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(BBC)   Ham radio operator in Ireland helps US passenger jet trying to land in Boston during hurricane Sandy   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 85
    More: Spiffy, County Tyrone, Ireland, Mr. Young, passenger jet, sheds  
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3685 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Nov 2012 at 5:21 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-16 01:39:19 PM  
This thread is now about Ham Radio Farkers.

/KE7QOM
 
2012-11-16 01:45:52 PM  
This has to be bullshiat. Pilots have direct contact with their dispatch center. There are no gaps across the Atlantic. The dispatch center has direct access to ATC. It is satellite based so the repeaters have nothing to do with it. In fact, it is so clear it is like talking on the phone. My favorite use is to get sports scores...
 
2012-11-16 01:57:54 PM  

RedPhoenix122: This thread is now about Ham Radio Farkers.


73's
 
2012-11-16 02:28:36 PM  
When all else fails, Ham Radio.

73

KF7YDL
 
2012-11-16 02:41:47 PM  

wineskigolf: This has to be bullshiat. Pilots have direct contact with their dispatch center. There are no gaps across the Atlantic. The dispatch center has direct access to ATC. It is satellite based so the repeaters have nothing to do with it. In fact, it is so clear it is like talking on the phone. My favorite use is to get sports scores...


If the antenna farm at the airport is trashed then ground control and dispatch can't uplink to the satellite.
 
2012-11-16 03:25:49 PM  
i1079.photobucket.com
Commander Buck O'Murdock
 
2012-11-16 03:29:52 PM  
For what it's worth. I was listening on HF during that storm and the signals were really strong here in Western PA.
 
2012-11-16 04:02:29 PM  
ha it is ham radio because he is plump
 
2012-11-16 05:25:26 PM  
i always wanted a ham radio
 
2012-11-16 05:31:32 PM  
Why no Hero tag?
 
2012-11-16 05:34:33 PM  
Stop! HAMmer time!
 
2012-11-16 05:35:30 PM  
Hallicrafters S38e
/all i got
 
2012-11-16 05:50:10 PM  

RedPhoenix122: This thread is now about Ham Radio Farkers.

/KE7QOM


N5XNS, Licensed since 1991.
 
2012-11-16 06:02:52 PM  
Pretth sure the article got some of the details wrong, but bravo for him. Not at all unusual for a station 2000 miles away to hear ya when a station 200 miles away cannot.

Check out Gander on 10.051 (IIRC - doing this from memory) and you can hear some trans- atlantic traffic.

/W0ODS
//Used to be a commercial op on ships
/// dit dit
 
2012-11-16 06:28:34 PM  

DarthBart: RedPhoenix122: This thread is now about Ham Radio Farkers.

/KE7QOM

N5XNS, Licensed since 1991.


Only 2007 here, but I'm 2nd generation. My dad's been one for a hell of a lot longer.
 
2012-11-16 06:42:18 PM  
Good for him, I do wish the article had mentioned what band this was on.


KF5NOL

/Just how many hams read fark?
 
2012-11-16 06:49:08 PM  

devine: /Just how many hams read fark?


Ham radio requires a decent amount of technical knowledge coupled with an inordinate amount of time to waste.

Just like Fark.
 
2012-11-16 06:51:28 PM  
KA1VJU here checking in, and I don't understand why a commercial airliner was on ham bands, they have lots of redundant freqs of their own they should have been able to get someone via sat or commercial hf or even vhf along the east coast.
 
2012-11-16 06:56:33 PM  

dmegin: KA1VJU here checking in, and I don't understand why a commercial airliner was on ham bands, they have lots of redundant freqs of their own they should have been able to get someone via sat or commercial hf or even vhf along the east coast.


Might have been that, or the ham may have been listening into non-ham bands.
 
2012-11-16 07:03:59 PM  
KF5SMW

Licensed about two weeks now. Still haven't actually transmitted yet though.

/Also a private pilot. This story is relevant to my interests.
 
2012-11-16 07:05:55 PM  
So, of the operators checking in, anyone in Maryland, possibly NE of Baltimore? Would like to know if there's any good nets on the FM frequencies out here.
 
2012-11-16 07:13:24 PM  
Newer ham here KD8RVW

Nice to see Hams making the news for good things. Wonder what the whole story is?
 
2012-11-16 07:18:26 PM  
No way the guy in TFA is a Ham. That desk is way too clean, and I have a hard time believing those monitors were found in a dumpster.
 
2012-11-16 07:23:43 PM  
73,
KB4OQ, licensed since 1978
 
2012-11-16 07:30:19 PM  
inlaurensopinion.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-11-16 07:38:38 PM  

wambu: 73,
KB4OQ, licensed since 1978


I'm a ham, I don't want to give my call sign here though. I've got an N9 call.
 
2012-11-16 07:46:37 PM  

RedPhoenix122: dmegin: KA1VJU here checking in, and I don't understand why a commercial airliner was on ham bands, they have lots of redundant freqs of their own they should have been able to get someone via sat or commercial hf or even vhf along the east coast.

Might have been that, or the ham may have been listening into non-ham bands.


Yep. I listen to the HF air bands all the time.
 
2012-11-16 08:13:31 PM  
73's folks

/Tech ticket for 10 years
 
2012-11-16 08:58:11 PM  
Ham here, too... but not giving out my contact info to you shady motherfarkers.
 
2012-11-16 09:18:11 PM  
How hard is it to get into ham radio? Expensive? Most cool hobbies are. I think it would be interesting to talk to somebody on the other side of the earth without using the internet or telephone.
 
2012-11-16 09:18:34 PM  
I've always been intrigued by the idea of ham, but never tinkered around with it. Is there anything useful that can be done besides talk to a bunch of drunk farkers and old military farts?
 
2012-11-16 09:21:51 PM  
73
DE KB9NDF
 
2012-11-16 09:36:07 PM  
KC0NKI, ham since 2002 mainly for skywarn.
 
2012-11-16 09:37:01 PM  

puppetmaster745: Ham here, too... but not giving out my contact info to you shady motherfarkers.


QSL?
 
2012-11-16 09:38:25 PM  

duffblue: How hard is it to get into ham radio? Expensive? Most cool hobbies are. I think it would be interesting to talk to somebody on the other side of the earth without using the internet or telephone.


Took me about 2 or 3 weeks then an 8 hour class to get my Tech. A lot of places are offering "Ham in a day" when you can get your license in one single day. You don't learn a thing, but you can get your license that way. Then to get started, you can get a 2meter portable radio for under $100 (as cheap as $45 + shipping). Sadly this process is turning out a lot of bad amateurs since they never bother to actually learn proper radio etiquette. Got a few that constantly keep the repeaters busy with constant chatter and will even butt in to your conversation with no added value.

If it's something you've always wanted to do though, locate your local ham radio club and talk to them. Some of the nicest people I've met, a bit odd but nice and helpful.
 
2012-11-16 09:49:29 PM  

ad_rizzle: I've always been intrigued by the idea of ham, but never tinkered around with it. Is there anything useful that can be done besides talk to a bunch of drunk farkers and old military farts?


I don't understand the last part of the question?
 
2012-11-16 10:09:18 PM  

duffblue: How hard is it to get into ham radio? Expensive? Most cool hobbies are. I think it would be interesting to talk to somebody on the other side of the earth without using the internet or telephone.


Tech level is pretty easy. Very limited privileges and idiot proof cheap radios, but effectively expanded greatly now due to the advent of the Winsystem, ILRP, and Echolink (look it up). These internet aided ham radio venues allow international com with the basic license. About 500,000 US citizens are Techs.

The next, and most useful, level is General. The test is much more difficult and the privileges greatly expanded. Here, radio to radio com is possible and common worldwide. The radios can be pricey and complicated. As are the antenna systems. The modes of communication run the gammet from voice, Morse code to extremely sophisticated digital. Even includes TV!. About 100,000 US citizens are Generals.

Extra Class is the top class. Mainly prestige. Slightly more access to the bands. Very difficult test. At the Radio Engineer level. I'll take it next year. About 100,000 US citizens are Extras.

Lots of nerdish way to spend time and money. Lots of self important aholes balanced by truly
nice people (like every human endeavor) in the hobby.
 
2012-11-16 10:10:30 PM  
W3JAR, 73
 
2012-11-16 10:16:31 PM  

MFAWG: ad_rizzle: I've always been intrigued by the idea of ham, but never tinkered around with it. Is there anything useful that can be done besides talk to a bunch of drunk farkers and old military farts?

I don't understand the last part of the question?



i132.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-16 10:35:29 PM  

smells_like_meat: The next, and most useful, level is General. The test is much more difficult and the privileges greatly expanded. Here, radio to radio com is possible and common worldwide. The radios can be pricey and complicated. As are the antenna systems. The modes of communication run the gammet from voice, Morse code to extremely sophisticated digital. Even includes TV!. About 100,000 US citizens are Generals.

Extra Class is the top class. Mainly prestige. Slightly more access to the bands. Very difficult test. At the Radio Engineer level. I'll take it next year. About 100,000 US citizens are Extras.


It's not true that pricey or elaborate gear is needed for General/Extra level operating. Before I moved overseas and had to put my shack in storage, I worked north of 200 countries with a Kenwood TS-480 (~$800 used) and a fan dipole in the attic (less than $50 in parts total). Granted most of that was on digital modes and CW where a weak signal gets out much better than voice.

The general and extra exams are, like the tech exam, multiple choice and the FCC publishes the entire pool of potential questions. The advantage to the extra class is that it gives you access to frequencies where rare stations (especially DXpeditions) tend to hang out, so if you're interested in reaching some place like Sao Tome or Vanuatu it's beneficial. There's also just the sense of satisfaction of knowing that you're allowed to operate anywhere in any mode that it's legal for a ham operator to do so.

Some of the electronic theory on the extra exam is a little hard, but it can most definitely be done. I passed it after a month or so of studying with a Gordon West study guide. IMHO it's what you do once you've passed the exam that's important, not the exam itself.
 
2012-11-16 10:41:03 PM  
And say "Hi" to me cousin Sully when ya get there!
 
2012-11-16 11:13:03 PM  
Hi hams,
N9XUX checking in. 73.
 
2012-11-16 11:40:36 PM  

ad_rizzle: I've always been intrigued by the idea of ham, but never tinkered around with it. Is there anything useful that can be done besides talk to a bunch of drunk farkers and old military farts?


Depends on who you get involved with. I've been with clubs that run the entire spectrum.

A club I was (Laurel Amateur Radio Club, Laurel MD) with in Maryland was down assisting with the clean up at the Pentagon after 9/11 (I did not go down there, unfortunately) and they assisted with communications after an F3 tornado came through town. They also did public service communications during the towns occasional festivals (which kept the police and fire bands free from unnecessary chatter). We were in the process of building out a digital radio network to supplement the state disaster services group.

Another club I was looking into in Florida was strictly a social group. They'd meet at an American Legion hall, sit around smoke and have beers, and once a year they'd do Field Day. That was it. I did not join that group.

My current club (Fort Myers Amateur Radio Club) does Field Day, a few contests during the year, and the occasional tech discussion at the meetings. A subcommittee of the club does emergency communications during disasters.

So, you can be one of the people who sits at their desk at 4am trying to catch that elusive contact from West ByGod Pango Pango or you can be out in the pouring rain helping facilitate rescues and emergency supplies with the local fire department because their main radio system is overloaded or was knocked out by a 145MPH wind gust. Or you can be both. Or neither. Its a matter of what you want to do.
 
2012-11-16 11:54:06 PM  
KE7IXP, licensed since ~2006.
 
2012-11-17 01:03:14 AM  

schief2: smells_like_meat: The next, and most useful, level is General. The test is much more difficult and the privileges greatly expanded. Here, radio to radio com is possible and common worldwide. The radios can be pricey and complicated. As are the antenna systems. The modes of communication run the gammet from voice, Morse code to extremely sophisticated digital. Even includes TV!. About 100,000 US citizens are Generals.

Extra Class is the top class. Mainly prestige. Slightly more access to the bands. Very difficult test. At the Radio Engineer level. I'll take it next year. About 100,000 US citizens are Extras.

It's not true that pricey or elaborate gear is needed for General/Extra level operating. Before I moved overseas and had to put my shack in storage, I worked north of 200 countries with a Kenwood TS-480 (~$800 used) and a fan dipole in the attic (less than $50 in parts total). Granted most of that was on digital modes and CW where a weak signal gets out much better than voice.

The general and extra exams are, like the tech exam, multiple choice and the FCC publishes the entire pool of potential questions. The advantage to the extra class is that it gives you access to frequencies where rare stations (especially DXpeditions) tend to hang out, so if you're interested in reaching some place like Sao Tome or Vanuatu it's beneficial. There's also just the sense of satisfaction of knowing that you're allowed to operate anywhere in any mode that it's legal for a ham operator to do so.

Some of the electronic theory on the extra exam is a little hard, but it can most definitely be done. I passed it after a month or so of studying with a Gordon West study guide. IMHO it's what you do once you've passed the exam that's important, not the exam itself.


Most of what you say is true. A significant number of people would disagree with you that $800 used is inexpensive. I do love my TS-480 though.
 
2012-11-17 01:07:01 AM  
VK6-NONE-OF-YOUR-FARKING-BUSINESS
1978
KN MF
 
2012-11-17 01:11:04 AM  

smells_like_meat: Most of what you say is true. A significant number of people would disagree with you that $800 used is inexpensive. I do love my TS-480 though.


Yeah, I realized after I hit 'add comment' it that it might come across the wrong way.

I should have added that when you consider that a decent ham radio can last you 20 years or more (and unlike a lot of electronic gear holds decent resale value), as a one-time cost it's not bad. I've met more than a few hams that were happily tooling away on 40 or 50-year-old Heathkits, though I do like at least a FEW modern conveniences in my rig...
 
2012-11-17 01:37:53 AM  

schief2: smells_like_meat: Most of what you say is true. A significant number of people would disagree with you that $800 used is inexpensive. I do love my TS-480 though.

Yeah, I realized after I hit 'add comment' it that it might come across the wrong way.

I should have added that when you consider that a decent ham radio can last you 20 years or more (and unlike a lot of electronic gear holds decent resale value), as a one-time cost it's not bad. I've met more than a few hams that were happily tooling away on 40 or 50-year-old Heathkits, though I do like at least a FEW modern conveniences in my rig...


I just bought my TS-480 . Very nice. I likely will never buy another HF rig. But that won't keep me from buying and rebuilding "boat anchors". I've got a Heathkit HW-29 "Sixer" on the bench now. 10 watts AM, 6 meters. Orphan to the max. I love it.
 
2012-11-17 02:02:30 AM  

RedPhoenix122: dmegin: KA1VJU here checking in, and I don't understand why a commercial airliner was on ham bands, they have lots of redundant freqs of their own they should have been able to get someone via sat or commercial hf or even vhf along the east coast.

Might have been that, or the ham may have been listening into non-ham bands.


Or they were on the edge of a frequency rage, or were on "shared" frequency ranges. My guess would be that one of them was off-band, though.
 
2012-11-17 02:05:09 AM  

smells_like_meat: I just bought my TS-480


Neat. The SAT one, or the one with the 200W amplifier?

Bob Down: VK6-NONE-OF-YOUR-FARKING-BUSINESS
1978


I feel likewise, so greetings from VA3/VE3 land. Licensed 2001, and was grandfathered onto (most) HF bands (like a boss).
 
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