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(The Consumerist)   A grocery store employee either saved a woman from falling for a scam, or left her grandson to die a slow painful death in the Philippines. One of the two   (consumerist.com) divider line 116
    More: Hero, Philippines, grocery store employee, Hy-Vee, grocery stores  
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15910 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Nov 2012 at 7:15 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-16 08:29:15 PM  

deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.


I kinda fell for that once: Someone said that if you type RONPAUL, it automatically capitalizes it and runs it together - a.k.a. RONPAUL. Not quite the same but I did feel a smidge gullible that day.
 
2012-11-16 08:30:13 PM  

SurfaceTension: My grandma fell for this same scam a few years ago. Felt awful because it was me they were impersonating.


Wait, that was YOU?
 
2012-11-16 08:32:03 PM  

taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?


It's not age. I have a cousin 36 years old with an 11 and 9 year old. She refuses to get a computer or Internet or even educate herself about them. Her answer is either "we are rural" or " they don't need to know that stuff it has no effect on me."

Some people think it is a badge of honor to be willfully ignorant.

/innocent ignorant excluded
 
2012-11-16 08:32:12 PM  

taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?


You have to think of the time period of these people. I'm sure in some cases there might be mild dementia involved, but not in most.

Making a phone call wasn't just serious business it was expensive. My grandfather (I was his favorite :P) loved when I'd call, but never ever failed to worry about the cost. Always offering to call me back...and I'd have to explain each time that it wasn't costing me a dime. It used to, I used to budget money to call him when long distance was expensive.

In their lifetime they're used to such emergencies being managed exactly that way. Today, those of us who deal with modernity would know that we could resolve such a matter in numerous ways. Which is why its always taking place outside the country in a region that elderly people still think of as very 3rd world.

They're strongly driven to help. Let's face it, I didn't call Grandpop when I had to move. I can't think of a time I asked him for anything after I wasn't a little kid anymore. (The demands for ice cream eventually ceased when I could buy my own). I *knew* he was on a fixed income, and while he was fortunate enough to have enough money to do all the things he wanted, I suspect the 'old people are on a fixed income' gets hammered into most family members. They're not asked for anything really. Not even advice so much any more.

And now they have an opportunity to help. They were called, they're the ones who can come to the rescue. And they have the ability to help.

So, you can chalk it up to a huge generational gap, technology gap [especially in a crisis], and a keen desire to be useful and to help their family.

My grandfather passed away a couple of years ago, but I used to seriously worry about what would happen if someone ever harmed him in any way. It's not just about what I'd want to do to someone who did something like that, but getting there faster than the rest of my irish relatives.

And such scams are especially vile to most people because it's not playing on someone's greed. This isn't some dumbass who threw away thousands in the greedy unrealistic hope that a prince's estate was going to make them wildly rich.

Nope, this is old people desperate to help a grandchild in need. It's preying on their fear and love. I think most old people are pretty saavy about get rich quick schemes, they've seen too much of life, and don't have enough of it left to fark around with such silliness. But family?

Makes me so angry just thinking about it.
 
2012-11-16 08:34:40 PM  

Frozboz: Then there's people like me who take it a step farther and bait scammers into creating wooden and bronze AT-ATs:
[i63.photobucket.com image 576x255] 

Link


Um. Reasonably priced these could probably actually sell.

deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.


It works with passwords too. Watch:

Username: darkscout
Password: hunter2
 
2012-11-16 08:38:38 PM  

darkscout: Frozboz: Then there's people like me who take it a step farther and bait scammers into creating wooden and bronze AT-ATs:
[i63.photobucket.com image 576x255] 

Link

Um. Reasonably priced these could probably actually sell.

deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.

It works with passwords too. Watch:

Username: darkscout
Password: hunter2


I checked, that password didn't work. dickhunter2 did though.
 
2012-11-16 08:39:26 PM  

Indubitably: Buy that: lead, please, first. Hunt second.


I read that 5 times, and I still have no idea if auto-correct mangled your post, or if I'm missing the part of my brain that translates gibberish.
 
2012-11-16 08:41:12 PM  

Frozboz: Then there's people like me who take it a step farther and bait scammers into creating wooden and bronze AT-ATs:
[i63.photobucket.com image 576x255] 

Link


Translation: "Go away! Baitin'!"
 
2012-11-16 08:41:54 PM  
Lady Indica:, that was the most touching comment I've read online in a while.
 
2012-11-16 08:52:57 PM  

HighlanderRPI: Guy I used to work with fell for the Russian Girlfriend scam - wired her a bunch of money for a plane ticket and such, then headed to the airport with a little sign to wait at the terminal for her. Even after multiple people at work told him it was a scam.

/she never showed
//He eventually got fired


Yeah... I have an uncle that did the same thing. More than one, in fact, "white bikini model with broken English who is for inexplicable reasons in Ghana and needs $3,000 wired to 'her' to fly to New Jersey and be with him forever".

It's not all about age (my uncle was barely over 50 at the time), although he is a little fried from too many drugs in the 70s.

Good on the HyVee guy for trying to talk sense. It's a hard thing sometimes (when you have someone from the State Department explain that he's being scammed... and he still goes to the airport waiting for Miss Perfect). Unfortunately, Western Union and the other 'money transfer to the third world' companies aren't interested in slowing down the scam trade. It's big money for them.
 
2012-11-16 08:54:37 PM  

taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?


I don't know, but I'm finding myself in that spot. I used to have a graphic design business. I thought my experience in print media--using Adobe software--would help me move on to Web development.

I couldn't keep up with the technology. My clients kept asking for more and more complex sites, and I finally had to tell them to find someone else. (Part of it was unrealistic expectations from my clients. One actually, really, no-crap, told me to go look at Donald Trump's site and make him one that looked like that, for $25 an hour.)

But mainly it was me not having the ability to keep up with changing technology. Not without taking time off to take classes, which I couldn't do and run a business and get a good night's sleep.

I visit science Web sites every day, and have a hard time keeping up with--or even feigning interest in--stuff like nanotechnology and gene therapy. Fascinating, no doubt, but not to a 48-year-old ex-stoner like me. I daily watch my own obsolescence encroaching on what would be an otherwise thrilling time to be alive.
 
2012-11-16 09:05:57 PM  

AssAsInAssassin: Indubitably: Buy that: lead, please, first. Hunt second.

I read that 5 times, and I still have no idea if auto-correct mangled your post, or if I'm missing the part of my brain that translates gibberish.


I lead first, keed second, and hunt third.

Let's consider my words armed and dangerous, since you can't decipher them, okay?

Please find real bad guys.

I am not one of them.
 
2012-11-16 09:06:48 PM  
My elderly mother once gave a guy (friend of her landscaper) named "Snoop Dogg" 5K to further his educational goals, never to see the Dogg again.
Fark: I was paying her back 5K she had lent me at 5% interest.
 
2012-11-16 09:08:22 PM  

BolloxReader: taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?

Yes, it is called getting old. I'm a specialist in senior insurance products, and one of the things that we (should) do is look out for cases of elder abuse, especially financial. Somewhere north of 70, the mind just stops thinking so critically. It's not a case where you can say that "This person is 85 and so is incompetent" (my father's aunt is in her '90s and lives independently, just got her first ever phone a few years ago) but you can say that in most people, for whatever reason, they just become easy to swindle. Many seniors just want to avoid conflict, they appreciate people who pay attention to them, and they know the world has changed a lot since when they were younger.

It's very disheartening how many houses get new roofs or driveways every year. It's even worse how many children and grandchildren activel ...



I'm a specialist in senior insurance products

What the heck are 'senior insurance products?
 
2012-11-16 09:13:30 PM  

kidgenius: taurusowner: deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.

XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Did it work?

It did!

It's good that Drew thought that filter up to help prevent scams here and give FARK a bad name.


But what about Amex numbers?

4321-654987-54321

Hmmm...
 
2012-11-16 09:15:59 PM  
I have a friend who works at a bank who CONSTANTLY has to explain scams to people. Obviously, the bank has strict rules to help protect people against scams, but some people will just argue with them like they really really WANT to fall for the scam. He is like "I can't cash this check for you. We have to see if it is a real check first. Also, this is a well known scam." and they are like "Give me my money!!"

This happened to my SO's grandma. Someone called and said it was her grandson and he was stuck in such and such city and needed some money. Couldn't even tell her which grandson it was though. She was confused because she has 6 grandsons but at least she called one of her kids and they told her it was a scam.
 
2012-11-16 09:16:15 PM  

Frozboz: Then there's people like me who take it a step farther and bait scammers into creating wooden and bronze AT-ATs:
[i63.photobucket.com image 576x255] 

Link


Thank you for that! Spent about 45 min reading your bait. Masterfully done!
 
2012-11-16 09:20:48 PM  

taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?


It's deterioration in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the area of the brain that gives us skepticism.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120816121836.htm
 
2012-11-16 09:22:12 PM  

CPT.Goodlaw: kidgenius: taurusowner: deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.

XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Did it work?

It did!

It's good that Drew thought that filter up to help prevent scams here and give FARK a bad name.

But what about Amex numbers?

4321-654987-54321

Hmmm...


Must need a real number...

XXXX-XXXXXX-XXXXX

Lets see...
 
2012-11-16 09:24:39 PM  
You know young people do fall for stupid things. Thing of everything on Snopes. I just had someone telling me how dangerous it was to be talking on your cell phone at the gas station. I was like 'huh?' and after 20 seconds of googling I find out that is all a rumor.

These are young people who still have a prefrontal cortex, why aren't they skeptical??
 
2012-11-16 09:25:58 PM  
I'm really grateful my grandmother kept her wits the full 95 years, because she had a lot of money squirreled away. We probably would have noticed fairly quickly if she had been scammed, but she had a fair amount to lose so it could have been ugly.

/really wish she was still here
/paid off most of our house with my share though...
 
2012-11-16 09:32:32 PM  

KungFuJunkie: Frozboz: Then there's people like me who take it a step farther and bait scammers into creating wooden and bronze AT-ATs:
[i63.photobucket.com image 576x255] 

Link

Thank you for that! Spent about 45 min reading your bait. Masterfully done!


My pleasure. Justis was such a smug little prick - the real trophy was 'breaking' him & getting him to pay for the entire sculpture plus shipping to my drop box.
 
2012-11-16 09:34:17 PM  

AssAsInAssassin: taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?

I don't know, but I'm finding myself in that spot. I used to have a graphic design business. I thought my experience in print media--using Adobe software--would help me move on to Web development.

I couldn't keep up with the technology. My clients kept asking for more and more complex sites, and I finally had to tell them to find someone else. (Part of it was unrealistic expectations from my clients. One actually, really, no-crap, told me to go look at Donald Trump's site and make him one that looked like that, for $25 an hour.)

But mainly it was me not having the ability to keep up with changing technology. Not without taking time off to take classes, which I couldn't do and run a business and get a good night's sleep.

I visit science Web sites every day, and have a hard time keeping up with--or even feigning int ...


Well, your problem is that you are/were a stoner. Pot is know to permanently lower your intelligence.
 
2012-11-16 09:34:31 PM  

spidermilk: You know young people do fall for stupid things. Thing of everything on Snopes. I just had someone telling me how dangerous it was to be talking on your cell phone at the gas station. I was like 'huh?' and after 20 seconds of googling I find out that is all a rumor.

These are young people who still have a prefrontal cortex, why aren't they skeptical??


Isn't that really overactive skepticism to the point of paranoia? "Hey, don't do this dangerous thing!" when it really isn't dangerous, as opposed to "Okay, I'll do this thing" when you don't realize it is a mistake.
 
2012-11-16 09:36:23 PM  

CujoQuarrel: AssAsInAssassin: taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?

I don't know, but I'm finding myself in that spot. I used to have a graphic design business. I thought my experience in print media--using Adobe software--would help me move on to Web development.

I couldn't keep up with the technology. My clients kept asking for more and more complex sites, and I finally had to tell them to find someone else. (Part of it was unrealistic expectations from my clients. One actually, really, no-crap, told me to go look at Donald Trump's site and make him one that looked like that, for $25 an hour.)

But mainly it was me not having the ability to keep up with changing technology. Not without taking time off to take classes, which I couldn't do and run a business and get a good night's sleep.

I visit science Web sites every day, and have a hard time keeping up with--or ...


Did you really just say that on Fark?
i.imgur.com
 
2012-11-16 09:37:30 PM  

CujoQuarrel: AssAsInAssassin: taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?

I don't know, but I'm finding myself in that spot. I used to have a graphic design business. I thought my experience in print media--using Adobe software--would help me move on to Web development.

I couldn't keep up with the technology. My clients kept asking for more and more complex sites, and I finally had to tell them to find someone else. (Part of it was unrealistic expectations from my clients. One actually, really, no-crap, told me to go look at Donald Trump's site and make him one that looked like that, for $25 an hour.)

But mainly it was me not having the ability to keep up with changing technology. Not without taking time off to take classes, which I couldn't do and run a business and get a good night's sleep.

I visit science Web sites every day, and have a hard time keeping up with--or ...


And assholishness is guaranteed to lower your popularity, man.
 
2012-11-16 09:38:18 PM  

spidermilk: You know young people do fall for stupid things. Thing of everything on Snopes. I just had someone telling me how dangerous it was to be talking on your cell phone at the gas station. I was like 'huh?' and after 20 seconds of googling I find out that is all a rumor.

These are young people who still have a prefrontal cortex, why aren't they skeptical??


c-storeadvisor.gilbarco.com

No comment about the likelihood of a cellphone causing problems at the gas pump...
 
2012-11-16 09:40:02 PM  

Honest Bender: spidermilk: You know young people do fall for stupid things. Thing of everything on Snopes. I just had someone telling me how dangerous it was to be talking on your cell phone at the gas station. I was like 'huh?' and after 20 seconds of googling I find out that is all a rumor.

These are young people who still have a prefrontal cortex, why aren't they skeptical??

[c-storeadvisor.gilbarco.com image 400x352]

No comment about the likelihood of a cellphone causing problems at the gas pump...


Mythbusters has proven this to be 100% false. Getting in and out of the car while pumping however can cause enough static charge to light the fumes. Especially if you're wearing cotton panties and a skirt. Nice, cotton panties.....
 
2012-11-16 09:44:11 PM  

jayphat: Mythbusters has proven this to be 100% false.


I think saying that Mythbusters have "proven" anything is just silly.
 
2012-11-16 09:48:41 PM  

Indubitably: AssAsInAssassin: Indubitably: Buy that: lead, please, first. Hunt second.

I read that 5 times, and I still have no idea if auto-correct mangled your post, or if I'm missing the part of my brain that translates gibberish.

I lead first, keed second, and hunt third.

Let's consider my words armed and dangerous, since you can't decipher them, okay?

Please find real bad guys.

I am not one of them.


I never said you're bad. Just that I can't understand what you're trying to say.

Maybe it's a pop-culture reference or something. (Video game? Obscure novel?) At least we've established that it's not an auto-correct malfunction.

Please find real hostile farkers. I'm not one of them.
 
2012-11-16 09:54:11 PM  
I worked at a large utilities company taking payments over the phone. Well, scam started going around where some people believed Obama was paying $1000 to everyone to pay off their utilities bill. They were all just given the same bank account numbers. They never questioned anything, wouldn't even believe me when I told them it was a scam and would default their payment agreements. The ignorance was unbelievable.
 
2012-11-16 09:56:38 PM  

SeaMonkey311: I worked at a large utilities company taking payments over the phone. Well, scam started going around where some people believed Obama was paying $1000 to everyone to pay off their utilities bill. They were all just given the same bank account numbers. They never questioned anything, wouldn't even believe me when I told them it was a scam and would default their payment agreements. The ignorance was unbelievable.


What's the other part of the scam? Did they have to pay an "opening fee" to get the bank account number or something?
 
2012-11-16 09:59:17 PM  

yukichigai: SeaMonkey311: I worked at a large utilities company taking payments over the phone. Well, scam started going around where some people believed Obama was paying $1000 to everyone to pay off their utilities bill. They were all just given the same bank account numbers. They never questioned anything, wouldn't even believe me when I told them it was a scam and would default their payment agreements. The ignorance was unbelievable.

What's the other part of the scam? Did they have to pay an "opening fee" to get the bank account number or something?


Nothing. They were told by relatives and given the bank account numbers over the phone. The people initially falling for the scam handed over their SSN's and such. I had one lady insist it was her bank account. I knew the routing numbers for my state and knew it was the scam. Tried to convince her but ooooooh no it was hers, she saw the money.
 
2012-11-16 10:01:06 PM  
It's not my 77 year old mother who is the problem. There is NOTHING wrong with her critical thinking, and she plays with the scammers on the phone before letting them down heavily. She has 11 kids, and there is no way she can send $2K to save any of them - she has a life to live yet and we are all adults. She remarried after my dad died and she and her husband have different last names, so if they ask for Mrs. "Husbands Name" she will play with them as well, because obviously they have no idea and are cold calling.

I suppose if she got a call saying "Your son needs money in someplace" she would have to ask "Which son are you??" since there are 6 of them.

No, it's not Mom I worry about. It's my youngest brother who apparently keeps finding "girlfriends" in Africa who need just a couple of hundred dollars to get out of trouble and pay for their Visa to Canada. My Mom keeps telling him it's a scam, but he is so starved for a new girlfriend he would do almost anything. He is only 42 .....
 
2012-11-16 10:20:11 PM  

Needlessly Complicated: kidgenius: deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.

I know! That filter saved me once before too.

Here's my SSN:

XXX-XX-XXXX

Here's my Discover card number:

5438-3000-1345-0013

Did that work?


HA1111
You played right into the trap !!!
He0llo new flat screen TV ...he-heee
 
2012-11-16 10:25:53 PM  
I almost died a slow, painful death in the Philippines, but a shot of penicillin fixed me right up.
 
2012-11-16 10:37:15 PM  

Honest Bender: spidermilk: You know young people do fall for stupid things. Thing of everything on Snopes. I just had someone telling me how dangerous it was to be talking on your cell phone at the gas station. I was like 'huh?' and after 20 seconds of googling I find out that is all a rumor.

These are young people who still have a prefrontal cortex, why aren't they skeptical??

[c-storeadvisor.gilbarco.com image 400x352]

No comment about the likelihood of a cellphone causing problems at the gas pump...


Yours doesn't shoot sparks? Man I need a new phone.
 
2012-11-16 10:39:38 PM  

ModernLuddite: 2) A lot of people believe that you get infirm as you age, and talk themselves into it. My mother works at a retirement home, and says she sees it all the time - people who are perfectly healthy, and relatively young, who are just crippled because they think they are. There are examples of people who live perfectly normal, active lives until they die. My great grandfather used to climb up on his roof and do home repairs because the grandkids were, quote, "pussies".


I don't think that is the case. my grandfather, god love him, has a cabin in minnesota. he tries like hell to mow the lawn against the protests of his sons and myself... he just wants to do it, but when it comes to gutters, he knows his limitations. now when it comes to playing catchphrase during family game time around the holidays.... well, id rather have my six year old son on my team.

what i am saying is that he hasnt given up on life, but his faculties are escaping him. HOWEVER he was telling me a story about how some guy was trying to scam him and he knew from the start it was BS. so there ya go

/csb
 
2012-11-16 10:39:50 PM  

Needlessly Complicated: kidgenius: deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.

I know! That filter saved me once before too.

Here's my SSN:

XXX-XX-XXXX

Here's my Discover card number:

5438-3000-1345-0013

Did that work?


Any idiot can find someone's credit card number, since it is printed on the damn card. It's useless without a PIN.
 
2012-11-16 11:33:42 PM  
To the 2 idiots that published their credit card numbers on the internet; proving how gullible you are: I hope your identity gets stolen and you lose thousands of dollars and waste days of your life dealing with the consequences of your stupidity.
 
2012-11-16 11:35:00 PM  

Tyrion's Favorite Wench: To the 2 idiots that published their credit card numbers on the internet; proving how gullible you are: I hope your identity gets stolen and you lose thousands of dollars and waste days of your life dealing with the consequences of your stupidity.


They're joking.
 
2012-11-16 11:57:17 PM  

CujoQuarrel: AssAsInAssassin: taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?

I don't know, but I'm finding myself in that spot. I used to have a graphic design business. I thought my experience in print media--using Adobe software--would help me move on to Web development.

I couldn't keep up with the technology. My clients kept asking for more and more complex sites, and I finally had to tell them to find someone else. (Part of it was unrealistic expectations from my clients. One actually, really, no-crap, told me to go look at Donald Trump's site and make him one that looked like that, for $25 an hour.)

But mainly it was me not having the ability to keep up with changing technology. Not without taking time off to take classes, which I couldn't do and run a business and get a good night's sleep.

I visit science Web sites every day, and have a hard time keeping up with--or ...


Not smoking didn't help you any, I see.
 
2012-11-17 12:00:16 AM  

jayphat: CujoQuarrel: AssAsInAssassin: taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?

I don't know, but I'm finding myself in that spot. I used to have a graphic design business. I thought my experience in print media--using Adobe software--would help me move on to Web development.

I couldn't keep up with the technology. My clients kept asking for more and more complex sites, and I finally had to tell them to find someone else. (Part of it was unrealistic expectations from my clients. One actually, really, no-crap, told me to go look at Donald Trump's site and make him one that looked like that, for $25 an hour.)

But mainly it was me not having the ability to keep up with changing technology. Not without taking time off to take classes, which I couldn't do and run a business and get a good night's sleep.

I visit science Web sites every day, and have a hard time keeping ...


Why? Are you suggesting Farkers have poor social skills, and needlessly attack people who show any sign of weakness?

Man, that's cold. I hope Farkers don't notice that you said that about them. 'Cause things could get ugly if you're right.

/You're wrong. Relax.
 
2012-11-17 12:20:03 AM  

darkscout: Frozboz: Then there's people like me who take it a step farther and bait scammers into creating wooden and bronze AT-ATs:
[i63.photobucket.com image 576x255] 

Link

Um. Reasonably priced these could probably actually sell.

deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.

It works with passwords too. Watch:

Username: darkscout
Password: hunter2


You can't fool me. I know your password is really "1234".
 
2012-11-17 12:20:43 AM  

xynix: gopher321: Elderly - walking ATMs.

Sad how naive they are. My grandfather talks about shiat like this all the time and I shoot him down time and again. He also calls KFC a "chicken restaurant." They're living in different versions of reality.


But aging is wonderful and fantastic and makes us better and smarter and stronger and faster and wiser.
 
2012-11-17 12:27:02 AM  

Billy Bathsalt: My elderly mother once gave a guy (friend of her landscaper) named "Snoop Dogg" 5K to further his educational goals, never to see the Dogg again.
Fark: I was paying her back 5K she had lent me at 5% interest.


I got off easy. I learned my lesson in high school with a loan of $20.
 
2012-11-17 12:27:41 AM  

liltingbanshee: I know a lady who fell for this scam. This is the same 86 year old lady who got taken by the "phone call from Microsoft" scam. She is a very intelligent and well-educated person, too, not senile as far as I can tell. I don't know why she falls for these things.


I suspect contributing factors like not having had any contact with no-good dirtbags earlier in life and so not having developed the proper antibodies.
 
2012-11-17 12:52:40 AM  

deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.


OK, I'll bite and give it a try with a SSN:

042-68-4425

If this works I'll try a credit card # or three...
 
2012-11-17 01:40:22 AM  
My father-in-law fell for the grandson in Canada needing money scam a couple of years ago, they got around 5k from him before the rest of the family caught on. When my sister-in-law found out and attempted to stop him from sending money to her "son" he could not be convinced that he wasn't stuck in Canada, even though they had been to the son's house the night before.
 
2012-11-17 03:43:25 AM  

liltingbanshee: I know a lady who fell for this scam. This is the same 86 year old lady who got taken by the "phone call from Microsoft" scam. She is a very intelligent and well-educated person, too, not senile as far as I can tell. I don't know why she falls for these things.


I had Microsoft on the phone the other day. I gave him a piece of my mind.
 
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