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(Phys Org2)   UK planning to go from 4G to 5G, leaving us all wondering what the hell exactly is a G anyway?   (phys.org) divider line 13
    More: Spiffy, Ofcom, telecommunications, logical possibility, governors  
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2875 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Nov 2012 at 10:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-17 10:33:46 AM  
4 votes:
Generation
2012-11-17 02:01:25 PM  
1 votes:
Back in my day we only had two G's, and we were damn glad to have them.
2012-11-17 12:03:38 PM  
1 votes:

count chocula: madgonad: There really won't be a 5g. An application to utilize it hasn't even been dreamed up. 4g standards go well over 100mbs with extremely low latency. Because wireless devices are generally personal (vs a home connection that might be supplying a dozen connected devices at a time) there just isn't the need for fiberlike speeds over radio waves. We are currently in a phase in which speed is not the limiting factor - you can stream two-way 1080p video with HD audio over current LTE. Capacity is the limiting factor. LTE can wring almost 400mbs out of a 10mhz chunk of spectrum. I know it is boring, but getting that number up is the next challenge.

Have you ever actually run a speed test on your 4G LTE devices? I was using a AT&T 4G LTE USB modem yesterday, and depending on location, my speedtest results varied from 3 to 5mbps download and 0.3 to 3mbps upload. In the middle of silicon valley, I was getting 3up/3down.

I find it hard to believe phones actually can receive data at 100mbps.

I think the whole "G" thing is a marketing gimmick, pure and simple.


I actually work in the industry. Your problem is AT&T - which relates directly to what I was talking about regarding capacity. If you don't have enough spectrum, it doesn't matter how fast your technology can go if too many people have to share. AT&T and Verizon use generally the same technology with the same speed limits - around 50mbs. The problem is that eight people downloading at that limit would complete consume 10mhz of spectrum - which is all AT&T has. So the towers divide the spectrum as fairly (or potentially unfairly if they choose) to meet the needs requested by the customers. If a tower is getting 350 requests for data at the same time, and if it divides it evenly, nobody is going to get more than 1mbs. Verizon has a lot more spectrum for LTE than AT&T, so they are running into capacity issues now (but they will, hence the metering). So when you are getting 3-5mbs, just imagine that as you getting about 1% of the tower's capacity with their other customers using the other 99%. Try that connection again at 4am on a Wednesday and it will be much faster. See, being in the middle of silicon valley means there are far more smartphones per square mile than most other places on earth. I pretty much always get 20-30mbs in the midwest with Verizon - and the 40-50 second latency is just icing on the cake.
2012-11-17 11:49:00 AM  
1 votes:

madgonad: There really won't be a 5g. An application to utilize it hasn't even been dreamed up. 4g standards go well over 100mbs with extremely low latency. Because wireless devices are generally personal (vs a home connection that might be supplying a dozen connected devices at a time) there just isn't the need for fiberlike speeds over radio waves. We are currently in a phase in which speed is not the limiting factor - you can stream two-way 1080p video with HD audio over current LTE. Capacity is the limiting factor. LTE can wring almost 400mbs out of a 10mhz chunk of spectrum. I know it is boring, but getting that number up is the next challenge.


Have you ever actually run a speed test on your 4G LTE devices? I was using a AT&T 4G LTE USB modem yesterday, and depending on location, my speedtest results varied from 3 to 5mbps download and 0.3 to 3mbps upload. In the middle of silicon valley, I was getting 3up/3down.

I find it hard to believe phones actually can receive data at 100mbps.

I think the whole "G" thing is a marketing gimmick, pure and simple.
2012-11-17 11:21:41 AM  
1 votes:
There really won't be a 5g. An application to utilize it hasn't even been dreamed up. 4g standards go well over 100mbs with extremely low latency. Because wireless devices are generally personal (vs a home connection that might be supplying a dozen connected devices at a time) there just isn't the need for fiberlike speeds over radio waves. We are currently in a phase in which speed is not the limiting factor - you can stream two-way 1080p video with HD audio over current LTE. Capacity is the limiting factor. LTE can wring almost 400mbs out of a 10mhz chunk of spectrum. I know it is boring, but getting that number up is the next challenge.
2012-11-17 11:17:21 AM  
1 votes:
There actually was a very specific definition of what "4G" would entail, with connection speeds that had to be met, and specific technologies that had to be used for the connection.

But cellular providers, particularly in the US, got it gutted because they're years and years away from coming close to that standard. So now it just means "marginally better than 3G was."
2012-11-17 10:41:06 AM  
1 votes:

drjekel_mrhyde: Didn't they just start major rollouts of 4G


No, they've1 been on 4G for some time. We're2 the ones that are just starting to get it.

1: The UK
2: The US
2012-11-17 10:34:17 AM  
1 votes:
And here in the US we are still running on 3.5G.
2012-11-17 10:33:57 AM  
1 votes:
Didn't they just start major rollouts of 4G
2012-11-17 09:52:58 AM  
1 votes:
9.8m/s^2?
2012-11-17 08:29:03 AM  
1 votes:
A "G" is one metric gram of internet.
2012-11-17 08:29:01 AM  
1 votes:
So you can reach your data limit even faster
2012-11-17 05:13:07 AM  
1 votes:
apparently mythical spot where phones are really sensitive but when you get your aerial just right can give sensational and fast results. If you miss the small areas it works in, it can leave both phone and user somewhat deflated, which of course is most of the time.
 
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