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(BGR)   The smugness of Apple fans, the delusions of BlackBerry fans, and other Google autofill revelations   (bgr.com) divider line 107
    More: Amusing, Apple Inc., BlackBerry, Google, collective intelligence, equity research, human emotions, company, Google autofill  
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13100 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Nov 2012 at 1:03 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-16 02:27:34 PM  

Girion47:

Oooo if you don't need those Halo 4 codes, can I have them?

/EIP


Have at 'em! Want these mod codes for Battlefield 3 Armored Kill too?



/I wish, I don't even own an xBox.....*sigh*
 
2012-11-16 02:29:11 PM  

shazbotuh:

As for me- I just forgot to quote your post to include with my reply.. *facepalm*


yeah. I've done worse in my years. :)
 
2012-11-16 02:31:15 PM  
Google auto-fills based on search history for a biased article. Search history is biased.


This and more obvious news at 11.



/if you think auto-fill is anything more than predictive search habits, you are fooling yourself.
 
2012-11-16 02:32:53 PM  

mcwehrle: Girion47:

Oooo if you don't need those Halo 4 codes, can I have them?

/EIP

Have at 'em! Want these mod codes for Battlefield 3 Armored Kill too?



/I wish, I don't even own an xBox.....*sigh*


I don't play Battlefield.
 
2012-11-16 02:33:03 PM  
I am meticulous. I am impatient. I am demanding. I want things to work and I like for them to work well. I don't care what country/company makes or designs the product. I want the best for my money every time I spend it.

When I bought a TV I chose Samsung. When I bought a handgun I chose Glock. When I bought kitchen knives I chose Shun. When I bought a car I chose BMW. When I bought a smartphone I chose the iPhone. When I bought a tablet I chose the iPad.

I had a Droid and it was much much worse, in many many ways. The iPhone is better, period. This may not be the case forever, but it is true today. I don't care how you try to justify your love for Droids (not wanting to be a "sheep", wanting control over your processor speed, needing a stupid SD card, blah blah). Just know that you are naive and ignorant. I am better than you and I know what's best for myself and for you.

I know these things not by what others tell me, but by my own experience. I was a late adapter of Apple products. I had 2 mp3 players before my first iPod. I reluctantly bought my first MacBook in 2007 and after using it for a week I haven't looked back. It really boggles my mind why Apple haters can't admit the superiority of Apple products.

By the way, I am not trolling. This is all the honest truth.

Smug enough?

/the only thing Droid is good for is keeping Apple on their toes
 
2012-11-16 02:33:54 PM  
Why is anyone a "fan" of a corporation?
 
2012-11-16 02:34:51 PM  

Girion47: mcwehrle: Girion47:

Oooo if you don't need those Halo 4 codes, can I have them?

/EIP

Have at 'em! Want these mod codes for Battlefield 3 Armored Kill too?



/I wish, I don't even own an xBox.....*sigh*

I don't play Battlefield.



'Kay.

More popcorn?
 
2012-11-16 02:36:48 PM  

Dinjiin: TimonC346: I miss that keyboard. I really do--even now probably being able to type fast on the IPhone

Yeah, I know a lot of people who wish there was a version of the iPhone with a real QWERTY keyboard.

The Motorola Droid series probably has the nicest QWERTY keyboards of all the Android phones, but then you're stuck buying a Motorola. A *LOT* of people were pissed that the Droid 3 won't be upgraded to Ice Cream Sandwich, which isn't the first time that Moto dumped support for a phone so quickly. And the Droid 4 dropped GSM/UMTS roaming, so it is worthless outside of North America since it can't handle European and Asian LTE bands.

The Samsung QWERTY keyboards are kinda meh, and they tend to be on older models. The Sony-Ericsson Xperia keyboards aren't all that great either, and they're also limited to older models these days. 

I'm really hoping for a Google Nexus phone to be released with a real QWERTY keyboard that meets or beats those from Motorola. Now that Google owns Moto Mobility, maybe that'll happen at some point.


I have a nokia C300, it's not a "smart"phone, but it's how i use fark, facebook, etc...

I love the keyboard on this thing and absolutely DESPISE touchscreen keybosrds. I need to feel actual buttons under my fingers, and the ones on this phone are big enough, and raised enough that my typing speed is pretty good. Only thing that sucks is when one of my thumbnails breaks and neets to be cut off. Then i feel clumsy.

/two-thumbed typist
 
2012-11-16 02:38:53 PM  

ZeroCorpse: The way I see it, Blackberry is the redheaded stepchild here. Let's stop arguing Android vs. iOS and point and laugh at the people still using Blackberry devices in 2013.


What you fail to realize is that most people still using a BB do so to conduct business and only business. As I sit in first class I'm surrounded by people clicking away on their 4 year old BBs. All that bullshiat you just talked about is exactly why I'm not interested in those devices. I don't want "options" I don't want to "configure" or "download" or any of that other crap. I want a single device I can shove into my back pocket and deliver typo-free emails with when necessity dictates. If I lose the device I simply replace it and call my IT helpdesk who then admits the device into the BES and everything I had on my phone before I lost it is back. It's a 5 minute process.

I don't have to worry about storage, or memory management (WTF is this 1992?), nor do I need to worry about bloatware, or usage tracking, or any of the rest of the bullshiat your talking about. I never have to reboot it, reset it, reconfigure it, and in fact I haven't turned the thing completely off for over 6 months if at all this year. I need something that writes emails. Get it? That's why people still use BBs.

I can tell you this though, if RIM goes the route of Apple, Samsung etc and just makes another iPhone clone then I'll not be buying their product. They need to retain the KB and avoid all the crap you talked about. I have no desire to configure a farking phone.
 
2012-11-16 02:45:22 PM  

xynix: ZeroCorpse: The way I see it, Blackberry is the redheaded stepchild here. Let's stop arguing Android vs. iOS and point and laugh at the people still using Blackberry devices in 2013.

What you fail to realize is that most people still using a BB do so to conduct business and only business. As I sit in first class I'm surrounded by people clicking away on their 4 year old BBs. All that bullshiat you just talked about is exactly why I'm not interested in those devices. I don't want "options" I don't want to "configure" or "download" or any of that other crap. I want a single device I can shove into my back pocket and deliver typo-free emails with when necessity dictates. If I lose the device I simply replace it and call my IT helpdesk who then admits the device into the BES and everything I had on my phone before I lost it is back. It's a 5 minute process.

I don't have to worry about storage, or memory management (WTF is this 1992?), nor do I need to worry about bloatware, or usage tracking, or any of the rest of the bullshiat your talking about. I never have to reboot it, reset it, reconfigure it, and in fact I haven't turned the thing completely off for over 6 months if at all this year. I need something that writes emails. Get it? That's why people still use BBs.

I can tell you this though, if RIM goes the route of Apple, Samsung etc and just makes another iPhone clone then I'll not be buying their product. They need to retain the KB and avoid all the crap you talked about. I have no desire to configure a farking phone.


I work for ATT and there have always been a plethora of devices with android with physical keyboards, even in the blackberry form factor...

Blackberry also used to have a client app for windows phones, nokias, and androids to connect to bes, but when they realized their phones couldn't compete on features, they removed support for the apps.

When I sit in first class most people have an iphone or a high end android.

When I worked in Latin America last year, all the execs in the companies I dealt with had iphones or Galaxies.

And now working back at ATT, we are watching blackberry fade away.
 
2012-11-16 02:48:28 PM  
Hmmm Android with a keyboard? No way. Except since their inception they have always been availible.

www.htc.com
 
2012-11-16 02:48:38 PM  
ZeroCorpse: The way I see it, Blackberry is the redheaded stepchild here. Let's stop arguing Android vs. iOS and point and laugh at the people still using Blackberry devices in 2013.



The fact that the phone you use is subject for mockery in your world is, in fact, a hilarious concept.

/farkin nerds
 
2012-11-16 02:48:43 PM  
Why is Fark
... down

That is the only auto-fill. I don't know why people'd even search; answer is always the same: beer, servers, etc.
 
2012-11-16 02:55:35 PM  

farknbord: I am meticulous. I am impatient. I am demanding. I want things to work and I like for them to work well. I don't care what country/company makes or designs the product. I want the best for my money every time I spend it.

When I bought a TV I chose Samsung. When I bought a handgun I chose Glock. When I bought kitchen knives I chose Shun. When I bought a car I chose BMW. When I bought a smartphone I chose the iPhone. When I bought a tablet I chose the iPad.

I had a Droid and it was much much worse, in many many ways. The iPhone is better, period. This may not be the case forever, but it is true today. I don't care how you try to justify your love for Droids (not wanting to be a "sheep", wanting control over your processor speed, needing a stupid SD card, blah blah). Just know that you are naive and ignorant. I am better than you and I know what's best for myself and for you.

I know these things not by what others tell me, but by my own experience. I was a late adapter of Apple products. I had 2 mp3 players before my first iPod. I reluctantly bought my first MacBook in 2007 and after using it for a week I haven't looked back. It really boggles my mind why Apple haters can't admit the superiority of Apple products.

By the way, I am not trolling. This is all the honest truth.

Smug enough?

/the only thing Droid is good for is keeping Apple on their toes


You sound fun.

/and by fun, I mean douche-like.
 
2012-11-16 03:05:59 PM  
I love Apple products. They're neat toys. A bit overpriced, though.
 
2012-11-16 03:12:46 PM  
I just want to juxtapose this:

mooseyfate: I have two auto-fills that made me want to commit suicide:

I was searching for how do I find something or another in Skyrim. I typed in "how do I" and the first auto fill suggestion was "How do I have sex with my sister". Another time, a work friend was looking up something about a light bulb and he typed in "why are there" and the first auto fill was "why are there ants crawling out of my butt". Wtf?


with this:

tforbes: Google auto-fills based on search history for a biased article. Search history is biased.

 
2012-11-16 03:15:57 PM  

farknbord: I am meticulous. I am impatient. I am demanding. I want things to work and I like for them to work well. I don't care what country/company makes or designs the product. I want the best for my money every time I spend it.

When I bought a TV I chose Samsung. When I bought a handgun I chose Glock. When I bought kitchen knives I chose Shun. When I bought a car I chose BMW. When I bought a smartphone I chose the iPhone. When I bought a tablet I chose the iPad.

I had a Droid and it was much much worse, in many many ways. The iPhone is better, period. This may not be the case forever, but it is true today. I don't care how you try to justify your love for Droids (not wanting to be a "sheep", wanting control over your processor speed, needing a stupid SD card, blah blah). Just know that you are naive and ignorant. I am better than you and I know what's best for myself and for you.

I know these things not by what others tell me, but by my own experience. I was a late adapter of Apple products. I had 2 mp3 players before my first iPod. I reluctantly bought my first MacBook in 2007 and after using it for a week I haven't looked back. It really boggles my mind why Apple haters can't admit the superiority of Apple products.

By the way, I am not trolling. This is all the honest truth.

Smug enough?

/the only thing Droid is good for is keeping Apple on their toes


Those are big character flaws. To claim to be better than others and admitting two faults is an odd choice in your argument. Maybe using a bit of ad hominem with this, but still.

An I disagree with almost all of your statements, but I don't understand the fervent banner waving of either sides.
 
2012-11-16 03:17:10 PM  
I apologize for the over-bolding. Apparently my preview first option was disabled.
 
2012-11-16 03:30:38 PM  
I don't know what you guys are talking about. BBs are awesome. They are free, because the company pays for them, they never fail, they have apps, such as Pandora, you can surf the web, and the KB is so much better than iOS software KB. My wife has an iPhone, but she uses my BB more because she is tired of the autofills and long it takes to peck away what you want to say. Facetime is good, but I don't use it as much, and if your accent is bad forget about Siri. 1st class to and from big cities or coasts is full of iPhones, but 1st class anywhere on flyover country is dominated by BBs.
 
2012-11-16 03:31:41 PM  
I've seen some interesting and amusing auto-fill search lists out there, so I know they exist
 
2012-11-16 03:46:02 PM  

elgrancerdo: I don't know what you guys are talking about. BBs are awesome. They are free, because the company pays for them, they never fail, they have apps, such as Pandora, you can surf the web, and the KB is so much better than iOS software KB. My wife has an iPhone, but she uses my BB more because she is tired of the autofills and long it takes to peck away what you want to say. Facetime is good, but I don't use it as much, and if your accent is bad forget about Siri. 1st class to and from big cities or coasts is full of iPhones, but 1st class anywhere on flyover country is dominated by BBs.


Pretty much. The difference between upgrades given to techies that are flying intercoastal often and executives who have first class paid for internationally.

For me at least it boils down to this: I need a device to send email with. Period. I don't have time to shop around looking for a replacement of a perfectly good object that does that task perfectly. In fact I carry around a spare BB that I got on Ebay for $30 bucks. All I need to do if I lose my current BB is call Verizon on the replacement and have them activate it. 5 minutes. Then call IT and have them update it will all my data. 5 minutes. Done. The replacement phone was cheaper than a replacement from Assurance which is $50. No brainer.

Those devices have all kinds of fun shiat in them that I'll never use nor ever care about. They're much better at doing bullshiat I don't care about and I'll admit to that fact readily. At sending email they suck, I've used them, I ended up giving the iPhone to my girlfriend and replacing it with my BB after a week.

Say your job is delivering sheet-rock. You could get an Escalade and it would be feature rich and very slick. Or you could get a 72' dodge with a camper top and do the same task. Less bells and whistles sure, but you're delivering sheet-rock, not driving customers to expensive dinners.

I'm also going to get one of those new Asus Taichi netbooks.. That will allow me to do the other business tasks I need in a very crisp manner: Word, Excel, PPT, and Outlook. I'm not going to use it to play an MMO or the latest hotest game so why should I buy something that allows for that? I want it to do 4 tasks only as mentioned above.
 
2012-11-16 03:49:32 PM  

farknbord: t really boggles my mind why Apple haters can't admit the superiority of Apple products.


One cannot admit what one doesn't know. This ridiculous Apple vs Microsoft|Android|__________ thing has been going on for decades. I, too, was a late adopted of Apple, even though I owned a IIe for years long ago. I used Intel gear for years, but ran Solaris or Linux on it. like everyone else, I was stuck with Windows at work for all the office productivity things. So I decided to put up a windows machine at home. As I was installing the OS, my machine was hacked! Screw this. My wife needed a new computer and wanted to try a Mac. So in 2007, I bought her an iMac. I plugged it in, turned it on assigned it a name and an IP and that was that. It has run perfectly ever since, with nothing more than a few patches and OS updates. She has not had a single problem. So in 2008, I bought myself one. Same deal. In 2009, I bought myself a MacBook pro. When I cranked it up, I talked to Apple and told me that it could automatically set up my machine to be the same as my desktop. I let it do it and then it cloned all the applications, documents and data from my desktop to my laptop. Sweet.

Microsoft has come a long way with Windows and it is a much more stable and usable than it was five years ago, but it is almost painfully obsolete, when compared to the way Apple has integrated its desktops, laptops, mobile devices and its cloud. Android shares much of the same advantages because it too is UNIX-based (OS X and iOS are based in Darwin and Android is based in Linux, both BSD derivatives). But Windows is mature, solid and stable, with a lot of useful applications. I can understand why people who have worked in it their entire lives would have no interest in changing. Nonetheless, I have let quite a few people fiddle around with my MacBook and like you, switched to Mac and never looked back.
 
2012-11-16 04:23:37 PM  
I took a used, factory-unlocked iPhone 4 with me to England this week. I hardly have to charge it. I took a gazillion pictures (many with flash) with it in London today, surfed the web on the train to/fro, checked email, etc., and it still has 73% power remaining on the battery. There's no way my Samsung Galaxy S2 (running Android OS) would have managed that. Heck, its battery would have been dead before noon.

I've had my S2 for about a year now and have yet to fall in love with it. It looks like I'm going back to iPhone for good.
 
2012-11-16 04:47:26 PM  

FizixJunkee: I took a used, factory-unlocked iPhone 4 with me to England this week. I hardly have to charge it. I took a gazillion pictures (many with flash) with it in London today, surfed the web on the train to/fro, checked email, etc., and it still has 73% power remaining on the battery. There's no way my Samsung Galaxy S2 (running Android OS) would have managed that. Heck, its battery would have been dead before noon.

I've had my S2 for about a year now and have yet to fall in love with it. It looks like I'm going back to iPhone for good.


iPhone is pretty good on battery life if you be selective with pushes, badges, and location services, etc. Turn on too much of that crap and your battery will be dead in about three hours of normal use. I'm still on 3 (upgrading soon) and not being able to find a cell network really hammers battery life. I'm told that this has improved in the newer models.

My wife's buying me an iPad next week. Yes! Finally.
 
2012-11-16 04:50:36 PM  

JackieRabbit: Microsoft has come a long way with Windows and it is a much more stable and usable than it was five years ago, but it is almost painfully obsolete, when compared to the way Apple has integrated its desktops, laptops, mobile devices and its cloud. Android shares much of the same advantages because it too is UNIX-based (OS X and iOS are based in Darwin and Android is based in Linux, both BSD derivatives). But Windows is mature, solid and stable, with a lot of useful applications. I can understand why people who have worked in it their entire lives would have no interest in changing. Nonetheless, I have let quite a few people fiddle around with my MacBook and like you, switched to Mac and never looked back.


For me it boils down to the fact that the Mac laptops and desktops are painfully overpriced. I can build a PC that utterly destroys the comparatively priced Mac. And odds are, I wouldn't bother, I'd keep the hundreds of dollars difference. All of my clients/applications/business needs are easily met on the PC, and no one has given me a good enough reason to switch, other than a sense of superiority.
 
2012-11-16 05:13:30 PM  

Hebalo: For me it boils down to the fact that the Mac laptops and desktops are painfully overpriced. I can build a PC that utterly destroys the comparatively priced Mac. And odds are, I wouldn't bother, I'd keep the hundreds of dollars difference. All of my clients/applications/business needs are easily met on the PC, and no one has given me a good enough reason to switch, other than a sense of superiority.


Ah, a reasonable man. If PCs work for you, there's no need to change. And it you can build a PC, you know enough to buy the right components and build a reliable machine. But most PC manufacturers use commodity components and sometimes they are cheap and kludgy. Apples do cost a bit more (MacBooks start at $1200 and iMacs at $1300), but believe me, they are worth it. All Apple components are designed by Apple and manufactured to strict specifications. One never needs to worry about compatibility issues. Inasmuch as Macs processors are now 2.7GHz to 3.2 GHz quad-core Intel Core i5, I question if any PC can outperform them (my 2.8 GHz Duo smokes). But I don't use PC, so I don't really know. To me, given Apple's renowned quality and reliability and that I like OS X so much, a 27" 3.2 GHz quad-core, with 8 GB memory, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 675MX graphics and a 1 TB hard drive for $2000 seems a pretty good deal. But then a long time long ago in a galaxy far, far away, I paid $3000 for an Apple IIe. Damn, we've come a long way fast....
 
2012-11-16 05:14:19 PM  
The Blackberry 8830 World Edition had the best keyboard ever paired to a phone. It's a shame the rest of it was such shiat:

www.brighthand.com

/hot, like your mom
 
2012-11-16 05:16:45 PM  

FizixJunkee: I took a used, factory-unlocked iPhone 4 with me to England this week. I hardly have to charge it. I took a gazillion pictures (many with flash) with it in London today, surfed the web on the train to/fro, checked email, etc., and it still has 73% power remaining on the battery. There's no way my Samsung Galaxy S2 (running Android OS) would have managed that. Heck, its battery would have been dead before noon.

I've had my S2 for about a year now and have yet to fall in love with it. It looks like I'm going back to iPhone for good.


I have a Galaxy S2, and I have all the services turned off except email, text, and I run an App called Juice Defender for the batter(apple will not approve it for the iphone) and I can go 2 days between charges. It also uses location services to turn wifi off when i leave the house, turn cell data on on the ride to work, turn it off when i walk into work, and turn it on when i leave, and turn it off and turn back wifi on when i go home.

Plus it has a 64 memory card in it.

Literally took me 5 dollars for the app, and about ten minutes to set it up to work like that. Plus, it is 4g, of course you could turn the 4g radio off in it to further increase battery life.
 
2012-11-16 05:24:19 PM  

theflatline: FizixJunkee: I took a used, factory-unlocked iPhone 4 with me to England this week. I hardly have to charge it. I took a gazillion pictures (many with flash) with it in London today, surfed the web on the train to/fro, checked email, etc., and it still has 73% power remaining on the battery. There's no way my Samsung Galaxy S2 (running Android OS) would have managed that. Heck, its battery would have been dead before noon.

I've had my S2 for about a year now and have yet to fall in love with it. It looks like I'm going back to iPhone for good.

I have a Galaxy S2, and I have all the services turned off except email, text, and I run an App called Juice Defender for the batter(apple will not approve it for the iphone) and I can go 2 days between charges. It also uses location services to turn wifi off when i leave the house, turn cell data on on the ride to work, turn it off when i walk into work, and turn it on when i leave, and turn it off and turn back wifi on when i go home.

Plus it has a 64 memory card in it.

Literally took me 5 dollars for the app, and about ten minutes to set it up to work like that. Plus, it is 4g, of course you could turn the 4g radio off in it to further increase battery life.


My old Razr, which is essentially what you have, if you have everything turned off beside email test and phone, would beat this. As for the other things you mention, iPhone (and every other smartphone) does the same thing and you can disable cell data and only get data when on WiFi. This is what I do, since I may have unlimited data now, but I know I won't for much longer and I don't really need this when I'm traveling, so there's not need to eat through battery power.
 
2012-11-16 05:40:45 PM  

theflatline: I have a Galaxy S2, and I have all the services turned off except email, text, and I run an App called Juice Defender for the batter(apple will not approve it for the iphone) and I can go 2 days between charges. It also uses location services to turn wifi off when i leave the house, turn cell data on on the ride to work, turn it off when i walk into work, and turn it on when i leave, and turn it off and turn back wifi on when i go home.


That's pretty impressive.. 2 days.. My Blackberry only lasts for 4 days when using it constantly. Looks like I need to upgrade! 2 is better than 4 right? Granted while using GPS navigation it only lasts for 8 hours but I got a 3 pack of batteries on Ebay for $10 so I can swap them out if I happen to be driving for 8 hours which I would never do. I also have the phone I got from Ebay and it's battery so 20 days of constant use without using a recharge for $20 sucks. Seriously I need one of these newer smart phones.
 
2012-11-16 06:27:36 PM  
Why is Tero Kuittnen...

...a useless hack
...a douchebag
...a sack of crap
 
2012-11-16 06:47:25 PM  

ChimbleySweep: I just want to juxtapose this:

mooseyfate: I have two auto-fills that made me want to commit suicide:

I was searching for how do I find something or another in Skyrim. I typed in "how do I" and the first auto fill suggestion was "How do I have sex with my sister". Another time, a work friend was looking up something about a light bulb and he typed in "why are there" and the first auto fill was "why are there ants crawling out of my butt". Wtf?

with this:

tforbes: Google auto-fills based on search history for a biased article. Search history is biased.


I knew typing in "how do I have sex with a sista" would come back to haunt me...
 
2012-11-16 06:54:52 PM  

Hebalo: JackieRabbit: Microsoft has come a long way with Windows and it is a much more stable and usable than it was five years ago, but it is almost painfully obsolete, when compared to the way Apple has integrated its desktops, laptops, mobile devices and its cloud. Android shares much of the same advantages because it too is UNIX-based (OS X and iOS are based in Darwin and Android is based in Linux, both BSD derivatives). But Windows is mature, solid and stable, with a lot of useful applications. I can understand why people who have worked in it their entire lives would have no interest in changing. Nonetheless, I have let quite a few people fiddle around with my MacBook and like you, switched to Mac and never looked back.

For me it boils down to the fact that the Mac laptops and desktops are painfully overpriced. I can build a PC that utterly destroys the comparatively priced Mac. And odds are, I wouldn't bother, I'd keep the hundreds of dollars difference. All of my clients/applications/business needs are easily met on the PC, and no one has given me a good enough reason to switch, other than a sense of superiority.


Heh, that's funny. The cost difference is why I generally use Linux instead of Windows. I do have a dual boot Linux/Windows box at home, but I built that when I had a MS Developer's license and could get the OS for "free". (The license was about $2K, but hey, they sent me OS install disks.) Hell, Linux is even easier to install, when you are installing your own OS instead of buying it pre-installed. I bought an iMac when I thought I'd write some iPhone apps. (This was before Android.) It is rock solid and easy to use, and while I tend to grab fee MacPorts software for it rather than buy stuff, upgrading the OS has been dirt cheap: not as cheap as free Linux, but cheaper than new versions of Windows.

As far as the actual thread and Android vs iPhone vs BB, BB has one advantage not mentioned here: they don't all have cameras. The US govt supplies them to some of their own for working in classified environments. The lack of a camera, which also applies to many large corporations, is one reason. I'm sure there are other differences for meeting security requirements that allowed them to be blessed for use in secure environments, and not others.
 
2012-11-16 07:34:54 PM  

SlowMind: As far as the actual thread and Android vs iPhone vs BB, BB has one advantage not mentioned here: they don't all have cameras


Many data center facilities will not allow cameras onto the raised floor. Our own company had this policy for many years, which is why I kept a Nokia 6310i as a personal phone long past its prime. It also meant that I was stuck with the choice of carrying a company issued BlackBerry or a low-end camera-free mobile handset. I held out as long as I could, with my last handset being the Nokia 2705 CF before being handed a BB Torch.

Some companies have started to relent since it is nearly impossible to find a camera-free mobile phone anymore. And you see this in the form of more BlackBerries having cameras. I expect that even camera-free BlackBerries will be a rarity soon, if they aren't already.
 
2012-11-16 07:40:14 PM  
Ok, I LOL'd..

why is apple suing samsung
why is apple so successful
why is apple called apple

Good question on #1 return.
 
2012-11-16 08:31:15 PM  

Dinjiin: SlowMind: As far as the actual thread and Android vs iPhone vs BB, BB has one advantage not mentioned here: they don't all have cameras

Many data center facilities will not allow cameras onto the raised floor. Our own company had this policy for many years, which is why I kept a Nokia 6310i as a personal phone long past its prime. It also meant that I was stuck with the choice of carrying a company issued BlackBerry or a low-end camera-free mobile handset. I held out as long as I could, with my last handset being the Nokia 2705 CF before being handed a BB Torch.

Some companies have started to relent since it is nearly impossible to find a camera-free mobile phone anymore. And you see this in the form of more BlackBerries having cameras. I expect that even camera-free BlackBerries will be a rarity soon, if they aren't already.


I had the same issue at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, for obvious reasons.
 
2012-11-16 08:33:48 PM  

farknbord: I am meticulous. I am impatient. I am demanding. I want things to work and I like for them to work well. I don't care what country/company makes or designs the product. I want the best for my money every time I spend it.

When I bought a TV I chose Samsung. When I bought a handgun I chose Glock. When I bought kitchen knives I chose Shun. When I bought a car I chose BMW. When I bought a smartphone I chose the iPhone. When I bought a tablet I chose the iPad.

I had a Droid and it was much much worse, in many many ways. The iPhone is better, period. This may not be the case forever, but it is true today. I don't care how you try to justify your love for Droids (not wanting to be a "sheep", wanting control over your processor speed, needing a stupid SD card, blah blah). Just know that you are naive and ignorant. I am better than you and I know what's best for myself and for you.

I know these things not by what others tell me, but by my own experience. I was a late adapter of Apple products. I had 2 mp3 players before my first iPod. I reluctantly bought my first MacBook in 2007 and after using it for a week I haven't looked back. It really boggles my mind why Apple haters can't admit the superiority of Apple products.

By the way, I am not trolling. This is all the honest truth.

Smug enough?

/the only thing Droid is good for is keeping Apple on their toes


img189.imageshack.us
 
2012-11-16 09:09:52 PM  

Dinjiin: SlowMind: As far as the actual thread and Android vs iPhone vs BB, BB has one advantage not mentioned here: they don't all have cameras

Many data center facilities will not allow cameras onto the raised floor. Our own company had this policy for many years, which is why I kept a Nokia 6310i as a personal phone long past its prime. It also meant that I was stuck with the choice of carrying a company issued BlackBerry or a low-end camera-free mobile handset. I held out as long as I could, with my last handset being the Nokia 2705 CF before being handed a BB Torch.

Some companies have started to relent since it is nearly impossible to find a camera-free mobile phone anymore. And you see this in the form of more BlackBerries having cameras. I expect that even camera-free BlackBerries will be a rarity soon, if they aren't already.


Ironically, disabling the camera is one of the security policies you can enforce on a Blackberry that's on a BES, so provided you have the system set up, it doesn't matter if the phone comes with a camera or not.

Shame they are going out of business, if I was in a paranoid field and I wanted to make sure I had a secure phone, Blackberry was tops. Nothing else comes close.

But I'm not in a paranoid field, and neither are most other people.
 
2012-11-16 10:26:12 PM  

crabsno termites: /Two best systems ever: DOS (yes, I'm old - used to calculate Std Dev by hand) and Wndws 3.1 (probably a Luddite also).


I do miss that aspect of DOS that allowed you to do anything or examine anything you wanted, if you knew the commands to type in. There are a lot of things that are much faster to do in DOS, but Windows makes it a pain to get there.

And when Win 3.1 was around, I don't recall ever spending 20+ minutes trying to re-find a file. Everything was right there, in one of a few little windows/files on the desktop. There were some practical, very useful and simple aspects of the older tech that I wish were still present in some form today.

/I sound old. And a little biatchy.
//Bartender? Another round, please.
 
2012-11-16 11:04:31 PM  
TheAlmightyOS: I can already tell this will be a rational and calm discussion about personal preferences

Speaking of personal preferences, this is stupid because the autofill results are catered to the individual.

For example someone (Special20) could do a search and get this.

Special20:

i.imgur.com

And someone else (ME!) can do the same search and get this.

www.lordargent.com
 
2012-11-16 11:17:26 PM  

WordyGrrl: I do miss that aspect of DOS that allowed you to do anything or examine anything you wanted, if you knew the commands to type in. There are a lot of things that are much faster to do in DOS, but Windows makes it a pain to get there.


Microsoft has been making it so that you can view more and more about your system via a shell. There is actually a version of Windows Server that does not have a GUI. I believe that the Windows PowerShell was a significant step in making that happen. The problem though is that Windows is so utterly complex, it is near impossible to do it w/o piles of books.

The various Unixes are a bit easier, especially if you do not have X Windows installed. It didn't take me too long to figure the layout of FreeBSD, although I admit that I am still a bit of a novice when it comes to tools like awk and sed. Most everything is still stored in a text file so it is easy to dig around and learn.
 
2012-11-16 11:43:16 PM  

Dinjiin: There is actually a version of Windows Server that does not have a GUI.


Windows Core is an abomination against God and humanity. I'm a RHCE and an MCITP:EA - the command line doesn't trouble me. We moved a large amount of our services to Windows servers for application reasons. I realize that Windows Core is relatively new, so there aren't many management tools for it, but it's all absolute bullshiat. If you really need to configure a Core server, you need another server or workstation that can connect to it so you can use the GUI tools on the remote workstation. Microsoft clearly built it to serve as an appliance OS. Configure once and then leave it alone. God forbid you ever have to troubleshoot issues on it.

I have no problem with a command line OS. Windows Core isn't that. It's a Windows Server that has had the GUI removed, and all the options aren't available unless you have a GUI on another box to manage it.
 
2012-11-17 02:12:17 AM  

Lsherm: Windows Core is an abomination against God and humanity.


That good, huh?


Lsherm: Microsoft clearly built it to serve as an appliance OS. Configure once and then leave it alone. God forbid you ever have to troubleshoot issues on it.

I assumed that Core would be used for virtual machine deployments. Instead of using RDS to remote into a VM and use local GUI tools to configure the box, you'd have a central admin server that could batch deploy settings and issue remote commands. Which would really come in handy if your VMs tend to be members of clusters where it is common for multiple VMs to have nearly identical images on them.  Tweak the settings you want and hit "deploy to all".
 
2012-11-17 02:53:46 AM  

WordyGrrl: crabsno termites: /Two best systems ever: DOS (yes, I'm old - used to calculate Std Dev by hand) and Wndws 3.1 (probably a Luddite also).

I do miss that aspect of DOS that allowed you to do anything or examine anything you wanted, if you knew the commands to type in. There are a lot of things that are much faster to do in DOS, but Windows makes it a pain to get there.

And when Win 3.1 was around, I don't recall ever spending 20+ minutes trying to re-find a file. Everything was right there, in one of a few little windows/files on the desktop. There were some practical, very useful and simple aspects of the older tech that I wish were still present in some form today.

/I sound old. And a little biatchy.
//Bartender? Another round, please.


thank you, sir. Hard drives have made programmers into dolts. Programs used to have to be simple, efficient, elegant. Today, they bare shiat: "Buy a bigger hard drive." I still have some DOS programs on 5 1/4 discs (RBase - DBase was shiat) that I use.

Bartender - I'll pay for his drink. And another one.
 
2012-11-17 04:04:27 AM  

crabsno termites: thank you, sir. Hard drives have made programmers into dolts. Programs used to have to be simple, efficient, elegant. Today, they bare shiat: "Buy a bigger hard drive." I still have some DOS programs on 5 1/4 discs (RBase - DBase was shiat) that I use.


True, but I'm going to play devil's advocate here for a minute.

Many DOS programs were developed in assembly language. While the language tends to result in compact code, it comes at the cost of significant complexity. It is very, very tedious to use assembly language, even on a clean orthogonal ISA like the MC68000. As you go down through ARM, Z80, MOS6502 and i8086, it goes from bad to worse.

You often cannot look at assembly source code and know what's going on in a huge program without reading the comments at the end of every line of code and the start of every section. A good developer probably has 2 characters worth of comments for every 1 character of code. A great developer ups that to 3:1. That takes time. And if the comments suck, you're going to be spending hours deciphering what the last dude who had your job was trying to do, praying that he used descriptive variable and label names.

As you start moving up through increasingly higher level languages, you're going to see code bloat. C is worse than ASM, but is much better than C++. All are more compact than intermediate-code languages like Java and C#. But you also start to see more safety checks. They're also easier to work with in a collaborative environment due to abstraction and compartmentalization. You also get to use more built-in generic functions/methods that you don't have to write from scratch anymore.

Also keep in mind that other things take more space. DOS used 16-bit pointers/segments and an interrupt jump table to call kernel functions. Windows now uses 64-bit pointers and calls kernel functions by name.

When you consider that developers are a fixed cost while hardware is constantly getting cheaper, you realize that higher level languages are the way to go, even if it results in larger binaries or applets.

Lastly, programs are much more complex these days. Look at what Mosaic could do versus the latest version of Firefox. The former could barely do about half of the text and grfx layout effects that a good word processor at the time could do. The latter comes with a massive 2D layout vector rendering engine, scripting engines, plugins, etc... More isn't always better, but just try to use NT4 with Office 95/7.0 in a VM. It might be fast, but it isn't pretty.
 
2012-11-17 04:26:22 AM  

mooseyfate: I have two auto-fills that made me want to commit suicide:

I was searching for how do I find something or another in Skyrim. I typed in "how do I" and the first auto fill suggestion was "How do I have sex with my sister". Another time, a work friend was looking up something about a light bulb and he typed in "why are there" and the first auto fill was "why are there ants crawling out of my butt". Wtf?

You know search completions are strongly influenced by your previous searches, right? You might want to think twice about telling everybody about those "crazy" Google auto-completions...
 
2012-11-17 05:16:18 AM  
Autofills disconnect you from the experience and reduce your MPG. Real computer users only use manualfill.

/Nipples/sauerkraut
 
2012-11-17 08:20:53 AM  

ringersol: xynix: "If someone can solve the KB problems on touch screens"

It seems everyone has largely given up and are trying to solve the text entry problem with cloud-driven voice conversion.
Which is great and all, except that it completely falls apart for composing anything more than small snippets of text, which is precisely where touch keyboards are such a problem in the first place.
(Not to mention dictation being innately undesirable in many situations.)

Which is to say: goddammitsomuch.

/ though I get more out of apps and a good browser than I do a good keyboard
// it'd still be nice to have a good keyboard
/// asetniop looks promising, but it's a 'tablet' solution at best; not really relevant to phones
//// and even then, likely a 10" tablet solution


"Cloud solutions" are frowned upon by many companies that are afraid of having company secrets stored on Google or Apple servers for ever.
 
2012-11-17 10:43:41 AM  

Flab: ringersol: xynix: "If someone can solve the KB problems on touch screens"

It seems everyone has largely given up and are trying to solve the text entry problem with cloud-driven voice conversion.
Which is great and all, except that it completely falls apart for composing anything more than small snippets of text, which is precisely where touch keyboards are such a problem in the first place.
(Not to mention dictation being innately undesirable in many situations.)

Which is to say: goddammitsomuch.

/ though I get more out of apps and a good browser than I do a good keyboard
// it'd still be nice to have a good keyboard
/// asetniop looks promising, but it's a 'tablet' solution at best; not really relevant to phones
//// and even then, likely a 10" tablet solution

"Cloud solutions" are frowned upon by many companies that are afraid of having company secrets stored on Google or Apple servers for ever.


i thought cloud was just a generic term meaning server. not Google server or Apple server, but generic server.

but since storage space can be continually upgraded, cause it's cheap. it's a cloud instead of a "server"
 
2012-11-17 01:03:13 PM  

Dinjiin: crabsno termites: thank you, sir. Hard drives have made programmers into dolts. Programs used to have to be simple, efficient, elegant. Today, they bare shiat: "Buy a bigger hard drive." I still have some DOS programs on 5 1/4 discs (RBase - DBase was shiat) that I use.
True, but I'm going to play devil's advocate here for a minute.

Your comments are, of course, correct. I remember from the 70's/80's going through volumes of code trying to decipher comments to figure out where the programmer was headed (sometimes even code I had myself written - ha!). My programming was limited to self-defense since our techies were part of the accounting department and my interest was in statistical analysis of very large amounts of data. Hence the Rbase/Dbase reference. Once I discovered Rbase and learned SQL, lost interest in writing - just whip out a new app for a different view of the data.

I guess my major objection to newer stuff is the sheer uselessness of most of it and the fact that the useless parts (useless as defined by the user) cannot be discarded. But, as you said, hardware is cheap, people are not.

/ 'cept some women, or at least that's what I'm told. Can't seem to be able to verify.
// Have a beer on me - I'll pay you back.

 
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