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(The New York Times)   How to live without irony   (opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com) divider line 7
    More: Ironic, how to live  
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7000 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Nov 2012 at 11:55 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-19 09:51:35 AM  
2 votes:
For many Americans born in the 1980s and 1990s - members of Generation Y, or Millennials - particularly middle-class Caucasians, irony is the primary mode with which daily life is dealt.

White people problems.
2012-11-19 06:24:13 PM  
1 votes:

asymptonic: But you can't tell me the first guy to wear a trucker hat Brooklyn loved the style.


Why not? Maybe he didn't go "this looks good." He probably went, "this looks ridiculous on me. I want to look ridiculous." There are things that people like while acknowledging they aren't good. Professional Wrestling, the Mets, etc...

Holocaust Agnostic: Zombalupagus: I've always disliked hipsters but could never quite put a finger on why. That article was very illuminating. If you dress goth, or punk, or grunge or whatever, you're trying to say something. When you dress hipster, you're saying nothing. It's nonconformist I guess, but with nothing to say... just random and meaningless, almost nihilistic. That just feels wrong deep in my psyche. It's like not having a personality.

They weren't saying anything either. All those people grew up and got haircuts and jobs. Bunch of em outright became The Man.

I can see why kids getting their kicks without a self serving hypocritical lie underpinning it would bother someone like that.


Ayup. It's a lot more interesting to talk about what hipsterdom is responding to than it is to talk about why hipsters suck. Gen X saw lots of media blaring at them every two seconds and said "meh. By saying meh, I'm taking a stand against consumerism." Then a few years later, they were the blaring media and the consumers. More or less repeat this pattern for a while.

Today, hipsters see what happened to Gen X and go "screw it. If taking a stand doesn't work, I'll just look like a clown." It's pretty much the right response.
2012-11-19 01:18:29 PM  
1 votes:

abhorrent1: RexTalionis: For many Americans born in the 1980s and 1990s - members of Generation Y, or Millennials - particularly middle-class Caucasians, irony is the primary mode with which daily life is dealt.

White people problems.

I think it's more that Millennials are to farking lazy and stupid to come up with anything new on their own.


And they should get off your lawn!

Same shiat, different generation. When are we going to learn that similar things were said about the Silent, the Greatest, the Boomers, the Xers, and now the Mellinals. You know what I took out of that article blah, blah, blah, I don't understand young people because I'm old.
2012-11-19 12:59:21 PM  
1 votes:
It's really simple.

If you like something, OWN THE FACT THAT YOU LIKE IT.

If you don't like something, OWN THE FACT THAT YOU DON'T LIKE IT.

"Ironically" liking something you hate is a waste of energy at best, and gutless at worst (in the event that you truly do like it but don't want to appear sincere).
2012-11-19 12:42:01 PM  
1 votes:
Hipsters already live "without irony"... they dress and act EXACTLY like we expect them to...which is the opposite of what the word "irony" actually means.
2012-11-19 12:20:27 PM  
1 votes:
Christy Wampole is an assistant professor of French at Princeton University. Her research focuses primarily on 20th- and 21st-century French and Italian literature and thought.

A professor of literature and thought decrying those who devote too much of their attention to commenting on what's gone before?

Delicious.
2012-11-19 11:22:33 AM  
1 votes:
The author was 18 when Alanis Moriset released "Jagged Little" pill and is going to offer a critique on hipsters that includes this gem:

"The grunge movement was serious in its aesthetics and its attitude"

And isn't it moronic...don't ya think?
 
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