chess games, at breaks in bike rides, sharing cultivation tips. I was pretty solotonic before I baked.
 
2012-11-19 01:18:55 PM  

thrgd456: going sober can be quite an experience.

I highly recommend it.

Any advice? Drink lots of water. Give it time.

It took my brain at least three months to thaw out and then it took about 3 years for my attitude to fully adjust to my new reality.


The real trick to getting the most out of pot is to let your brain settle in between sessions of getting high. The problem with most stoners is that they smoke every day, so basically getting high is just maintaining, their brain always seems pretty much the same. If you only get high 1-2 times a week, however, each time you get high is much stronger, as you have a baseline of normality to compare things to and your brain's chemical supply is replenished fully.
 
2012-11-19 01:20:13 PM  

suthrnrunt: Headso: TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.

comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.

and you obviously have never been addicted to anything.


I'm addicted to my morning coffee first and foremost but I also smoke pot, which I could take or leave depending on if I feel like smoking at any given time or not.
 
2012-11-19 01:24:42 PM  
ANYTHING can be addictive.  Especially when you're using it as a crutch.
 
People get addicted to shopping, and there's no drugs involved there.
 
2012-11-19 01:39:45 PM  

Happy Hours: jaylectricity: Stop blaming cannabis. You were in need of a life change and instead of doing it through positivity you chose drugs to fix it.

Yeah, pretty much this. Too often when anyone has problems with life and smokes pot, the pot gets blamed. If only they hadn't smoked pot their life would be peaches and cream (or unicorns and rainbows).

That's a crock of shiat. Pot doesn't screw up people's lives (and it doesn't lead to success either). There are a whole lot of other things which affect success or failure in life.


This. I smoke, and I'm a lazy son of a biatch. But I was a lazy son of a biatch to begin with before I even discovered the stuff. Pot doesn't "make" you anything, it simply builds upon whatever is already there.

I smoke, and I have flaws, but the flaws are not from smoking, despite what those with specific agendas would like you to believe. I'm not perfect, but I'm not so egotistical as to try to blame my flaws on a scapegoat. We are ultimately responsible for ourselves.
 
2012-11-19 01:41:44 PM  

suthrnrunt: Headso: TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.

comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.

and you obviously have never been addicted to anything.


Not all addictions are created equal.
 
Skr
2012-11-19 01:43:13 PM  
I used to be a big pothead like her, but then I took an arrow to the knee.
 
2012-11-19 01:44:21 PM  

Headso: TabASlotB: As with alcohol and nicotine, treat it like the mixed bag it is.

comparing it to nicotine or alcohol is also reefer madness like. You'd be closer comparing it to addictions like coffee and putting on clothes right out of the dryer.


Curious. Is "putting on clothes right out of the dryer" a compulsion that causes physiological and/or social stress to anyone? No? It's not an addiction.

Caffeine dependence is real--I don't function particularly well without my morning coffee. I have a close collaborator that studies adenosine receptors (the target of caffeine) within the corticolimbic structures of the brain (the pathways that control addiction), trying to figure out how caffeine affects this neural circuitry. Caffeine loses most of its positive subjective value within the first couple of weeks of use and the drive to dependence is driven largely by the negative affect of the withdrawal symptoms--which is rather different from patterns of THC use in humans. Still, as addictions go, very few people have levels of negative physiological and/or social consequences due to compulsive caffeine intake that would support an "addiction" label. The line is fuzzy, but caffeine probably wouldn't cross it for most academics, at least by my estimation of the field.

I suspect your comment was meant to downplay the idea of cannabis as addictive or as causing dependence. As I tried to make clear in my comment, the path to dependence varies widely among individuals, as do the consequences of that dependence. One individual's personal smoking habits does not invalidate the general pattern.
 
2012-11-19 01:50:04 PM  

downstairs: ANYTHING can be addictive.  Especially when you're using it as a crutch.
 
People get addicted to shopping, and there's no drugs involved there.


Or gambling. Same thing. You get a high off winning, or a high off finding a good deal, etc...

We only call such things an addiction if we have some reason to dislike the particular product/activity. Nobody wants to put scientists who spend hours in the lab doing experiments to get a similar high into 12-step programs, but the feeling they get making discoveries is pretty much exactly the same high gamblers get by winning.
 
2012-11-19 01:56:39 PM  
If you wanna be a happy stoner, you have to exercise. Actually, if you want to be a happy anything you have to exercise. I'm about to hike this canyon in 10 minutes. Will legally light up my homegrown during the hike since I'm in Colorado. That's right b*tches, biggest toker state in the Union is also the healthiest.

www.nps.gov
 
2012-11-19 01:57:35 PM  
In related news, there is now a bill beginning to be floated in Texas that will decriminalize marijuana possession of 1oz or less to being the equivalent of a traffic fine.

/crossing my fingers
 
2012-11-19 02:00:38 PM  

TabASlotB: I suspect your comment was meant to downplay the idea of cannabis as addictive or as causing dependence.


My comment was meant to challenge your comparison of pot to two highly addictive chemicals that kill people all the time. You are "up-playing" the idea with your comparisons and I was just tethering it back to reality.
 
2012-11-19 02:01:31 PM  
Why does everyone keep saying "he". It's a woman.
 
2012-11-19 02:01:35 PM  

miscreant: downstairs: ANYTHING can be addictive.  Especially when you're using it as a crutch.
 
People get addicted to shopping, and there's no drugs involved there.

Or gambling. Same thing. You get a high off winning, or a high off finding a good deal, etc...

We only call such things an addiction if we have some reason to dislike the particular product/activity. Nobody wants to put scientists who spend hours in the lab doing experiments to get a similar high into 12-step programs, but the feeling they get making discoveries is pretty much exactly the same high gamblers get by winning.


Actually, there is one unusual difference with gambling compared with the normal dopamine rushes associated with achievement. When a "neurotypical" (for lack of a better term) person wins at gambling, they'll get the rush, but won't get a rush if they lose. However, longer exposures to gambling causes a shift in the dopamine signaling, synching the dopamine releases not with the winning event but the environmental cues at first associated with winning and later just associated with being at the table or slot machine. Over time, gambling addicts get roughly the same rush from losing as they do winning. It's really quite fascinating.

It's quite possible that Professor Graybeard landing his third RO1 and Howard Hughes funding may also get that kind of rush, but I don't think anyone has ever studied it... :)
 
2012-11-19 02:02:57 PM  

Maul555: In related news, there is now a bill beginning to be floated in Texas that will decriminalize marijuana possession of 1oz or less to being the equivalent of a traffic fine.

/crossing my fingers


You got a link?
 
2012-11-19 02:12:12 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Maul555: In related news, there is now a bill beginning to be floated in Texas that will decriminalize marijuana possession of 1oz or less to being the equivalent of a traffic fine.

/crossing my fingers

You got a link?


I just heard about it on the radio this morning... I cant find a link... it was on 1200 WOAI
 
2012-11-19 02:13:29 PM  
nevermind, found a linky
 
2012-11-19 02:14:59 PM  

Dr Dreidel: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

How prevalent is this? I've noticed it, and at least two people I know thought I was a wizard when I asked them (post-quitting) if they started remembering dreams again. Is this one of those things everybody knows but no one talks about?


Yes, this is a common effect of quitting. Not only remembering them but having REALLY VIVID dreams.
 
2012-11-19 02:22:32 PM  

Headso: TabASlotB: I suspect your comment was meant to downplay the idea of cannabis as addictive or as causing dependence.

My comment was meant to challenge your comparison of pot to two highly addictive chemicals that kill people all the time. You are "up-playing" the idea with your comparisons and I was just tethering it back to reality.


Ah, okay. That certainly wasn't clear earlier, but it's a fair point. The morbidity and mortality of cannabis use is probably quite a bit less than alcohol and tobacco. However, cannabis use is only a fraction of alcohol and tobacco and orders of magnitude less-studied. That said, based on the current level of research, cannabis use does have risks. Here are a couple of recent studies:

Acute cannabis consumption is associated with an increased risk of a motor vehicle crash, especially for fatal collisions.
Fold-risk for increased mortality by accident (6.3-10.5), suicide (3.3-7.9), homicide/violence (1.5-7.9), and natural causes (2.0-3.7).
This review places cannabis morbidity and mortality in the context of other illicit drugs and alcohol. In general, it's less well-studied and therefore the risks are less clear across conditions. Accidents, particularly traffic accidents, are clearly elevated and the risk of psychosis (though small) has never gone away no matter how well-controlled the studies get. It's clearly not heroin or meth, but it's not warm, fluffy sweatpants or a mochachino either.
 
2012-11-19 02:22:40 PM  
If you don't like it get out of bat country.
 
2012-11-19 02:26:18 PM  
Came for the rabid and crazy anti-pot rant post.

/leaves disappointed
//what a world, what a world
 
2012-11-19 02:28:00 PM  

Maul555: nevermind, found a linky


Cool, thanks!
 
2012-11-19 02:30:24 PM  
It's called jonesing, and apparently doesn't exist
 
2012-11-19 02:31:14 PM  
Wait, wait, wait...this story is bogus. You can't get addicted to pot. The stoners told me so.
 
2012-11-19 02:36:59 PM  
In a rare moment of seriousness I offer the following from the Journal of Psyciatric medicine:

http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleID=1184217

He might very well "cure" himself with an over the counter vitamin supplement that reduces a deficiency caused cannabis.
 
2012-11-19 02:42:10 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

You don't remember your dreams when you get stoned? I've never heard of that.


Likely because it's bullshiat.
 
2012-11-19 02:44:41 PM  

Dragonflew: The My Little Pony Killer: Gunny Highway: I bet he remembers his dreams now which is cool

You don't remember your dreams when you get stoned? I've never heard of that.

Likely because it's bullshiat.


Is it? There is a lot of evidence in this thread that suggests it isnt bullshiat.
 
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