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(BGR)   The smugness of Apple fans, the delusions of BlackBerry fans, and other Google autofill revelations   (bgr.com) divider line 107
    More: Amusing, Apple Inc., BlackBerry, Google, collective intelligence, equity research, human emotions, company, Google autofill  
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13091 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Nov 2012 at 1:03 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-17 01:42:19 PM

Dinjiin: crabsno termites: thank you, sir. Hard drives have made programmers into dolts. Programs used to have to be simple, efficient, elegant. Today, they bare shiat: "Buy a bigger hard drive." I still have some DOS programs on 5 1/4 discs (RBase - DBase was shiat) that I use.

True, but I'm going to play devil's advocate here for a minute.

As you start moving up through increasingly higher level languages, you're going to see code bloat...When you consider that developers are a fixed cost while hardware is constantly getting cheaper, you ...


Yeah, I can definitely see the financial aspects coming into play with code bloat. And it's been amazing to see the tech change my game character from a clump of colored blocks into something that looks and sounds like a real person. What I think ticks me off the most is Windows assumption that no user ever wants to geek out occasionally and have a look under the hood, do some maintenance, tinker with the engine.

I do have an A+ certification, but I'm not interested in being a full-fledged mechanic. I'm just interested in having a basic grasp of how things work, how the parts (hardware and software) relate to each other, etc. I also adore simple software that does just one or two things, but does them really well. It seems like software designers are becoming more interested in impressing other designers than they are in addressing actual user needs.
 
2012-11-17 04:59:09 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: Flab: ringersol: xynix: "If someone can solve the KB problems on touch screens"

It seems everyone has largely given up and are trying to solve the text entry problem with cloud-driven voice conversion.
Which is great and all, except that it completely falls apart for composing anything more than small snippets of text, which is precisely where touch keyboards are such a problem in the first place.
(Not to mention dictation being innately undesirable in many situations.)

Which is to say: goddammitsomuch.

/ though I get more out of apps and a good browser than I do a good keyboard
// it'd still be nice to have a good keyboard
/// asetniop looks promising, but it's a 'tablet' solution at best; not really relevant to phones
//// and even then, likely a 10" tablet solution

"Cloud solutions" are frowned upon by many companies that are afraid of having company secrets stored on Google or Apple servers for ever.

i thought cloud was just a generic term meaning server. not Google server or Apple server, but generic server.

but since storage space can be continually upgraded, cause it's cheap. it's a cloud instead of a "server"


"Cloud computing" is the new name for "server farm". However, cloud-based voice recognition apps, such as Siri, are run from Apple's server farms, and therefore, your voice snippets are saved on Apple-owned servers, which means Apple can theoretically know of your trade secrets.

Many large companies ban the use of "public" cloud-based storage, including Siri, for that reason.
 
2012-11-17 07:08:59 PM

WordyGrrl: What I think ticks me off the most is Windows assumption that no user ever wants to geek out occasionally and have a look under the hood, do some maintenance, tinker with the engine.


I have an eight book volume set on Windows workstation and server administration on the bookshelf behind me. There are pages and pages dedicated to fine tuning Windows performance. Most can be set through cryptic keys in the registry. But it is a PITA to do so.

Even with an OS like FreeBSD or Linux, you can have several dozen sysctl variables to mess with. You also have hundreds of options to tinker with when you build your own kernel.

In either case, the learning curve is so steep that most people never get into it. It isn't like the old days when there were a couple of flags to set with emm386.exe or himem.sys in your startup file. And the badge of pride that most people used to get when tweaking the last few KB of low memory out of their system is gone. I have a four core proc with 12GB of mem. I really don't see a need to fuss with the memory settings, except maybe to tweak the CAS latencies in BIOS as low as I can before I get a BSoD.

Some hobbyists do still like to spank the hardware directly in their code. I use emulators of old systems to do that myself. Modern systems are so complex that even if there was an easy way to write a kernel module, you'd run into that learning curve problem again.  I learned to program Z80 assembly on my C128 emulator. I then went on to learn 8086 assembly through DOSBox.
 
2012-11-18 12:23:41 AM
Dinjiin: Lastly, programs are much more complex these days. Look at what Mosaic could do versus the latest version of Firefox.

My take, as a programmer, is that "feature rich" is only good if you're actually going to use all of those features. And if I had the time, I would like to rip all sorts of "features" out of several programs that I otherwise love.

EX: I would toss synch out of firefox (who the hell actually uses that?).
 
2012-11-18 12:27:28 AM
Flab: "Cloud computing" is the new name for "server farm".

Internet connected server farm.

// lots of our boxes are not "in the cloud" because they have no access to "teh internets" ... because they're full of company secrets.
 
2012-11-18 03:11:07 AM

Dinjiin: I assumed that Core would be used for virtual machine deployments. Instead of using RDS to remote into a VM and use local GUI tools to configure the box, you'd have a central admin server that could batch deploy settings and issue remote commands. Which would really come in handy if your VMs tend to be members of clusters where it is common for multiple VMs to have nearly identical images on them.  Tweak the settings you want and hit "deploy to all".


Great idea, but we just deploy the core images from a VM template - same result.

Core isn't a bad idea, it's just an unfulfilled one. I can script a deployment of a SLES or RedHat box, but I can't script a deployment of a Windows Core box unless it's running services MS thought to include with proper command line instructions. Powershell is getting better and better, but there are still settings you can't access without remote GUI access.
 
2012-11-18 10:15:18 AM

lordargent: Dinjiin: Lastly, programs are much more complex these days. Look at what Mosaic could do versus the latest version of Firefox.

My take, as a programmer, is that "feature rich" is only good if you're actually going to use all of those features. And if I had the time, I would like to rip all sorts of "features" out of several programs that I otherwise love.

EX: I would toss synch out of firefox (who the hell actually uses that?).


Argh. This. And who the hell uses all 600+ "features" of Word or Excel? Wouldn't it make more sense to sell a lower-priced basic version -- then offer "expansion packs" with those added features for accountants or publishing houses? I have a lotta love for companies that open up their products to modders -- and as a result are still able to sell respectable amounts of 10+ year old software (ex: Bethesda's "Morrowind").

And to Dinjiin: That new steep learning curve frustrates the hell outta me, especially when I know what's wrong, what needs to be done to fix it -- but I can't get to it anymore because Windows won't let me, dammit. Eh, at least I knew what to tell the tech at the puter repair shop. *sigh*
 
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