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(Science News Magazine)   Isn't that cute? Ebola is learning how to fly   (sciencenews.org) divider line 14
    More: Scary, Reston Ebola, scientific reports, route of administration, pig farmer, Industrial Research Organization, University of Manitoba, Australia's Commonwealth Scientific, normal conditions  
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10489 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Nov 2012 at 10:02 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-17 10:32:57 AM  
4 votes:
This is actually kinda fascinating for a number of reasons. Viruses that are blood- or fluid-borne are typically susceptible to drying, while those that are airborne aren't. In order for virus to change transmission modes, there generally needs to be a change in the protein coat that protects it from drying. It doesn't necessarily have to be a major change, but it does still have to happen.

What makes this doubly interesting is that Ebola is a very small virus; it only has about 15,000 bases in its entire genome (bases; not base pairs. This is a mis-sense RNA virus we're talking about) and encodes for a whopping seven proteins. There are a number of tricks that it uses to pull this off, including a ton of overlapping reading frames.

So here we have a small but pretty complicated virus undergoing a mutation that enables a new route of transmission. My question is, does this affect the virulence or lethality in any way?
2012-11-17 12:46:28 PM  
2 votes:
static.guim.co.uk

They grow up so soon!
2012-11-17 10:43:37 AM  
2 votes:

Joelogon: BronyMedic: ms_lara_croft: So scientists did this in a laboratory? Isn't that how Resident Evil got started?

The Reston outbreak in Virginia was what inspired the book "Hot Zone" by Richard Preston. It was discovered in Monkeys in 1989 in a lab, however it is not lab generated.

I live in Reston, about a mile and a half from the where the monkey house was. It was torn down sometime about 1996. Ebola Reston is harmless to humans, with the only symptom is it turns you beige (or another color off the approved palette).


Too bad Ebola doesn't make you immune if you survive it. Ebola Reston might have been a pre-designed natural vaccine.
2012-11-17 09:15:57 AM  
2 votes:
2012-11-17 03:48:26 AM  
2 votes:
Reston Ebola

Ebola Reston, the strain responsible for an Ebola outbreak in a monkey research center in Reston, Virginia has been known to go airborne in the past. It's also incapable of causing disease in humans.
2012-11-17 03:11:29 PM  
1 votes:
Good. We need something new to act as human population control... Every time we cure one thing, something else comes along. There aren't enough distributed resources for everyone and expected growth. The superstitious sky wizard believers want to deny all contraception or other methods of population control... so turn it back over to nature to cull back on the populace, in an albeit more painful and slow way.

/Oh shiat, I'm a human too.. Bummer.
2012-11-17 01:10:44 PM  
1 votes:
blog.zap2it.commassholemommy.com

Did you know that if you play Pink Floyd over the Wizard of Oz you get an unstoppable, airborne, hemmoragic fever? My roommate in college tried it with some acid and he melted.
2012-11-17 12:49:02 PM  
1 votes:

Landis: and encodes for a whopping seven proteins


Really? Those must be crazy nasty proteins to rip the host up like that. Or does Ebola kill through the cellular equivalent of a zergling rush?
2012-11-17 11:38:03 AM  
1 votes:

Landis: This is actually kinda fascinating for a number of reasons. Viruses that are blood- or fluid-borne are typically susceptible to drying, while those that are airborne aren't. In order for virus to change transmission modes, there generally needs to be a change in the protein coat that protects it from drying. It doesn't necessarily have to be a major change, but it does still have to happen.

What makes this doubly interesting is that Ebola is a very small virus; it only has about 15,000 bases in its entire genome (bases; not base pairs. This is a mis-sense RNA virus we're talking about) and encodes for a whopping seven proteins. There are a number of tricks that it uses to pull this off, including a ton of overlapping reading frames.

So here we have a small but pretty complicated virus undergoing a mutation that enables a new route of transmission. My question is, does this affect the virulence or lethality in any way?


Actually that is fascinating!

Thanks
2012-11-17 11:30:38 AM  
1 votes:

Landis: This is actually kinda fascinating for a number of reasons. Viruses that are blood- or fluid-borne are typically susceptible to drying, while those that are airborne aren't. In order for virus to change transmission modes, there generally needs to be a change in the protein coat that protects it from drying. It doesn't necessarily have to be a major change, but it does still have to happen.

What makes this doubly interesting is that Ebola is a very small virus; it only has about 15,000 bases in its entire genome (bases; not base pairs. This is a mis-sense RNA virus we're talking about) and encodes for a whopping seven proteins. There are a number of tricks that it uses to pull this off, including a ton of overlapping reading frames.

So here we have a small but pretty complicated virus undergoing a mutation that enables a new route of transmission. My question is, does this affect the virulence or lethality in any way?


that was lucid, intelligent and informative. Why are you here?
2012-11-17 10:09:16 AM  
1 votes:
Better not tell the President of Madagascar.
2012-11-17 10:06:17 AM  
1 votes:

NewportBarGuy: Shouldn't we be closing our ports?


and shutting down everything
2012-11-17 09:44:26 AM  
1 votes:

BronyMedic: ms_lara_croft: So scientists did this in a laboratory? Isn't that how Resident Evil got started?

The Reston outbreak in Virginia was what inspired the book "Hot Zone" by Richard Preston. It was discovered in Monkeys in 1989 in a lab, however it is not lab generated.


I know that. I wasn't talking about ebola Reston. "Hot Zone" is a fantastic and scary book. Have you read "The Demon In The Freezer"? It's also by Preston and it's about smallpox, amongst other diseases. I was talking about this new news that the virus going airborne was done in a lab.
2012-11-17 08:44:37 AM  
1 votes:

BronyMedic: Reston Ebola

Ebola Reston, the strain responsible for an Ebola outbreak in a monkey research center in Reston, Virginia has been known to go airborne in the past. It's also incapable of causing disease in humans.


Hmm. I didn't think Ebola would be the next plague starter.
 
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