If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Onion AV Club)   An interview with Britain's most celebrated living author, the wonderful Terry Pratchett, who is responsible for the Discworld series and arguably the greatest book about the apocalypse, Good Omens   (avclub.com) divider line 78
    More: Cool, Terry Pratchett, Good Omens, Discworld, Britain, picture books, Oliver Twist, laser tag, Mr. Spock  
•       •       •

2105 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 17 Nov 2012 at 8:46 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



78 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-11-17 06:34:07 PM
Normally I hate that site, subby, but this was a good read. Thanks.
Some NSFW words, but its Terry, so...what would anyone expect ?
 
2012-11-17 06:41:51 PM
Is it bad that I've got that book almost entirely memorized, including (or, rather, especially) the footnotes?


\Shadwell hated Southerners, and was, by inference, on the North Pole.
\\"And the Lord did not ask again."
\\\"So they would be quite large terrorists."
 
2012-11-17 06:43:29 PM
Awesome. I just started "Good Omens" and am only about a chapter in. Sounds like I have a helluva read in front of me.
 
2012-11-17 06:49:44 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: Awesome. I just started "Good Omens" and am only about a chapter in. Sounds like I have a helluva read in front of me.


You do. Good Omens is one of those books you keep coming back to and discover something new. Every Easter, I read Good Omens and Lamb.

kmmontandon: Is it bad that I've got that book almost entirely memorized, including (or, rather, especially) the footnotes?


Demons like Ligur and Hastur wouldn't understand. They'd never have thought up Welsh language television, for example. Or value-added tax. Or Manchester. He'd been particularly pleased with Manchester.
 
2012-11-17 08:18:25 PM
Crivens!
 
2012-11-17 08:35:32 PM
Good Omens is one of my favorite reads.
 
2012-11-17 08:53:19 PM
I love Terry Pratchett! Amazing author, and awesome books. 'Good Omens' is one of my favourites.
 
2012-11-17 08:55:01 PM
The road to hell isn't paved with good intentions; it's paved with frozen door-to-door salesmen.
 
2012-11-17 08:57:09 PM
Good article, looking forward to some of his books now.
 
2012-11-17 09:00:22 PM
Good Omens is a pretty good book, but it's been overhyped by nerds worse than Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I wouldn't even say it's the best book I've read about an apocalypse. It wouldn't even crack my top 10.

/Sacred cows make the best hamburger
 
2012-11-17 09:06:36 PM
I was really put off of his work after he abandoned mocking the fantasy genre to churn out fantacrap but I was really surprised at the ability he showed in the Tiffany Aching series. Then again, I read about drow elves and I vote.
 
2012-11-17 09:08:11 PM

SockMonkeyHolocaust: I was really put off of his work after he abandoned mocking the fantasy genre to churn out fantacrap but I was really surprised at the ability he showed in the Tiffany Aching series. Then again, I read about drow elves and I vote.


He didn't do "fantacrap." He's been writing serious satirical literature for a while now. Nightwatch is a phenomenal piece of political satire.
 
2012-11-17 09:13:21 PM
I really like Terry's Discworld books, but I was kind of 'meh' on Good Omens. I thought it was pretty good, but I don't have any real urge to read it again.
 
2012-11-17 09:15:38 PM
All y'all who say you don't like Terry Pratchett are WRONG.
 
2012-11-17 09:17:22 PM
If you say so but the character of Sam Vimes is incredibly one-dimensional in the books he stars in and hey, time traveling story line where he has to fix the past to return to the future while the author re-uses a large majority of the same jokes he's reused in a number of other books.

You can make the case, and Sherwood Schwartz did, that Gilligan's Island was a microcosm of the UN but it didn't make it good. I'll admit that Night Watch was less of a mess than Pratchett's usual books are, but that has been the exception.
 
2012-11-17 09:35:53 PM
I thought the Harry Potter chick was the most celebrated British author currently alive. How do we determine this celebration factor? Millions/book or Likes on facebook?
 
2012-11-17 09:36:32 PM

SockMonkeyHolocaust: Sam Vimes is incredibly one-dimensional in the books he stars in


I have to disagree. I wont spoil it for folks who have not read any of the books, but he does go from a bit player to multifaceted major character in short order. Now true, hes a cop, but he becomes so much more....
/thats my 2 sausages in a bun from Dibbler
 
2012-11-17 09:38:46 PM

Rincewind53: All y'all who say you don't like Terry Pratchett are WRONG.


This is correct. And it wouldn't be a Pratchett thread without Rincewind.
 
2012-11-17 09:45:33 PM
I got through about 30 pages of Good Omens before I started hating it. I think it's only the second book (out of hundreds if not thousands) that I've ever started and not finished.

What bothered me most were the incessant "x, y, funny" examples and elaborations that I didn't see the humor in.

Why do people love it?
 
2012-11-17 09:46:12 PM

BumpInTheNight: I thought the Harry Potter chick was the most celebrated British author currently alive. How do we determine this celebration factor? Millions/book or Likes on facebook?


Nah, she's the best-selling British author.

But Terry is deeply likable and deeply loved in the UK.
 
2012-11-17 09:50:43 PM
F*cking fantasy nerds. Can't even get their own sh*t togehter. JK Rowlings is by far the UK's most celebrated living author. With or without the lame mass-market "fantasy" qualifier. Whatever. Half of you haven't read Lucky Jim.
 
2012-11-17 09:51:41 PM

bobbette: Good Omens is a pretty good book, but it's been overhyped by nerds worse than Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I wouldn't even say it's the best book I've read about an apocalypse. It wouldn't even crack my top 10.

/Sacred cows make the best hamburger


2/10. If you really wanted to troll, you could point out how unlikely it is that he'll finish another book.

/Article doesn't mention he's already willed Discworld to his daughter to continue when he can't write it anymore.
 
2012-11-17 10:05:27 PM
No love for Neil? He did help, after all.
 
2012-11-17 10:07:57 PM

fusillade762: No love for Neil? He did help, after all.


I'll bring all the love for him if he bothers to do the sequel to American Gods.
 
2012-11-17 10:10:15 PM

alienated: fusillade762: No love for Neil? He did help, after all.

I'll bring all the love for him if he bothers to do the sequel to American Gods.


Did you not read Anansi Boys or the short story he released in Fragile Things that followed American Gods?
 
2012-11-17 10:21:27 PM
I'm ashamed to admit this, but I'm trying to slog through "Color of Magic," and I just don't think it's very good. It's not clever or amusing or entertaining. I don't see what the attraction is. Is there a better Discworld book I should be reading?
 
2012-11-17 10:26:47 PM

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I'm ashamed to admit this, but I'm trying to slog through "Color of Magic," and I just don't think it's very good. It's not clever or amusing or entertaining. I don't see what the attraction is. Is there a better Discworld book I should be reading?


Yes, nearly all of them. Color of Magic and Light fantastic are not the best to start on really. Try Weird Sisters or Guards Guards. Of course I'm biased as they are my two favorites.
 
2012-11-17 10:33:30 PM

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I'm ashamed to admit this, but I'm trying to slog through "Color of Magic," and I just don't think it's very good. It's not clever or amusing or entertaining. I don't see what the attraction is. Is there a better Discworld book I should be reading?


If you are trying to get into Discworld, read Guards Guards! It's the start of the Nightwatch sub-series and in my opinion the best of the books to start the different sub-series. The other early books are not as good. Guards Guards! is where Terry Pratchett starts to hit his stride.
 
2012-11-17 10:34:34 PM
Good Omens was frippin' brilliant. Though in fairness, part of that was also in Neil Gaiman's hands.
 
2012-11-17 10:38:58 PM
I loved American Gods and sort of tolerated Anansi Boys, but most of the descriptions I've seen of Terry Pratchett's books make them look overly focused on the fantasy. I might have to pick up a copy of Good Omens, if all the reviews were misstating things.
 
2012-11-17 10:40:37 PM
Unseen Academicals was crap
 
2012-11-17 10:45:14 PM
I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that Britain's most celebrated living author is JK Rowling.
 
2012-11-17 10:47:56 PM
Mr. Pratchett's is like PG Wodehouse, Patrick O'Brian and other hyper-productive geniuses: he's got some great stuff and he's got some crap. *Cough*Monstrous Regiment*Cough*.

But that interview -- God Almighty, that interviewer makes Jay Leno look deft and empathetic.
 
2012-11-17 10:49:28 PM

bobbette: Good Omens is a pretty good book, but it's been overhyped by nerds worse than Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I wouldn't even say it's the best book I've read about an apocalypse. It wouldn't even crack my top 10.

/Sacred cows make the best hamburger


What books about the apocalypse would you recommend? It's looking to be a long cold winter, and I need some reading material.
 
2012-11-17 10:51:20 PM

HighZoolander: I got through about 30 pages of Good Omens before I started hating it. I think it's only the second book (out of hundreds if not thousands) that I've ever started and not finished.

What bothered me most were the incessant "x, y, funny" examples and elaborations that I didn't see the humor in.

Why do people love it?


You read a satirical novel and didn't get that it was satire? I think it isn't so much something is wrong with the book, as something is wrong with you.
 
2012-11-17 10:54:44 PM

deaccessioned: bobbette: Good Omens is a pretty good book, but it's been overhyped by nerds worse than Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I wouldn't even say it's the best book I've read about an apocalypse. It wouldn't even crack my top 10.

/Sacred cows make the best hamburger

What books about the apocalypse would you recommend? It's looking to be a long cold winter, and I need some reading material.


I'd start with Decision Points.
/sarcasm

Seriously, I'm going to miss him when he goes - I'm a huge fan of Pratchett.

greentea1985: Prank Call of Cthulhu: I'm ashamed to admit this, but I'm trying to slog through "Color of Magic," and I just don't think it's very good. It's not clever or amusing or entertaining. I don't see what the attraction is. Is there a better Discworld book I should be reading?

If you are trying to get into Discworld, read Guards Guards! It's the start of the Nightwatch sub-series and in my opinion the best of the books to start the different sub-series. The other early books are not as good. Guards Guards! is where Terry Pratchett starts to hit his stride.


Can't emphasize that choice enough - you'll enjoy the earlier books more once you read the later books, starting with Guards Guards!
 
2012-11-17 10:56:21 PM

Whoatherebabie: Yes, nearly all of them. Color of Magic and Light fantastic are not the best to start on really.


Unless, like me, you like to see how the world evolves...

(starred with Lords and Ladies)
 
2012-11-17 11:14:57 PM

baka-san: Whoatherebabie: Yes, nearly all of them. Color of Magic and Light fantastic are not the best to start on really.

Unless, like me, you like to see how the world evolves...

(starred with Lords and Ladies)


I've read the whole series in the order they were published and loved them all, so I did start with Color of Magic & Light Fantastic. For some reason many people do get stuck trying to start with those.

Love me some Granny & Vimes, I can't even remember how may times I've read those books.
 
2012-11-17 11:22:44 PM
I am so relieved his Alzheimers is not progressing at the rate they expected. A world without Pterry seems like a bleak prospect.
Love Good Omens, one of the few books I could actually tolerate listening to in the car as well. Normally I can't stand audio books,but GO just can't go wrong with me.
 
2012-11-17 11:29:35 PM

HotWingAgenda: I loved American Gods and sort of tolerated Anansi Boys, but most of the descriptions I've seen of Terry Pratchett's books make them look overly focused on the fantasy. I might have to pick up a copy of Good Omens, if all the reviews were misstating things.


Diskworld books are satire and societal commentary dressed up as fantasy. Don't worry about the fantasy label -- it's just the setting, and it makes everything work.
 
2012-11-17 11:35:56 PM

deaccessioned: bobbette: Good Omens is a pretty good book, but it's been overhyped by nerds worse than Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I wouldn't even say it's the best book I've read about an apocalypse. It wouldn't even crack my top 10.

/Sacred cows make the best hamburger

What books about the apocalypse would you recommend? It's looking to be a long cold winter, and I need some reading material.


To start off with... Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and Oryx & Crake, World War Z by Max Brooks, Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut, and Girlfriend in a Coma by Douglas Coupland. I think you'd also probably like Y: The Last Man.
 
2012-11-17 11:52:23 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: Awesome. I just started "Good Omens" and am only about a chapter in. Sounds like I have a helluva read in front of me.


It's not Terry's best book. But it's certainly Gaiman's.
 
2012-11-18 12:00:22 AM
I'm pretty much a diehard Anglophile, but other than Good Omens I haven't been able to get into Pratchett's other stuff. It's just so.... goofy. Like every line has to be a joke or a pun. It felt like the literary equivalent of an Adam Sandler movie.

Though before I get flamed I'm going to try again. Probably "Guards, Guards" since everyone is recommending it.


bobbette: deaccessioned: bobbette: Good Omens is a pretty good book, but it's been overhyped by nerds worse than Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I wouldn't even say it's the best book I've read about an apocalypse. It wouldn't even crack my top 10.

/Sacred cows make the best hamburger

What books about the apocalypse would you recommend? It's looking to be a long cold winter, and I need some reading material.

To start off with... Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and Oryx & Crake, World War Z by Max Brooks, Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut, and Girlfriend in a Coma by Douglas Coupland. I think you'd also probably like Y: The Last Man.


Seconded on Y: The Last Man. Though I can't say I was happy with the way it ended.

Lucifer's Hammer is an old favorite. And this one was... interesting. 

d.gr-assets.com
 
2012-11-18 01:05:19 AM

bobbette: To start off with... Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale.


The scary thing is there are a lot of people in America today who would probably be happy if this became a reality. (I'm not one of them).

----

As for Prachett, I've not been too keen on his latest books. Something feels off about them. But then again, I never liked some of the earlier ones (Pyramids, Equal Rites) either.

And the more I read Monstrous Regiment the more it grows on me.
 
2012-11-18 01:47:51 AM
An ex got me into Pratchett, lent me "Guards! Guards!", and I loved it. It's like Monty Python's Flying Circus type british humour in a detective story set in some fantasy place. 3 Great tastes in one.
 
2012-11-18 02:05:12 AM
So who would be a good actor to play Vimes? William Hurt? Liam Neeson?
 
2012-11-18 02:05:52 AM
My first Pratchett book was Guards!, Guards!.

It sat in a drawer for about two years before I read it. And then, my mind was blown.

However, I'm not really seeing any mention of the fnord Bromliad, or Johnny and the Bomb/Only You Can Save Mankind, fnord or Nation.

If I could point to five books that fnord pointed out my own fnord philosophy to me, four of fnord them would be Terry Pratchett books fnord (Nation, Hogfather, Small Gods, Reaper Man)

/fnord
//You should be able to figure out the fnord fifth.
 
2012-11-18 02:17:25 AM
I was pretty drunk by the time I got halfway through Good Omens, so I'm probably a bad judge of whether it's actually good or not. Incidentally, doing a border crossing from one communist country to another while drunk was probably not one of my finest hours.
 
2012-11-18 02:30:04 AM

Soymilk: So who would be a good actor to play Vimes? William Hurt? Liam Neeson?


Terry himself always wanted the late Pete Postlethwaite. While I agree he would have done a very good job, I've always pictured Alun Armstrong. Not as high profile as Hurt or Neeson, but he does play stubborn, cynical-with-an-ironclad-code-of-honor with the best of them. He can play comedy too, and he just *looks* like he's spent thirty years walking a beat in the Shades.
 
2012-11-18 02:35:48 AM

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I'm ashamed to admit this, but I'm trying to slog through "Color of Magic," and I just don't think it's very good. It's not clever or amusing or entertaining. I don't see what the attraction is. Is there a better Discworld book I should be reading?


I tried starting "in order" and put it away for many years.
"Going Postal" was a good starting point for me, a bit of Victorian steam punk type tech, and a con-man. No big fantasy wizard plots, but other fantasy themes along with some political stuff.

After that, back tracked to the guards/night watch series, Death series, and finally the witches series.
For me "Going Postal" was the perfect book to get hooked on "discworld" as it didn't have a lot of sword and magic stuff. (but still some elements of that).
 
2012-11-18 03:12:16 AM

optikeye: "Going Postal" was a good starting point for me


If I may interrupt- try Making Money, next. I think that you will thank me later. And then Feet of Clay.
 
2012-11-18 03:18:19 AM

Shadowtag: HighZoolander: I got through about 30 pages of Good Omens before I started hating it. I think it's only the second book (out of hundreds if not thousands) that I've ever started and not finished.

What bothered me most were the incessant "x, y, funny" examples and elaborations that I didn't see the humor in.

Why do people love it?

You read a satirical novel and didn't get that it was satire? I think it isn't so much something is wrong with the book, as something is wrong with you.


I don't remember if I got that it was satire or not in the little of it that I read, but even assuming that I had gotten that (I may have even been told that before I read it), just the fact that it's satire would not have kept me reading past the barrage of tired jokes.

So, you love it just because it was satirical? Not for any other reason?

Clearly I missed whatever humor was present in the book, although I do find it funny that you think something must be wrong with me because I don't love what you love.
 
2012-11-18 03:20:59 AM
For me Wyrd Sisters did it, by the by- a well read copy, with half a cover and I went "expletive times 5, in my head"
This is worth reading. Your Mileage May Vary. Also- the audio books all really are well done. Briggs = the best reader, but you might think different. Each book can take a while and is pretty entertaining if you lack the time to read, so i will throw that out there.
Yeah, I will pitch his wares and get nothing. I do that for good folks, and, for me , I consider myself lucky to haved lived during Terry Pratchett s'time on this rock ( amongst many others ) a blessing.
So that good, but reality tv is still here. Advantage- me
 
2012-11-18 03:29:05 AM
Holy crap. I had no idea there were this many people on Fark with terrible taste. Seriously? Hating onPratchett? There are things open to debate and opinion, and there are things that aren't. "Not my style" That's an opinion. "He's not as good as people say", that would be just wrong. "Oh sure, everyone SAYS the sun rises daily, but I don't think so." That's where you're at.
 
2012-11-18 05:36:15 AM

alienated: optikeye: "Going Postal" was a good starting point for me

If I may interrupt- try Making Money, next. I think that you will thank me later. And then Feet of Clay.


The Truth is also a great stand alone book.

Got a soft spot for Carpe Diem. Like a very good Hammer Horror film.
 
2012-11-18 05:40:15 AM
Oops that should be The Fith Elephant. Great book
 
2012-11-18 07:02:49 AM
If you don't like whatever Pratchett book you started to read just try another one. There are so many genres covered, some heavier on the comedy than others, some with more socio-political comment, some with more magical stuff, some with less, just pick something else. I'd find it hard to pick a favourite, but I'm a big fan of Sam Vimes. He's a deeply flawed character which is always a better read than the standard issue hero.
 
2012-11-18 07:16:15 AM
Giving advice on which books to read is nice. But remember that some should be read before others.

I thought this was a helpful guide (new window)

Even though some novels are better than others, I've enjoyed each one. If for no other reason than to be in the discworld universe again.

I'll even give honorable mention to the animated "Soul Music" movie. Whoever wrote the music has a good ear to mimic the various music styles. I think it and "Wyrd Sisters" are on Netflix.
 
2012-11-18 07:18:48 AM
I didn't really like "Good Omens".

And I'm not a troll. Seriously. I just don't like it. My wife actually wanted a divorce when I said that.

I've just read and seen too many anti-christ/apocalypse fiction to really get into it anymore.

And Heinlen's "Job: A Comedy of Justice" was the greatest Biblical apocalypse novel of all time. OF ALL TIME.
 
2012-11-18 07:38:15 AM
After he was knighted, one of the first things he did was forge his own sword.
He used some Meteorite fragments for good measure.

Link

/Thunderbolt Iron
// Sword should show up as a D&D artifact one of these days
 
2012-11-18 08:42:29 AM

bobbette: To start off with... Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and Oryx & Crake, World War Z by Max Brooks, Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut, and Girlfriend in a Coma by Douglas Coupland. I think you'd also probably like Y: The Last Man.


Thanks, I've read Handmaid's Tale, World War Z, and Cat's Cradle, but I'll give Oryx and Cake and Girlfriend in a Coma a try, probably Y as well. Although the new Dresden book is soon and has priority.

/And +5 cool points for not recommending The Road
 
2012-11-18 10:33:44 AM
So I've been thinking of getting into the Discworld books. I read Colour of Magic a few years ago and did like it quite a bit. For the reading order of other books, is it good enough to simply pick a series (Rincewind/Death/Watch/Witches), and just read those books in order? Or is it necessary to read certain series/books before other ones?
 
2012-11-18 10:56:46 AM

deaccessioned: bobbette: Good Omens is a pretty good book, but it's been overhyped by nerds worse than Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I wouldn't even say it's the best book I've read about an apocalypse. It wouldn't even crack my top 10.

/Sacred cows make the best hamburger

What books about the apocalypse would you recommend? It's looking to be a long cold winter, and I need some reading material.


The Stand by Stephen King (uncut version)

Swan Song by Robert McCammon
 
2012-11-18 11:09:25 AM

NeoCortex42: So I've been thinking of getting into the Discworld books. I read Colour of Magic a few years ago and did like it quite a bit. For the reading order of other books, is it good enough to simply pick a series (Rincewind/Death/Watch/Witches), and just read those books in order? Or is it necessary to read certain series/books before other ones?


I don't think you need to read any series before others. The characters within the series are independent. There is some cross over between the series. There is a scene with Nobby Nobbs and Sgt Colon in most books, and Death in everyone I can remember. But it isn't part of the plot.Not like the confusion you would experience if you read Guards, Guards! after Nightwatch. I would read the Watch series first. But that is my fav so take that with a grain of salt. Of course, If you start with the Death series now you could be reading Hogfather around Dec 25 which would work out pretty well.
 
2012-11-18 11:10:39 AM
All this Pratchett hate?

Wow, it's like I'm really on /lit/.
 
2012-11-18 11:28:19 AM
What made Pratchett on of my favorite authours is the simple line:

"... it lay in wait, like a rake in the grass..."

After I read that line I went out and bought everything he wrote, and I buy new books as they come out. Some are not as good as others. "Moving Pictures" seems to be a long set up for a single joke, it's a funny joke but still. Where "Soul Music" is sort of the same story but much more readable IMHO. I've read 4 different paperback copies of "Guards, Guards" and even a hardcover edition literally to pieces.
 
2012-11-18 12:28:10 PM

The_Philosopher_King: If you start with the Death series now you could be reading Hogfather around Dec 25 which would work out pretty well.


And be watching the movie(my tradition now a family tradition for christmas eve)
 
2012-11-18 02:37:08 PM
There are few books I've laughed harder and more consistently with than Good Omens.
 
2012-11-18 05:04:07 PM

NeoCortex42: So I've been thinking of getting into the Discworld books. I read Colour of Magic a few years ago and did like it quite a bit. For the reading order of other books, is it good enough to simply pick a series (Rincewind/Death/Watch/Witches), and just read those books in order? Or is it necessary to read certain series/books before other ones?


You don't really need to pay attention to order, just be aware that there is one. Every book stands alone, but many of them reference events from others, and the 'sub-groups' often have people visiting from other sub-groups. Eventually all the puzzle pieces fit together, but no book actually depends on any other. Death is in all of them.
 
2012-11-18 06:31:26 PM
I love Discworlds, especially the ones with Moist Von Lipwig being shanghaied into running the weirdy fantasy version of some government edifice.
 
2012-11-18 08:14:58 PM
Currently reading Night Watch in my umpteenth re-read of the Vimes books. During this readthrough, I've decided that the tune of the song in it is "Shortnin' Bread." Or if you like Prairie Home Companion, "Rhubarb Pie."

All the little angels rise up, rise up,
All the little angels rise up high.
 
2012-11-18 11:10:02 PM

kmmontandon: Is it bad that I've got that book almost entirely memorized, including (or, rather, especially) the footnotes?
."


Can't be worse than me having it in my "oughtta read this someday" pile right here in front of me for maybe 9 months now.

Along with a couple of Ludlums....
 
2012-11-19 02:26:45 AM

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I'm ashamed to admit this, but I'm trying to slog through "Color of Magic," and I just don't think it's very good. It's not clever or amusing or entertaining. I don't see what the attraction is. Is there a better Discworld book I should be reading?


Start with "Guard, Guards"
 
2012-11-19 07:00:22 AM
Thanks for the advice, all. I'll give Guards, Guards a try, just to say I gave Pratchett a fair shake.
 
2012-11-19 08:46:09 AM
I've read almost everything Sir Terry has put out, and while it's not all gold, it's all worth reading.


/"You dwarves really love gold, don't you."
//"We only say that to get it into bed."
 
2012-11-19 11:56:57 AM

PirateKing: /"You dwarves really love gold, don't you."
//"We only say that to get it into bed."


Dwarves also love rat onna stick, with catsup.
 
2012-11-19 05:42:34 PM
Man.. i LOVE terry but good omens was complete ass.. amazing idea badly executed...
 
2012-11-19 06:10:04 PM

deaccessioned: bobbette: To start off with... Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and Oryx & Crake, World War Z by Max Brooks, Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut, and Girlfriend in a Coma by Douglas Coupland. I think you'd also probably like Y: The Last Man.

Thanks, I've read Handmaid's Tale, World War Z, and Cat's Cradle, but I'll give Oryx and Cake and Girlfriend in a Coma a try, probably Y as well. Although the new Dresden book is soon and has priority.

/And +5 cool points for not recommending The Road


Old school post-apoc: A Canticle for Liebowitz, The Wanderer (Fritz Lieber), and naturally, I Am Legend (Richard Matheson) The Lieber book isn't as good as the others, but all three are quite interesting.

Re: Pratchett. I read them all in order in college, borrowing them from a guy down the hall in the dorm, but didn't really remember much of them because I mainlined 20-25 books in about 2 weeks. The first new one I noticed and bought for myself was Night's Watch, which immediately got me hooked again. Since then, I've been reading them when they showed up in the used book store, and now that I've moved away, I've filled out the rest of the shelf off the internet. Still need to get a copy of Snuff, but I have the rest of them.

Far and away the best place to start is Guards, Guards. Everything else about the series eventually crosses paths with Ankh-Morpork, and Guards, Guards is the best introduction to the city (it's like a wossername) and the interplay between Vimes and Vetinari is just excellent writing. If you're not going to start with the Watch, start with Death (Mort is the first one) and that'll get you rolling quite nicely. Rincewind and the Witches sort of weave in and out around the edges, but they were also some of the earliest books, so it's harder to get into those series. It definitely pays off, though, about the time you get to Witches Abroad and Lords and Ladies.

Anyway, my .02. He's a great author.
 
Displayed 78 of 78 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report