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(CTV News)   Rescue workers use jaws of life to free nursing home resident whose head became lodged in his bed, only for him to die days later. Fark: There have been dozens of such incidents reported   (atlantic.ctvnews.ca) divider line 31
    More: Scary, Emergency medical services, home, incident report, Health Canada, bed  
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5155 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Nov 2012 at 2:57 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-16 12:45:00 AM  
and hundreds if not thousands that go unreported every year.
Nursing homes suck and should be banned.
 
2012-11-16 03:03:06 AM  
i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-11-16 03:10:23 AM  
When my dad was dying in a Kaiser hospital, I showed up to his room one time and found him halfway off his bed stuck in the side rail, and this was in their intensive care ward where there are more nurses around. I did some yelling that day.

/Kaiser. Best hospital for preventive medicine, the worst if you're terminal.
 
2012-11-16 03:27:40 AM  
Every year, over six billion elderly patients die from the jaws of life.
 
2012-11-16 03:31:39 AM  

Begoggle: "only for him to die days later"
Which had nothing to do with this incident


So the doctors should be taken at their word and the authorities shouldn't be wasting their time investigating the incident then?
 
2012-11-16 03:33:29 AM  

the_chief: Every year, over six billion elderly patients die from the jaws of life.


It was created to save lives, but it got a taste of human blood. Coming this Winter to ScyFy,
wendyquest.files.wordpress.com
The Jaws of Death!
 
2012-11-16 03:34:59 AM  
We're they so very scared? Any TFD threads submitted?
 
2012-11-16 03:37:29 AM  
Those beds could do with a redesign. 

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-11-16 03:37:57 AM  
OK, first of all: I'm quite sure that the actual entrapment in the bed was not in and of itself the "cause of death," in that being stuck in a bedrail was probably not sufficient to cause death.

HOWEVER, when one is 90 years old and in poor enough health that one is confined to a nursing home, ANY excessive trauma (such as being stuck in a bed rail sufficiently that a fire crew is needed to break out the jaws of life to extricate one from said bed rail) is probably enough shock to the system to result in his dying sooner rather than later. I mean, he could as easily have slipped going to the potty or fallen an extra two inches into his wheelchair and that extra shock might have done it. That wouldn't have "caused his death" either; but the additional shock to his aging body would have.

So the real questions here are: Why did a 90-year old man have bed rails that he could get stuck in, why wasn't he being watched closely enough that he couldn't be gotten free without having to call in a rescue squad, and how can this be prevented, since it seems to be happening more than once? Maybe, I dunno, frail elderly men shouldn't have bed "rails" at all, but panels that their heads (or arms or legs) can't get caught in regardless, or nurses who check on them more than every 15 minutes?
 
2012-11-16 03:43:03 AM  
I think I'm going to start carrying hemlock around for the time when I get so frail that a hospital bedrail can do me in.
/41
/So I have a year or 2 left, right?
 
2012-11-16 03:46:20 AM  
No big deal.This happens to Peyton Manning all the time.
 
2012-11-16 03:51:12 AM  

Mega Steve: the_chief: Every year, over six billion elderly patients die from the jaws of life.

It was created to save lives, but it got a taste of human blood. Coming this Winter to ScyFy,
[wendyquest.files.wordpress.com image 575x325]
The Jaws of Death!


Dear GOD don't give them any more bad ideas!
 
2012-11-16 04:36:01 AM  
I was promised Death Panels, not Death Rails.

Another promise broken, Obama!
=Smidge=
 
2012-11-16 05:32:03 AM  
This was a problem with kid's beds here for a while - lazy, cheap-ass designs that saved the manufacturer a few pennies a bed but killed kids. Gotta think of those shareholders, you know.

The law has tightened up the standards. You can even get convicted for selling a older non-compliant kid's bed or giving it away..even putting out in the trash that hasn't been broken up in case someone re-purposes it.

They obviously need to do the same for these beds in nursing homes.
 
2012-11-16 07:32:48 AM  

cretinbob: and hundreds if not thousands that go unreported every year.
Nursing homes suck and should be banned.


they do, I agree with you, but what else is there to do? I took care of my parents as long as I could, but sadly (very sadly, actually) not everyone is willing, or has the ability to do that. cull the herd? canwe do that?
 
2012-11-16 07:38:37 AM  

Gyrfalcon: OK, first of all: I'm quite sure that the actual entrapment in the bed was not in and of itself the "cause of death," in that being stuck in a bedrail was probably not sufficient to cause death.

HOWEVER, when one is 90 years old and in poor enough health that one is confined to a nursing home, ANY excessive trauma (such as being stuck in a bed rail sufficiently that a fire crew is needed to break out the jaws of life to extricate one from said bed rail) is probably enough shock to the system to result in his dying sooner rather than later. I mean, he could as easily have slipped going to the potty or fallen an extra two inches into his wheelchair and that extra shock might have done it. That wouldn't have "caused his death" either; but the additional shock to his aging body would have.

So the real questions here are: Why did a 90-year old man have bed rails that he could get stuck in, why wasn't he being watched closely enough that he couldn't be gotten free without having to call in a rescue squad, and how can this be prevented, since it seems to be happening more than once? Maybe, I dunno, frail elderly men shouldn't have bed "rails" at all, but panels that their heads (or arms or legs) can't get caught in regardless, or nurses who check on them more than every 15 minutes?


I work in a small hospital, and the reason they put those rails up, is so the patient can't try and walk to the bathroom, risking a broken bone, which often brings about death soon after in the elderly.

as for the small hospital I work in, we simply don't have the resources to check patients every 15. too much to do, not enough money or staff to fix the problems. it truly sucks.
 
2012-11-16 07:46:11 AM  
i26.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-16 07:56:34 AM  
FTA: Entrapment events also accounted for 65 per cent of all deaths that have been reported with the use of beds.



So... what are the other 35% of deaths reported from use of beds? Should we be banning beds?
 
2012-11-16 08:14:11 AM  

cretinbob: and hundreds if not thousands that go unreported every year.
Nursing homes suck and should be banned.


You're right. We should just stick grandma on an ice floe when we can't take care of her any more.
 
2012-11-16 08:19:37 AM  
Hospital beds cost about $15,000 for the basic models and go up (way up) from there for specialized ones such as the ones in burn units with special mattresses or for bariatric patients that need to hold 1000 (or more) pounds.

Changing out the side rails looks to be pretty easy.
 
2012-11-16 08:55:07 AM  

i_got_no_strings: So... what are the other 35% of deaths reported from use of beds? Should we be banning beds?


Everybody I know who has died used a bed on the DAY THAT THEY DIED.
 
2012-11-16 09:30:29 AM  

cretinbob: Nursing homes suck and should be banned.


Hey, you know, some of us have real assholes for parents.
 
2012-11-16 09:30:44 AM  
It would be inconvenient as all get out for staff, but it some cases it would probably be safer to put mattresses on the floor or, at least, bring the height of the bed way down like a toddlers' bed so that falls can do no injury. Well, it would be safer for the patient or resident. It would likely pop-up the risk of injury to health workers tremendously. It's hard enough to move a bedridden patient to, for instance, change the sheets as it is. Even if a way could be devised to protect the health of the staff, people in the western world would freak out about Granny sleeping on or near the floor. Never mind her increased safety and the fact that millions of people around the world essentially sleep on the floor the reaction would likely be "OMG, they got Granny sleeping on the floor like an abused dog! We're not gonna put up with this cr@p. Granny deserves better! Ya'll get Granny on a top bunk now; a top bunk, I tell ya."

One of my sisters used to work in a nursing home. She adored the residents, but confessed there were times when she would have like to have popped some of their visiting relatives with a sneaky shot of Thorazine.
 
2012-11-16 09:49:17 AM  

James F. Campbell: cretinbob: Nursing homes suck and should be banned.
Hey, you know, some of us have real assholes for parents.


Now James, you know better.

You don't put them in a nursing home--that implies that you're responsible for them. You just cut off all contact and make sure they can't get hold of you when that day comes.
 
2012-11-16 10:03:17 AM  
No Patton Oswald jokes? Shame, Fark.

/Death Bed The Bed that Eats People
 
2012-11-16 10:10:24 AM  

Lunaville: It would be inconvenient as all get out for staff, but it some cases it would probably be safer to put mattresses on the floor or, at least, bring the height of the bed way down like a toddlers' bed so that falls can do no injury. Well, it would be safer for the patient or resident. It would likely pop-up the risk of injury to health workers tremendously. It's hard enough to move a bedridden patient to, for instance, change the sheets as it is. Even if a way could be devised to protect the health of the staff, people in the western world would freak out about Granny sleeping on or near the floor. Never mind her increased safety and the fact that millions of people around the world essentially sleep on the floor the reaction would likely be "OMG, they got Granny sleeping on the floor like an abused dog! We're not gonna put up with this cr@p. Granny deserves better! Ya'll get Granny on a top bunk now; a top bunk, I tell ya."

One of my sisters used to work in a nursing home. She adored the residents, but confessed there were times when she would have like to have popped some of their visiting relatives with a sneaky shot of Thorazine.


So says one who has never changed a diaper or bathed a patient. There are low beds and "scoop" beds to keep people from falling out. Unfortunately if the patient is bedbound, giving care to a patient on mattress on the floor is not safe for the care staff or family. Try to give a bedbath to a patient six inches off the ground, it's freaking impossible. If the patient is able to transfer out of bed, it is very difficult to for them to transfer from a low bed to a wheelchair. If it is someone who needs an assisted device like a walker, forget about it, they wouldn't have the strength to get out of bed.
 
2012-11-16 10:17:41 AM  

Gyrfalcon: OK, first of all: I'm quite sure that the actual entrapment in the bed was not in and of itself the "cause of death," in that being stuck in a bedrail was probably not sufficient to cause death.

HOWEVER, when one is 90 years old and in poor enough health that one is confined to a nursing home, ANY excessive trauma (such as being stuck in a bed rail sufficiently that a fire crew is needed to break out the jaws of life to extricate one from said bed rail) is probably enough shock to the system to result in his dying sooner rather than later. I mean, he could as easily have slipped going to the potty or fallen an extra two inches into his wheelchair and that extra shock might have done it. That wouldn't have "caused his death" either; but the additional shock to his aging body would have.

So the real questions here are: Why did a 90-year old man have bed rails that he could get stuck in, why wasn't he being watched closely enough that he couldn't be gotten free without having to call in a rescue squad, and how can this be prevented, since it seems to be happening more than once? Maybe, I dunno, frail elderly men shouldn't have bed "rails" at all, but panels that their heads (or arms or legs) can't get caught in regardless, or nurses who check on them more than every 15 minutes?


img.medicalexpo.com

What you are describing is essentially a cage. People get pissed when you cage elderlies.
 
2012-11-16 10:20:32 AM  
Most nursing homes suck. There are good ones out there, but you'll never be able to afford to live in them.

The last code I worked at a nursing home, the guy had been dead so long he was already starting to rigor. In a facility with, ostensibly, medically trained people.
 
2012-11-16 12:50:55 PM  
i1136.photobucket.com

Can appreciate the situation.
 
2012-11-16 02:47:29 PM  
I'm kind of scared for when I get old and need to live in some kind of care facility.

Yes, I plan to live that long. I exercise a lot. I'm virtually guaranteed to live way beyond my time (assuming my wife doesn't "accidentally" kill me first).
 
2012-11-16 03:20:43 PM  
When mom or dad become too burdensome for you to handle there is not a lot of choice.

Until they make assisted suicide legal and you can help knock off the folks before they go to a nursing home and eat up all of your inheritance.
 
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