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(Short List)   New world's strongest metal can hold the weight of 3 apples. Let's read that again   (shortlist.com) divider line 18
    More: Fail, metals, lattices, HRL Laboratories  
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2012-11-16 10:49:30 AM  
So it can hold a Smurf? Everyone knows Smurfs are three apples high.
 
2012-11-16 10:50:51 AM  
Old news is fun.

Plating a plastic you later dissolve is so old I'm surprised it's not turning up in middle school science class. It's not that hard.
 
2012-11-16 10:51:12 AM  
That's actually pretty damn impressive. The artical is pretty light on details though. I get the impression the the lattice structure is more important that the material used. Like the material is chosen simbly because it can be formed into the lattice shape using this technique. In which case it's too bad they couldn't create the same lattice out of steel or titanium.
 
2012-11-16 10:53:19 AM  
What was that "three apples" thing supposed to demonstrate? I mean, I could put three apples on a piece of paper, but that doesn't mean the paper is the strongest stuff on earth.
 
2012-11-16 10:53:50 AM  
Get back to me when they discover adamantium.
 
2012-11-16 10:57:39 AM  

texdent: Get back to me when they discover adamantium.


or transparent aluminum
 
2012-11-16 10:57:42 AM  

texdent: Get back to me when they discover adamantium.


First they need a pink tail from a Flan Princess.
 
2012-11-16 10:58:06 AM  

texdent: Get back to me when they discover adamantium.


www.sabotagetimes.com
 
2012-11-16 10:58:51 AM  

Arkanaut: What was that "three apples" thing supposed to demonstrate? I mean, I could put three apples on a piece of paper, but that doesn't mean the paper is the strongest stuff on earth.


Strength to weight ratio. The more weight a lighter material/structure can carry, the better the ratio. It's generally why a suspension bridge is better than a brick bridge.
 
2012-11-16 10:59:28 AM  

Rwa2play: texdent: Get back to me when they discover adamantium.

or transparent aluminum


http://www.ohgizmo.com/2012/05/09/did-you-know-that-transparent-alumi n um-exists/ 
(You'll have to remove the spaces in that URL yourself)
 
2012-11-16 10:59:56 AM  
Fail, Subby? This thing can hold over 500 times its weight.
 
2012-11-16 11:00:53 AM  

Rwa2play: texdent: Get back to me when they discover adamantium.

or transparent aluminum


Ask and ye shall receive
 
2012-11-16 11:05:00 AM  
Here's a video by Boeing that goes into a *little* more detail:

World's Lightest Material
 
2012-11-16 11:05:40 AM  
Subby is showing his lack of knowledge of materials science.
 
2012-11-16 11:14:49 AM  

the_innkeeper: Arkanaut: What was that "three apples" thing supposed to demonstrate? I mean, I could put three apples on a piece of paper, but that doesn't mean the paper is the strongest stuff on earth.

Strength to weight ratio. The more weight a lighter material/structure can carry, the better the ratio. It's generally why a suspension bridge is better than a brick bridge.


Is that typically measured by putting something on a hard surface and then piling stuff on top of it, like in the picture? I feel like you would want to either suspend weights from something made with the material, or make a bridge out of it between two hardpoints and then piling weights on top of it that way.
 
2012-11-16 11:19:56 AM  
Wake me up for plasteel and ceramite.
 
2012-11-16 11:26:18 AM  

Arkanaut: the_innkeeper: Arkanaut: What was that "three apples" thing supposed to demonstrate? I mean, I could put three apples on a piece of paper, but that doesn't mean the paper is the strongest stuff on earth.

Strength to weight ratio. The more weight a lighter material/structure can carry, the better the ratio. It's generally why a suspension bridge is better than a brick bridge.

Is that typically measured by putting something on a hard surface and then piling stuff on top of it, like in the picture? I feel like you would want to either suspend weights from something made with the material, or make a bridge out of it between two hardpoints and then piling weights on top of it that way.


Depends on how you are using it. Some materials are stronger in tension or in compression. You work to the material's strengths. If you can put the weight of three apples on that fine little latticework in the article, it looks to have a decent compression strength. if you were to put it on the two hardpoints and bridge it, the compression/tension dynamic would change, and we could see how it reacts in shearing where the structure is sitting on the edge of the hardpoints.
 
2012-11-16 12:00:31 PM  

the_innkeeper: Depends on how you are using it. Some materials are stronger in tension or in compression. You work to the material's strengths. If you can put the weight of three apples on that fine little latticework in the article, it looks to have a decent compression strength. if you were to put it on the two hardpoints and bridge it, the compression/tension dynamic would change, and we could see how it reacts in shearing where the structure is sitting on the edge of the hardpoints.


Given that you could predict the loading that the lattice would undergo you could alter the structure to fit the needs. For example make the top half of the material strong in compression and the bottom strong in tension to better deal with a bending load (from the bottom). This is very similar to the concept behind the design of the cross section in an I beam or a lifting hook. The only thing that has held this sort of technology back is costs of manufacturing.
 
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