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(BBC)   Nose cell transplant enables paralysed dogs to walk. This has great potential for helping human spinal cord injuries in the future. Bonus: Test conducted on "real life" injuries, not laboratory animals   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 30
    More: Cool, laboratory animals, olfactory system, bladder control, spinal cord injury, sexual function, proof of concepts  
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5344 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Nov 2012 at 11:01 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-19 08:11:23 AM  
The nose knows.
 
2012-11-19 08:40:33 AM  
I didn't think this could be possible. I even hate looking at dachshunds' x-rays.
 
2012-11-19 08:48:08 AM  
This is good news. Hopefully it'll translate well into treatments for humans. Good news, good news.
 
2012-11-19 09:19:04 AM  
Even better is, since the "real life" injuries were not likely to have been recent injuries, it's probable that further research will show that the age of the injury has no bearing on the efficacy of the treatment. It might take a little longer for the treatment to be fully effective, but this is far more than having no hope at all.

Good news, for people and pets.
 
2012-11-19 11:04:32 AM  
Your dog will run a marathon for steak.
 
2012-11-19 11:04:40 AM  
But how does he smell?
 
2012-11-19 11:04:53 AM  
I've got good news, we can fix your blindness, but we have to go in through your anus.
 
2012-11-19 11:07:19 AM  
i236.photobucket.com

Approves.
 
2012-11-19 11:10:27 AM  
YAY!! WALKING DOG!!! WHEEE!!!!

YOU GUY LITTLE GUY!

I'm sorry - this was the neatest thing I've seen in a while and I'm now in a completely awesome mood.
 
2012-11-19 11:11:09 AM  
Err... "You go, little guy!"

I blame chiclet keyboards.
 
2012-11-19 11:12:42 AM  
Pretty interesting. Hope it's true.
 
2012-11-19 11:13:38 AM  
I DNRTFS, but many dogs with complete transaction can over time develop the ability to do what's called spinal walking. I wonder how they accounted for that.

/why yes, I did do a fellowship in spinal cord injury
 
2012-11-19 11:14:18 AM  
My dog has a nose cell transparent.
How does it smell?

Awful!

/My wife went on holiday.
Jamaica?
Nah, she wanted to go.
 
2012-11-19 11:24:52 AM  
Even if it doesn't work on humans, good for the dogs! I hope it works on humans too, though.
 
2012-11-19 11:41:20 AM  
As a former owner of a weenerdog that ruptured a disk, I'm cheered to see this. Rusty (and I) were lucky to live within driving distance of one of the best canine surgeons in the country, who was willing to operate at 11 p.m. on a Friday. Wasn't cheap, but he recovered fully.
 
2012-11-19 12:09:29 PM  

calm like a bomb: I DNRTFS, but many dogs with complete transaction can over time develop the ability to do what's called spinal walking. I wonder how they accounted for that.

/why yes, I did do a fellowship in spinal cord injury


In the journal linked, it looks like they also did a trial with 6 humans.
They can test sensory response below the injury, as well as document changes in MRI's. Of course, there was also a control group (received an inert injection and treadmill treatments without the particular cells), which presumably would also have the possibility of learning spinal walking - that's exactly the sort of thing you'd expect to filter out by comparison to a control.
 
2012-11-19 12:10:20 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: [i236.photobucket.com image 672x451]

Approves.


Came here to post this; glad to see the efficiency of Fark remains undiminished.
 
2012-11-19 12:12:11 PM  
Read the headline as,..."Test conducted on "real life" injuries, not labrador animals.

Go Science!
 
2012-11-19 12:24:47 PM  

ErinPac: Of course, there was also a control group


I hope they went back and offered the control group the legitimate treatments.

"Yes, we've got a treatment. No, you can't have it." would just suck.
 
2012-11-19 12:43:58 PM  
{csm}

In the early years of heart transplant surgery, the first "necessary" transplant surgery was performed on my cousin's dog.

{/csm}
 
2012-11-19 01:54:02 PM  

Friskya: ErinPac: Of course, there was also a control group

I hope they went back and offered the control group the legitimate treatments.

"Yes, we've got a treatment. No, you can't have it." would just suck.


Well, I doubt that statement would have quite the same depressing effect on dogs. I guess it'd suck for their owners. Really, while yes, sad poor puppy... some dogs seem to do a lot, happily, on their little robo-puppy wheels. I think they tend to adapt better than people *generally*.

Usually a control group (especially for people) still gets the best current care; it's not like they just are doomed. In some experiments, that's the 'good' group - decent care, save money, and less risk. Maybe their owners can spend more on treats and toys if they're paying less vet bills.
 
2012-11-19 02:31:02 PM  
As a disabled person, I hope this moves forward. I'd like them to do this on older injuries, as i've been injured for 10 years and most trials for new treatments want injuries within the past year. I see why, fresh injuries have a better chance of improving, but even just a small amount of regained function would be nice. (not sexual function, that's still good...giggety.)
 
2012-11-19 02:48:26 PM  

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: But how does he smell?

Terrible.
 
2012-11-19 04:36:00 PM  
Came to find out what a human with dog nose cell transplant might look like.

/leaving disappoint.

//Come, JoJo.
 
2012-11-19 05:15:26 PM  
All typical Fark snarkiness aside, that is freaking awesome
 
2012-11-19 05:23:48 PM  
Jesus........ The possibilities were endless..

"What happens when you inject a paralysed dog with nose cells? It runs...."
"How does he smell?"

etc.

OK... Two, TWO possibilities, but I refuse to believe that this was the best headline.
 
2012-11-19 06:24:18 PM  
laboratory animals is sick, sad and unnecessary. a great big Fu(k You to the ACLU. willing volunteer prisoners used to well serve these needs. there is no reason to torture little kritters.

/i hate people
 
2012-11-19 06:33:05 PM  
calm like a bomb: I DNRTFS, but many dogs with complete transaction can over time develop the ability to do what's called spinal walking. I wonder how they accounted for that.

What is "spinal walking" and how do the dog's develop the ability? Is there some sort of training or is it something biological that happens with some dogs?

I volunteer for a large rescue group and we get a lot of injured animals. We've had a few with paralyzed back legs. One was able to regain the ability to walk after surgery. I don't remember the exact nature of the surgery but I know it was highly specialized.

He was a chihuahua, brought in as a stray. He had apparently been on his own for a while, dragging his back half around. He had a large chest and front legs but scrawny back legs. He was like those guys who spend two hours a day weight lifting but never work their legs.
 
2012-11-19 07:29:23 PM  

Phins: What is "spinal walking" and how do the dog's develop the ability? Is there some sort of training or is it something biological that happens with some dogs?


Spinal walking.
 
2012-11-20 08:20:25 AM  

KrispyKritter: laboratory animals is sick, sad and unnecessary. a great big Fu(k You to the ACLU. willing volunteer prisoners used to well serve these needs. there is no reason to torture little kritters.

/i hate people


A quick glance at the leading researcher's CV shows publications using rats, collaborators using mice, and I'd be willing to bet large sums that this technique was tested in laboratory animals, possibly dogs, with induced injuries, before in pets with old injuries.

If anyone thinks that this achievement and others in the medical field aren't made possible by absolutely necessary laboratory animal experimentation and testing, they are horribly naive/ignorant.

/And I understand people think its fun to joke about using prison inmates for research, but if one honestly believes that testing on incarcerated humans is more ethical than animals.... yikes.
 
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