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(ABC)   Don't forget about the Leonid meteor shower tonight (early this morning). There's no moon this year, and eastern North America is the best viewing   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 41
    More: PSA, Leonids, Geminids, Big Dipper, Quadrantids, meteors, comets, astronomy  
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2653 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Nov 2012 at 6:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-16 02:07:52 PM
I hope it's like 2002. That one was awesome.
 
2012-11-16 02:09:31 PM
There's no moon this year

OH GOD WHAT HAPPENED? Did you take it Subby? Give it back!
 
2012-11-16 02:13:01 PM
And a storm moving in out West

/nuts
 
2012-11-16 03:22:41 PM
That's no no moon!
 
2012-11-16 03:42:34 PM
:-(

Very overcast here today.
 
Pud [TotalFark]
2012-11-16 03:49:46 PM

GAT_00: There's no moon this year

OH GOD WHAT HAPPENED? Did you take it Subby? Give it back!


I think the Chinese bought it for it's lead content
 
2012-11-16 03:50:29 PM
For once we'll have clear skies during a shower. I'll be armed with my telescope and camera. If I catch any really good shots, I'll share em here.
 
2012-11-16 04:03:40 PM

Diogenes: :-(

Very overcast here today.


Here too. Hell, if you're not in eastern Maine or northwestern Vermont, or a very little speck of Connecticut, you can't see shiat right now in New England.
 
2012-11-16 06:13:42 PM
Checks weekend weather forecast:

Rain
Rain
Showers
Rain
Heavy Rain
Heavy Rain
 
2012-11-16 06:16:57 PM

GAT_00: There's no moon this year

OH GOD WHAT HAPPENED? Did you take it Subby? Give it back!


Ask Gru.
 
2012-11-16 06:24:35 PM

Lucky LaRue: I hope it's like 2002. That one was awesome.


No, it won′t be like 2002. That was just after a 33-year cycle of Leonids peaks that often produce true meteor storms (which have an analogous relationship to mere meteor showers as rainstorms to do rainshowers). 1999−2001 were years of storm or near-storm level. We won′t see that again until 2032−2035.

The 1833 storm was particularly intense, inspiring such things as the expulsion of the Mormons from Missouri and other instances of religious-motivated happenings spurred by what many took as a sign from God, and later the song ‶Stars Fell on Alabama."
 
2012-11-16 06:33:21 PM
Tomorrow morning.
 
2012-11-16 06:34:02 PM

COMALite J: Lucky LaRue: I hope it's like 2002. That one was awesome.

No, it won′t be like 2002. That was just after a 33-year cycle of Leonids peaks that often produce true meteor storms (which have an analogous relationship to mere meteor showers as rainstorms to do rainshowers). 1999−2001 were years of storm or near-storm level. We won′t see that again until 2032−2035.

The 1833 storm was particularly intense, inspiring such things as the expulsion of the Mormons from Missouri and other instances of religious-motivated happenings spurred by what many took as a sign from God, and later the song ‶Stars Fell on Alabama."


You seem to have a bit of history in your noggin on such things so I'm inclined to ask... Early to mid 90's during the summer, there was a pretty intense meteor shower over California. Did that happen, or was I really high?

Too bad the weather sucks this weekend.
 
2012-11-16 06:34:40 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: And a storm moving in out West

/nuts


A nut storm? That'll make Castro District residents happy
 
2012-11-16 06:37:06 PM
Now that live out in the sticks, I try to get outside for as many of these as I can. I am not, however, anything resembling an astronomer. I know a few well-known constellations, but that's about it. Dunno exactly where Leo is. Does anyone know of a site where I can plug in my address or something and it tells my dumb ass which way to point my head?

Thanks!

/south-central KY if that's enough for one of you enthusiasts to tell me
 
2012-11-16 06:43:10 PM

23FPB23: Now that live out in the sticks, I try to get outside for as many of these as I can. I am not, however, anything resembling an astronomer. I know a few well-known constellations, but that's about it. Dunno exactly where Leo is. Does anyone know of a site where I can plug in my address or something and it tells my dumb ass which way to point my head?

Thanks!

/south-central KY if that's enough for one of you enthusiasts to tell me


If you have a smart phone there are some free aps for sky gazing that are pretty cool/helpful.
 
2012-11-16 06:53:00 PM
FTFA: "Astronomers will tell you that meteor showers are best if you regard them as something to be savored, rather than awed by. "

...ok, I have no idea what that means, but I'm sure the writer is getting plenty of shiat for that in his office from co-workers for that line.
 
2012-11-16 07:03:47 PM

23FPB23: Now that live out in the sticks, I try to get outside for as many of these as I can. I am not, however, anything resembling an astronomer. I know a few well-known constellations, but that's about it. Dunno exactly where Leo is. Does anyone know of a site where I can plug in my address or something and it tells my dumb ass which way to point my head?
>
Thanks!

/south-central KY if that's enough for one of you enthusiasts to tell me


en.es-static.us
 
2012-11-16 07:06:08 PM

Smeggy Smurf: GAT_00: There's no moon this year

OH GOD WHAT HAPPENED? Did you take it Subby? Give it back!

Ask Grus.


FTFY.

Been seeing bright fireball-type meteors for over a week while observing. Some may be from the Northern Taurid shower, but some may be early Leonids.

One of the most amazing things I've seen in 30+ years of observing was the 98/99 Leonids--like a couple of gods having Roman candle fights.

By the way, if you've never watched a meteor shower before--don't bother with a telescope. Just watch the meteors naked-eye.

\or naked, if you're into that
 
2012-11-16 07:08:27 PM
The one time it rains in Los Angeles....
 
2012-11-16 07:12:09 PM

23FPB23: Now that live out in the sticks, I try to get outside for as many of these as I can. I am not, however, anything resembling an astronomer. I know a few well-known constellations, but that's about it. Dunno exactly where Leo is. Does anyone know of a site where I can plug in my address or something and it tells my dumb ass which way to point my head?

Thanks!

/south-central KY if that's enough for one of you enthusiasts to tell me


Overhead's your best bet. Leo is below the horizon at sunset, but it's also the radiant point; it'll be rising in the east around midnight, and the meteors will come from there and cross the sky, with many of them going overhead-ish.
 
2012-11-16 07:14:40 PM

crotchgrabber: COMALite J: Lucky LaRue: I hope it's like 2002. That one was awesome.

No, it won′t be like 2002. That was just after a 33-year cycle of Leonids peaks that often produce true meteor storms (which have an analogous relationship to mere meteor showers as rainstorms to do rainshowers). 1999−2001 were years of storm or near-storm level. We won′t see that again until 2032−2035.

The 1833 storm was particularly intense, inspiring such things as the expulsion of the Mormons from Missouri and other instances of religious-motivated happenings spurred by what many took as a sign from God, and later the song ‶Stars Fell on Alabama."

You seem to have a bit of history in your noggin on such things so I'm inclined to ask... Early to mid 90's during the summer, there was a pretty intense meteor shower over California. Did that happen, or was I really high?

Too bad the weather sucks this weekend.


That would likely have been the Perseids in mid-August. The Perseids put on a good show just about every year, and many people watch them more than the late autumn and winter showers because of how cold it gets staying out that late at night (August early morning hours tend to be much more pleasant), but never approach true storm status. In a real meteor storm, the whole sky looks like an SF warp-speed effect.

The Leonids are the main ones that have been known to produce actual honest-to-goodness storms, but you′ll have to wait a couple more decades for that. And you have to catch them at just the right time. While the Leonids, like others, last for several days, the peak of a storm cycle, the only time it actually achieves true storm status, often lasts only for minutes.
 
2012-11-16 07:15:34 PM
Nice. Should go well with Drinking Night :D .
 
2012-11-16 07:19:27 PM

COMALite J: The 1833 storm was particularly intense, inspiring such things as the expulsion of the Mormons from Missouri


Will a modest shower in 2012 be sufficient to expel Mitt Romney from the US?
 
2012-11-16 07:26:08 PM
OK thanks for the advice all! Our house sits on a N/S axis, so if you guys are saying overhead-ish, then it should still be OK for me to sit on the back deck, and look east over the roof. Front porch is too small for lounging, otherwise I'd sit out there. It'll be 1 or 2 central before I get home from movies and get good and juiced up, so Leo will be up high enough that I won't miss anything having the horizon blocked by a 1997 single-wide lol!
 
2012-11-16 07:47:43 PM
i301.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-16 07:47:47 PM

natazha: Checks weekend weather forecast:

Rain
Rain
Showers
Rain
Heavy Rain
Heavy Rain


i0.kym-cdn.com
JASON! JASON! JASON!
 
2012-11-16 07:54:16 PM
the-big-bang-theory.com
 
2012-11-16 07:54:34 PM
It's cloudy and raining near Seattle (big shock). Hopefully we might get a clear spot near midnight.
 
2012-11-16 07:59:22 PM

COMALite J: In a real meteor storm, the whole sky looks like an SF warp-speed effect.


I think it was 1969, living in a Seattle suburb... Leonids shower. And it was very much a warp-speed effect in retrospect. An amazing sight. I still swear I could actually hear hissing of things in the air during the event.

/savored the awe 
//still awed
 
2012-11-16 08:19:13 PM
The last meteor shower I watched was spent drunk and wandering around a golf course at night. That was a fun night.
 
2012-11-16 08:26:25 PM
img846.imageshack.us
 
2012-11-16 08:57:49 PM
Light pollution :(
 
2012-11-16 09:50:48 PM
Just rented a 14-24mm f/2.8 for the event.

Gonna head out and see if I can catch any =]
 
2012-11-16 10:32:11 PM
My dad and I never really got along, growing up. But the one time of year, that all fighting was put aside, and a good time was had by all, was during our summer vacation. Every year, he'd take the family on a 2-3 week camping trip through most of the Southwest and the Rockies.

One of my most cherised memories was a night we spent in Rifles Falls, CO when I was about 9. It was time to douse the campfire and turn-in to our repsective tents. My father pulls me aside and tells tell me to head into my tent, and wait until I hear snoring from all my brothers' tents (I was the oldest of four), then grab my sleeping bag, a flashlight, and a folding chair, and meet him up by the van.

We hike a little ways through the woods, (in a well traveled campground), to a clearing we found while hiking earlier that day. We climb in our sleeping bags, and sit in the chairs, while staring at the sky. He goes into a long, detailed description of how meteor showers work (he was a highschool math/science teacher), and spent most of the night watching the most amazing light show I had ever seen, till then or since. Great big, long tailed, comet-looking meteors, will full rainbow colored tails that stretched nearly horizon to horizon (within the clearing of trees). It was really a sight to behold. And a great memory of me and my dad getting along.

Even spending most of my adult life in the American Southwest, and not too close to any major urban areas, I still haven't seen a meteor shower that comes close to comparing to that night.

It's a nice memory.
 
2012-11-16 10:42:18 PM

Cognizer: COMALite J: In a real meteor storm, the whole sky looks like an SF warp-speed effect.


I think it was 1969, living in a Seattle suburb... Leonids shower. And it was very much a warp-speed effect in retrospect. An amazing sight. I still swear I could actually hear hissing of things in the air during the event.

/savored the awe 
//still awed


That might have just been the 1969 talking....
 
2012-11-16 11:22:32 PM
Coastal showers/storms in the area (first time in a while, in fact). As a meteorologist, I'm happy; as a friend of many astro majors, I'm scared they might lynch me.
 
2012-11-17 02:02:40 AM
Eww.

I think these are the ones that leave smoke trails in the sky.
 
2012-11-17 02:23:10 AM

Nuclear Monk: Cognizer: COMALite J: In a real meteor storm, the whole sky looks like an SF warp-speed effect.


I think it was 1969, living in a Seattle suburb... Leonids shower. And it was very much a warp-speed effect in retrospect. An amazing sight. I still swear I could actually hear hissing of things in the air during the event.

/savored the awe 
//still awed

That might have just been the 1969 talking....


Made me LOL.
But... '69 was a good year.
 
2012-11-17 02:54:04 AM

Cognizer: Nuclear Monk: Cognizer: COMALite J: In a real meteor storm, the whole sky looks like an SF warp-speed effect.


I think it was 1969, living in a Seattle suburb... Leonids shower. And it was very much a warp-speed effect in retrospect. An amazing sight. I still swear I could actually hear hissing of things in the air during the event.

/savored the awe 
//still awed

That might have just been the 1969 talking....

Made me LOL.
But... '69 was a good year.


The 1969 Leonids did indeed qualify as a storm. It was 33 years before 2001, the end of that three-year storm peak of the 33-year cycle.
 
2012-11-18 09:57:35 AM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Light pollution :(


I used to be able to see aurora borealis from my folks' back yard in the summer. Between walmart, the hospital, the 'safety lighting' on the high school, and the used car lots (all of which are > 1km away), you can't see a damn thing anymore.
 
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