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(Salon)   "I knew Amazon was evil and is killing bookstores. Then, I got a Kindle...and suddenly, I loved Amazon"   (salon.com) divider line 220
    More: Obvious, Amazon, Kindle  
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9304 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Nov 2012 at 1:03 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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kab
2012-11-18 02:55:21 PM
Meh, I'll stick to books. Thanks.

/still buys cd's as well.
 
2012-11-18 02:57:59 PM

dmax: Kimpak: Cyrusv10: dmax: Look forward 500 years. Electricity may or may not be plentiful.

Things "written" on computers will be lost. Only things on hard copy would remain, just like we read the ancient grocery lists of our ancestors.
--

As the article pointed out, there will always be printed books. People will always buy them. ebooks won't kill that. I think that people get this notion in their minds that Kindle's and Nooks etc.. will be the end of the printed book culture and it will be forced underground a la Fahrenheit 451. Personally I think that's a little tinfoil hatty. In my opinion, I think people from now on will have a mix of physical books and ebooks. I like my kindle for when I'm away from home and don't want to risk damaging one of my physical books by lugging it around with me.

Oh, I've had three version of the Kindle. But people don't seem to understand that their computer based art, writing, photography, etc. is all temporary. Not tinfoil-hatty, but a lesson that some people will learn too late.

Already, things creating in AppleWorks, etc., are only partially retrievable. Imagine format changes in 30 years, trying to get back something that you worked on. Text might be the most safe, but one day the power will go out. (Or, alternatively, how can a society without adequate, consistent power participate in the art/literature/education?)

I've been on the net since Telnet and Mosaic, but we shouldn't confuse computers with permanence.


That's even more tinfoil hatty. Again, real books are not going to go away. So when that big EMP bomb from China goes off and everyone gets blown back to the stone ages, they'll still be there. Useful books like textbooks are always going to be in print. There will always be an endless supply of crappy steamy romance novels, etc..

As far as writing being retrievable....there is such a thing as a printer? If I was writing a book, I think I would print myself a copy. Personally speaking, there is nothing I have on any of my computers or electronic devices that I don't have some sort of physical copy of, or would care in the slightest if it were suddenly deleted.
 
2012-11-18 03:00:11 PM
This begs the question of why anyone would think less of a business which provides legal goods and services to consenting adults is morally wrong in the first place.
 
2012-11-18 03:01:08 PM
The funny thing is that Amazon paid publishers wholesale for the books they were selling for $9.99. The publishers weren't losing any money, Amazon was. The Big Four were pissed that they couldn't set the pricing throughout the book's life-cycle and that Amazon was reducing the perceived value of their product. Publishers actually make less money under the price model they have imposed but they have greater control, or so they think. They obviously learned nothing from the music industry. If you make content affordable and portable (DRM free) people will buy, you try to charge the same for digital content as physical media and lock it down (First Sale doctrine anyone?) people will pirate. Morons.
 
2012-11-18 03:02:34 PM

sfpfc: you guys are missing the point, get outside to a used bookstore, all the fun people hang around there. I got Suttree for 2 bucks as opposed to 15 or so online.


I RTFA'd. I'm pretty sure that was not the point at all.
 
2012-11-18 03:04:07 PM
I don't get all of the ebook hate. I have a couple of dozen models, going back years (i used to review ebook readers for a major trade magazine as well as my father having his name on a few e-ink patents).

I prefer mono lcd to e-ink (like the old iBook from taiwan or the jetbook mini). However, the new paperwhite is great for reading in the dark. The nook when first released was crap with the bad software. It was later updated to a point where it worked.

I am a "higher end" reader who used to haunt used book stores and send back boxes of books to my wife. She was thrilled when I went a whole week on a business trip with my old rocketbook and did not UPS any books to her.

Calibre is very good for converting between formats. You have to have a good source though.

One of the best things about ebooks is the access to older out of print books if you know where to look and ask. Complete series of magazines, etc. you can download the Gutenberg iso image and have reading to sort and go through for months. For free.
 
2012-11-18 03:04:14 PM

Kimpak: Useful books like textbooks are always going to be in print.


After the big EMP bomb goes off nothing will be in print. The modern printing industry relies heavily on computers (including the presses themselves). Nobody sets lead type by hand anymore.
 
2012-11-18 03:07:50 PM

there their theyre: I bought a kindle last year for my mother because the library has kindle books you can borrow. It's really nice. They also have epub and pdfs but I chose the kindle root because its easier to get books that way for a technologically inept person, like my mom. I read kindle books on my phone, white text on a black background is easy on my eyes.


This.

All the people who are nostalgic about the touch and feel of a book have never experienced the connivence off "checking out" an e-book from the public library.
 
2012-11-18 03:07:55 PM

alkhemy: Raharu: Publishers are again. clueless much like music labels, and Movie industry are.

Not all publishers. Many small publishers have a handle on this.

/ Owns a publishing company.

// All our ebooks are $4.99


Need a proofreader/editor? :o)

/I've always wanted to work for a publishing house
 
2012-11-18 03:08:29 PM
After the big EMP bomb goes off nothing will be in print. The modern printing industry relies heavily on computers (including the presses themselves). Nobody sets lead type by hand anymore.

*ahem* some us still do. It is a hobby. It does scare me that there are a few newspapers that still set up with an older "mainframe" dedicated to the process that I was selling and developing for in the early 80's.
 
2012-11-18 03:10:29 PM

Allen. The end.: ANy 'browse feature' in the world won't allow me to find hidden treasures, though. So far my best find has been a first edition of Dune in mint condition...for $13.


Collectable books will become worthless as collectible records as the become relics to the younger generation.
 
2012-11-18 03:14:17 PM

RyansPrivates: Girion47: TuteTibiImperes: I have a nook, but I still prefer real paper books. eBook prices are far too high, oftentimes very close to the price of a real physical book.

My preference overall is still the library. I can just log onto my county library site, request the book I want, and depending on if it has to be transported from another branch or not, walk in anytime from an hour to three days later to pick it up at the counter, all for free. It's a beautiful thing.

That's why I pirate. The only problem is getting files converted to work on my Kindle in a format I can read it. Even harder is getting the file names to be searchable on the Kindle menu. If it's part of a series I've found I'll have 3-5 files that all start the same and I can't tell the book unless I open it and back out.

I just want to find out here. Are you copying books you don't have in another form? Or you just going out and getting what you want without compensation for the content owner?

If you have a book, but not in any epub format, I am ok with it. That is fair use in my book. Same for stripping DRM from it so you can copy it to multiple readers you own. Fark the DMCA. Shifting the content you have purchased from one medium to another so that you can use shouldn't be illiegal.

Now where I have a problem is when people want something for free that they haven't otherwise paid for. (which is why I have problem with toll roads: use the farking tax money you have already taken, if it isn't enough raise taxes. Roads are public infrastrucure, but I digress) When someone (or someone's dog) wants steak, should they just walk down to the grocery store and take what they want without paying for it? How about gas? Or a car? What about walking into a book store and walking out with the physical copies?


It really doesn't matter. Some of it is I'm getting books that I'm intrigued by but don't want to buy, can do the same through my library, the other is I'm getting electronic versions of books I own.

Pirating a book isn't a big deal to me. I can check it out from the library or get it used at a book sale, and the author gets nothing in return.
 
2012-11-18 03:14:45 PM
Funny thing, it's almost impossible to tell whether this is a real Salon writer or someone parodying Salon writers.
 
2012-11-18 03:15:10 PM

exvaxman: After the big EMP bomb goes off nothing will be in print. The modern printing industry relies heavily on computers (including the presses themselves). Nobody sets lead type by hand anymore.

*ahem* some us still do. It is a hobby. It does scare me that there are a few newspapers that still set up with an older "mainframe" dedicated to the process that I was selling and developing for in the early 80's.


You'll be busy after the big Chinese EMP bomb goes off. I hope you have a steam plant to run your platen presses...
 
2012-11-18 03:15:23 PM
I hate turning off my kindle on the airplane takeoff and land. This is when books are best
us.123rf.com
 
2012-11-18 03:16:16 PM

MikeMc: Kimpak: Useful books like textbooks are always going to be in print.

After the big EMP bomb goes off nothing will be in print. The modern printing industry relies heavily on computers (including the presses themselves). Nobody sets lead type by hand anymore.


lol, touche. However, I meant that up to the point of the EMP books will continue to be printed. After the EMP, well printing books is but one of the many problems society would face.

Somewhat off topic but I think there's enough people out there with skills in how do to things without electricity, that society will survive after an initial shiatty period of time. A different world to be sure, but I feel like eventually power will be restored and people will start over. We're not going to just forget how to generate electricity, but it may take a generation or three to get it back.
 
2012-11-18 03:22:27 PM

MikeMc: exvaxman: After the big EMP bomb goes off nothing will be in print. The modern printing industry relies heavily on computers (including the presses themselves). Nobody sets lead type by hand anymore.

*ahem* some us still do. It is a hobby. It does scare me that there are a few newspapers that still set up with an older "mainframe" dedicated to the process that I was selling and developing for in the early 80's.

You'll be busy after the big Chinese EMP bomb goes off. I hope you have a steam plant to run your platen presses...


A couple of years ago, I looked at a house being sold by the third generation of the original owners. It had a small printing press in the basement with tons of accessories (I don't know the names for them, but there were several boxes of stuff along with it and parts strewn around the basement room). I believe it was non-electric.

If the house hadn't been too big and too expensive (along with a shiatty location on a main road), that actually would have been a selling point for me, because it was pretty cool. The house was boiler heated, too.
 
2012-11-18 03:24:25 PM
I've had a Kindle for a few years. It is easy onnthe eyes and good formatting but I find it much easier to go back and find a passage in a book in print. Plus, I like having my books on my bookshelves. Sometimes I'll stare at them and it will remind me to look up other books by a particular author. Sometimes it will prompt me to re-read one. I guess I am just old fashioned. Still, I use the Kindle sometimes but the prices for ebooks seriously piss me off.
 
2012-11-18 03:25:10 PM

ladyfortuna: MikeMc: exvaxman: After the big EMP bomb goes off nothing will be in print. The modern printing industry relies heavily on computers (including the presses themselves). Nobody sets lead type by hand anymore.

*ahem* some us still do. It is a hobby. It does scare me that there are a few newspapers that still set up with an older "mainframe" dedicated to the process that I was selling and developing for in the early 80's.

You'll be busy after the big Chinese EMP bomb goes off. I hope you have a steam plant to run your platen presses...

A couple of years ago, I looked at a house being sold by the third generation of the original owners. It had a small printing press in the basement with tons of accessories (I don't know the names for them, but there were several boxes of stuff along with it and parts strewn around the basement room). I believe it was non-electric.

If the house hadn't been too big and too expensive (along with a shiatty location on a main road), that actually would have been a selling point for me, because it was pretty cool. The house was boiler heated, too.


That would be cool (I've been involved in the printing business in one form or another for ~30 years).
 
2012-11-18 03:25:26 PM

Kimpak: Somewhat off topic but I think there's enough people out there with skills in how do to things without electricity, that society will survive after an initial shiatty period of time. A different world to be sure, but I feel like eventually power will be restored and people will start over. We're not going to just forget how to generate electricity, but it may take a generation or three to get it back.



That, and there's like 10,000 electricity companies out there with engineers and technicians and workers. Those companies and their evil profit-mongering are going to work extra hard to rebuild their villainous money-making electrical grid as soon as possible.
 
2012-11-18 03:26:55 PM

museamused: I've had a Kindle for a few years. It is easy onnthe eyes and good formatting but I find it much easier to go back and find a passage in a book in print.


The fact that Kindle books use "locations" instead of page numbers sucks. It makes it very hard to move back and forth if you don't bookmark everything.
 
2012-11-18 03:29:00 PM

MikeMc: museamused: I've had a Kindle for a few years. It is easy onnthe eyes and good formatting but I find it much easier to go back and find a passage in a book in print.

The fact that Kindle books use "locations" instead of page numbers sucks. It makes it very hard to move back and forth if you don't bookmark everything.


Maybe I'm reading books wrong, but I've never had to flip back and forth while reading a book except in the case of choose your own adventure novels.
 
2012-11-18 03:33:32 PM

RandomAxe: All_Farked_Up: Amazon is actually one of the better ones as individuals can sell their own books without a publishing contract.

Yes, but this is ridiculous on its face. You ought to be able to buy content directly from the individuals, online, or through any licensed third-party merchant. Piracy is obviously an issue, but proprietary formats that consumers are slaved to are bullshiat. Kindle owners, for instance, generally don't realize how they've tied their genitals to Amazon until Amazon decides to drive off in a huff.


I own a Kindle. I don't have a damn thing on it tied to an Amazon account. Even if I DO buy something from Amazon rather than any of the other e-retailers I could choose from, it's trivial to modify the file once I've downloaded it so they can't remove it remotely.

This sounds a lot like people claiming that iPods were "proprietary", not realising they played literally any .mp3 file you put on them, and you weren't in any way obliged to use iTunes. I also have an iPod nano, and have never bought a damn thing off iTunes, either.

Their shops are proprietary. Their hardware is NOT. And nothing, nothing forces you to use their shops.


dmax: Oh, I've had three version of the Kindle. But people don't seem to understand that their computer based art, writing, photography, etc. is all temporary. Not tinfoil-hatty, but a lesson that some people will learn too late.

Already, things creating in AppleWorks, etc., are only partially retrievable. Imagine format changes in 30 years, trying to get back something that you worked on. Text might be the most safe, but one day the power will go out. (Or, alternatively, how can a society without adequate, consistent power participate in the art/literature/education?)

I've been on the net since Telnet and Mosaic, but we shouldn't confuse computers with permanence.


Books are anything but permanent, either. Fires, water damage, loss of the physical item in some way, etc. Format changes aren't really much of an issue; if there's a demand, it will be relatively trivial to create a conversion system. They already do this, entirely open-source for the most part, with software emulation of video games; you can emulate plenty of games for which the physical technology is dwindling. The ROM files are often not LEGAL, for copyright reasons, but that's a different issue; format changes, particularly backwards for something as simple as text files, is relatively simple.

And the power will never "go out". You might lose power in certain areas, or the generators might go down, but private generation will always be available. The only circumstance where it would not would be if we were facing such apocalyptic events that society has utterly collapsed. The kind of events that would ALSO see physical books being burned as tinder just to keep warm. If it ever were to occur, physical books are in no way better suited to survive.

As for more technological issues like EMP weapons or the like, we're on the cusp of a technological revolution with the rise of cloud computing. I don't want to call it "the cloud" as if it were some single thing, but the idea is distributed wireless backups. Once we incorporate it with satellite technology serving as additional clusters (we have the tech for this, it's just not fully established due to cost and such), then the US could get nuked into radioactive glass, and all (or at least, most) of our data would survive.

On a personal level, our data is FAR more protected now than it ever has been. I can back up my entire e-book library to multiple devices (it's on my PC as well as the Kindle, right now). My own work, I frequently back up to Google. If my entire house were to burn down, all my physical books would be toast. I'd still have a lot of my electronic data available. The issue about future compatibility doesn't really apply, since we're not talking about lost archives suddenly rediscovered; you'll be updating your data as technology changes. And really, recovering data in an older format isn't any more difficult than recovering data in a forgotten language. Easier, more likely, since we have better records and such.


Yes, if we went through a new collapse of society like the one after the fall of the Holy Roman Empire, a lot of our literature and such would vanish. It did then, too. We're still missing famous books of that era that we know of through references, but of which no copies are known to survive. You're overestimating the resilience of books as a medium, and underestimating the strength of electronics.
 
2012-11-18 03:35:04 PM
Maybe I'm reading books wrong, but I've never had to flip back and forth while reading a book except in the case of choose your own adventure novels.

And, again, using proper hypertext formatting not only completely eliminates this issue but is superior, in this respect, to print.
 
2012-11-18 03:35:27 PM

dmax: One piece of unabashed genius that will never make the transition to eBook.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x440]


So help me, I can't stand that book.
 
2012-11-18 03:39:37 PM

BullBearMS: RexTalionis: The fact that I no longer have to waste time flipping pages with my Kindle has meant that my reading speed is dramatically quicker.

If you really want to increase your reading speed, give this a try.

It's pretty amazing.


As far as I can see, that is SLOWER than normal reading.

I don't see the point.
 
2012-11-18 03:45:44 PM

RandomAxe: I never liked Steve Jobs, but if he were still alive very few people would be buying a Nook or Kindle. Or paying as much as $5 for a typical ebook. I'm just saying.


Huh? The Kindle and the Nook were both released, and sold like gangbusters (with $10 ebooks), well before Jobs's death. Why do you think any of that would have drastically changed in the last year?
 
2012-11-18 03:53:27 PM

RandomAxe: For that matter, I should add that far superior e-ink technology has existed for well over a decade now. Commercially available readers are really crappy. Never mind that they ought to be full computers; their displays should be capable of very nice full-motion video, and at about the same price point.


What are you basing this on? Are you saying there was 60Hz e-ink technology available 10 years ago, which cost no more than what Amazon is using for the Kindle, and for some reason Amazon just didn't use it? If this tech is available at the same price point, why hasn't any company adopted it to blow the existing competition out of the water?
 
2012-11-18 03:53:37 PM

patternmatch: RandomAxe: I never liked Steve Jobs, but if he were still alive very few people would be buying a Nook or Kindle. Or paying as much as $5 for a typical ebook. I'm just saying.

Huh? The Kindle and the Nook were both released, and sold like gangbusters (with $10 ebooks), well before Jobs's death. Why do you think any of that would have drastically changed in the last year?


So many tech pundits were crowing about about how the iPad was going to revolutionize electronic publishing. Yeah, no. All Apple did was help raise prices.
 
2012-11-18 03:57:01 PM

DoctorCal: Kimpak: DoctorCal: FirstNationalBastard: See, I can't throw support behind a device that will allow someone to delete books I paid for on a whim.

No one will be deleting my paperback copy of a novel because some bullshiat terms of service changed or a licensing agreement ran out.

Or because you stopped paying a subscription fee

Or, you could...you know back up the file from your kindle. If amazon pulls the licence you just load the thing back on from your back up and turn wireless off till you finish it.

Oh. So....steal it? I don't need a kindle to do that.


If you've already paid for it, and are taking steps to prevent it being taken away from you, how is that "stealing" it?
 
2012-11-18 04:00:08 PM
Best thing about a kindle is project Gutenberg and a relatively long bus commute. A few years of the two and I'll have read most of the canon. I was shocked at how handy that little thing is.
 
2012-11-18 04:05:24 PM
amazon sells books? i thought all they sold we're like everything else
 
2012-11-18 04:12:35 PM

skinink: I recently bought "The Picture of Dorian Gray" from Google Play. In the book his name is continuously misspelled as Dorian Cray, among other mistakes in the text. Google would not refund my money.


I had downloaded a bunch of books from the pirate bay, and had similar quality issues. Figuring it was pirates providing a crappy copy, I went and purchased a few of the books that I really wanted from Barnes & Noble. Their copies had the same mistakes. Lesson learned. B&N charges a premium for the books, and has very little quality control in place, so I'll keep torrenting them for now.

/Would make sweet, sweet love to my Glowlight Nook if I could
 
2012-11-18 04:14:14 PM

StashMonster: BullBearMS: RexTalionis: The fact that I no longer have to waste time flipping pages with my Kindle has meant that my reading speed is dramatically quicker.

If you really want to increase your reading speed, give this a try.

It's pretty amazing.

As far as I can see, that is SLOWER than normal reading.

I don't see the point.


Did you see the part where you can change the speed, type size, number of words displayed simultaneously, etc?
 
2012-11-18 04:19:37 PM

louiedog: Tourney3p0: louiedog:

Oh, I get it. Your joke is about people not reading when you clearly didn't read my comment. Very meta of you. I love it.

I read it. You think that having someone "read you a story" is the same as reading. It's not. Entirely different parts of the brain get stimulated.

If your goal is just to be entertained, great. No problem there. But in the end, you're still proud of not reading. Sad.

You cracked it. My comment about listening to cassettes on a walkman oozed so much pride over not reading that it completely covered the ridiculous of the statement.


I cannot f*cking believe you're getting so many bites. Congratulations. All hail the king of the trolls.

Do you have the headphones embedded in your helmet?

i.imgur.com
 
2012-11-18 04:28:34 PM
Their shops are proprietary. Their hardware is NOT. And nothing, nothing forces you to use their shops.

In my old job, almost everyone used a smartphone or a tablet to read at work. I was the only one who didn't, got made fun of all the time and my boss asked me one day why I didn't get with the crowd and do what they were doing. If i liked it there.

I didn't.

I got myself laid off a year later.
 
2012-11-18 05:00:04 PM
I decided to get a Nook [simple touch with glowlight] a while back because my bookshelf was full, and I figured digital is especially good for stuff like classics that I don't really need sitting on my shelf forever after I read them. And it really is great for traveling.

I really dislike everything about the Nook store. For one thing, I have books I bought from Borders still on my shelf even though Borders is gone. I wish Barnes and Noble the best, but should they go out of business I want to be sure I still have everything I bought. I could flex on that some (as I do with Steam) if the books were cheap, but not when they're just as expensive as physical copies. Also, I dislike from a philosophical standpoint the idea that they'd be keeping a list of all the books I buy.

So everything I have on my Nook is from Project Gutenberg and it's pretty great.
 
2012-11-18 05:03:00 PM

patternmatch: DoctorCal: Kimpak: DoctorCal: FirstNationalBastard: See, I can't throw support behind a device that will allow someone to delete books I paid for on a whim.

No one will be deleting my paperback copy of a novel because some bullshiat terms of service changed or a licensing agreement ran out.

Or because you stopped paying a subscription fee

Or, you could...you know back up the file from your kindle. If amazon pulls the licence you just load the thing back on from your back up and turn wireless off till you finish it.

Oh. So....steal it? I don't need a kindle to do that.

If you've already paid for it, and are taking steps to prevent it being taken away from you, how is that "stealing" it?


What is this "it" that you thing has been paid for? If you think it's ownership of a digital copy of a book, you're entirely mistaken.
 
2012-11-18 05:03:58 PM

GoldenEagle: I decided to get a Nook [simple touch with glowlight] a while back because my bookshelf was full, and I figured digital is especially good for stuff like classics that I don't really need sitting on my shelf forever after I read them. And it really is great for traveling.

I really dislike everything about the Nook store. For one thing, I have books I bought from Borders still on my shelf even though Borders is gone. I wish Barnes and Noble the best, but should they go out of business I want to be sure I still have everything I bought. I could flex on that some (as I do with Steam) if the books were cheap, but not when they're just as expensive as physical copies. Also, I dislike from a philosophical standpoint the idea that they'd be keeping a list of all the books I buy.

So everything I have on my Nook is from Project Gutenberg and it's pretty great.


Kindle here. I buy everything I read, but I crack the DRM and store it myself. Partially it's a hedge against Amazon going out of business. But mostly it's because I spend a lot on books, and I want my ebook collection to be part of my estate when I kick the bucket - I have no guarantee of that anywhere.
 
2012-11-18 05:06:53 PM
www.the-ebook-reader.com

I love my Sony reader. What I especially like about these things is that I can take them on vacation - like when I did for almost a month in Latin America last year and read five novels. I didn't have to lug those books in my small backpack; they were all on my reader.
 
2012-11-18 05:17:46 PM
Another advantage of the Kindle 2 is that I can rely on the battery lasting for 2+ weeks if I keep the wifi/3G turned off. I don't see a tablet lasting that long on one charge.
 
2012-11-18 05:21:36 PM
Having a need for many reference books on electronic format...I have found the best is CHM. Much better than pdf's....


Do not trust the "cloud"

If it is not in your hand you do not have it.
 
2012-11-18 05:27:45 PM
I have been re-reading Terry Practchett's Discworld series.

I had most, but not all of them, in hardcover or paperback. I started reading them by borrowing them from the library and decided it was worth owning my own cleaner, permanent copies.

I filled the gaps in my collection with paperbacks when I started to re-read them and also bought the Kindle versions because they were mostly quite cheap--under $6 or $8 for almost all.

So I have been re-reading Pratchet on both Kindle and paper.

It's been great. I can get through them faster without carrying an ackward book. I can make some time and sit down and read a physical book with a greater appreciation of how great that is, both in terms of comfort and psychological well-being. A nice hard cover, even a nice paperback book is a pleasure to hold. The paper, with a good light, is a pleasure to see and read words.

But some of the books on offer now are more expensive. In fact, some of the Kindle versions are more expensive than hard covers or paper backs alike.

I won't see a penny back from the settlement between Amazon and publishers (because it only applies in America, although the books were purchased by me in Canada from an American website which charged me in American dollars from books published in America by American publishers, yada, yada, yada). But I think that this can work if you use your common sense and buy some books in hard cover, some in paper back, and some in purely electronic form.

In my experence, cartoons benefit immensely from being published on paper. The paper matters to cartoonists, some of whom are artists despite the constant grind of technical and economic constraints.

It should matter to the readers.

On the other hand, I have reached the point in my book lover life where books are a physical threat to my safety and happiness unless I have the nerve and judgment to discard a book for a book purchased. I really could and should stop buying books, magazines, CDs, DVDs, and even electronic formats and just use what I have. There is enough here for several lifetimes of entertainment, education and aesthetic experience.

Pratchett has recently published a handful of short stories he did and most of which are available for free online. Most, but probably not all. Should I pay $17.57 for the Kindle book, over $20.00 for the hard cover, and if so, to whom should I pay it?

The Kindle book and the hardcover are about what the hardcovers alone used to cost, but this book is slimmer and I have already read most if not all of it. Yet I want my collection to be complete, and my reading experence to be flexible and portable. I really think I want both the book and the Kindle book, now, now, now. But I know I could easily do without one or the other or possibly both. Buyer's remorse is a risk (not for the book, for the money spent).

I just don't know how much I should be paying, and for what, although I agree that e-books and real books are both great and that they can work well together if the legal flim-flam is handled right. I want them forever, or in realistic terms, until I die and pass some of them on to future generations of readers, some of whom will hopefully be among my heirs and assigns.

If only I had a few hundred feet more space on my shelves. I can't even get decent shelves for what I have. If I knew a carpenter, I might commission some book shelves to my specs that would make this apartment liveable again, but I fear that the book industry isn't the only one which has been nearly wiped out by technology and shlock tactics by corporations, seconded by consumers not willing to pay for the best experience.
 
2012-11-18 05:28:10 PM
The thing I love most about my Kindles and Kindle apps is that no matter which one I use, it's almost instantly at the right place in whatever book I'm reading at the time. Words cannot express how awesome it is to be able to pull out my phone when I'm stuck waiting somewhere and start reading the same book (in the same place) I was reading the night before in bed on the e-ink or tablet.
 
2012-11-18 05:36:43 PM
And it doesn't matter when Amazon randomly deletes all your ebooks remotely without reimbursement. After all, the basis of our economy is that any seller always has the right to take their product back at any point after the sale has been made.
 
2012-11-18 05:41:32 PM
Sorry, I refuse to pay for a product where the company can, whenever they see fit, just turn off my account and render all the "books" that I've paid for unreadable.

Couple that with the fact that E-Books are non-transferable (meaning you can't trade them in at a used bookstore) and/or buy/sell them on eBay, and I will stick with the physical books - for as long as they're being printed, anyway.

I hardly ever buy books "New" anyway; occassionally I will, but usually I just make a trip to a used bookstore about once a month and pick up a grocery sack full at well under 1/3rd the cost of cover price.
 
2012-11-18 05:43:22 PM

RandomAxe: Disclosure: I manage a used book store that's perpetually on the verge of going out of business.


My sympathies. Bet it's one of the good ones. I used to live near those a few different times in my life, back when Borders and B&N were still ascendant. Occasionally I visit somewhere that has a really good bookstore and get to enjoy it for a bit. There is still one indie store here, actually a tiny chain of 3, but I've stopped going. I just couldn't take their flavor of douchebaggery anymore. I've had people actually sneer or roll their eyes at my selection when checking me out at the register. Last time I was in one an employee got right in front of me where I was browsing and started restocking, without saying excuse me or anything. Their selection was never anything special anyway, and half the store is kids toys and gift shop crap.

I don't go to B&N either except to browse magazines which I never buy.
 
2012-11-18 05:49:56 PM

DamnYankees: I honestly prefer the Kindle App on my iPad to my actual Kindle.


I hate that Apple nuked all in-app purchases by e-book apps other than Itunes. I think it might have been in response to a patent suit claiming the in-app purchasing process.
 
2012-11-18 05:59:07 PM

amquelbettamin: I hate turning off my kindle on the airplane takeoff and land. This is when books are best


Pretty much every flight I've been on for the past couple of years, I've seen multiple people simply turn off the screens on their Ipads and phones and put them away. They're still on.

The FAA really needs to establish what really is and isn't important. When you imply that lives are on the line when they obviously aren't, people stop listening to other things you say too.
 
2012-11-18 06:06:18 PM

Southern100: Sorry, I refuse to pay for a product where the company can, whenever they see fit, just turn off my account and render all the "books" that I've paid for unreadable.


And yet, Amazon isn't the only source for Kindle-compatible e-books.

I don't like that they can turn off my account, so I don't have an account. That doesn't mean I don't have a bunch of ebooks on my Kindle.

Couple that with the fact that E-Books are non-transferable (meaning you can't trade them in at a used bookstore) and/or buy/sell them on eBay, and I will stick with the physical books - for as long as they're being printed, anyway.

I still buy physical books, but if I want to test a new series, getting the e-book from the library is now my new favorite method. And if I own a physical copy, I'll go find an e-book version, if I want it. Not to mention, there's a ton of stuff, particularly classics that are out of copyright, that are 100% free in e-book form, which is amazing for someone who's a fan of classic literature.

I don't use the Kindle as a replacement for my book collection. I use it as a supplement. It's also crazy portable, since fitting that thin slab in my briefcase is a lot easier than fitting the 3-4 books I'd want to be carrying for a trip that lasted more than a week or so.

The main reason I'd ever want to sell a book anyway is to clear out shelf space. With a e-books, that's a complete non-factor, since file sizes are so ridiculously tiny that storage is practically free.
 
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