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(Epicurious)   Better late than never, it's this week's Fark Food discussion thread: Thanksgiving   (epicurious.com) divider line 198
    More: Interesting, Fark Food, Southern Thanksgiving, regions of the United States  
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1031 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Nov 2012 at 8:27 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-16 12:38:14 AM  
Cot a cranberry can, but the raw berries are cheap...maybe a can of biscuits, a couple sweet potatoes, a couple white potatoes, some stuffing...I like it all fresh.
 
2012-11-16 12:50:31 AM  
I'm excited about Thanksgiving. I get to try deep fried turkey for the first time.
 
2012-11-16 12:56:38 AM  
My mom and dad will be on a cruise ship in the Mediterranean for Thanksgiving, so I'm thinking I'll just have a non-stop hors d'oeuvres extravaganza all day while we watch parades and football instead of the customary turkey and fixings. My kid will be home from college for a few days--yay!
 
2012-11-16 12:58:49 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: I'm excited about Thanksgiving. I get to try deep fried turkey for the first time.


I've been underwhelmed when I've had it. And I'm a huge fan of fried chicken. Just eh.
 
2012-11-16 12:59:11 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: I'm excited about Thanksgiving. I get to try deep fried turkey for the first time.


It's really, really good. Trust me.
 
2012-11-16 01:09:05 AM  
My planned menu:
Italian Sausage Stuffing ("no in the bird"; I also squirt on the bird's face)
Brussels sprouts with bacon and mustard vinaigrette
Baked sweet potatoes with way too much brown sugar and butter and also marshmallows just in case there wasn't enough sugar (wife's childhood fave)
Green bean casserole (required, isn't it?)
Oh yeah: a turkey (maybe)

Next morning we fry the stuffing in approximately 4 lbs of butter and serve with fried eggs (over easy, of course).
 
2012-11-16 01:11:36 AM  
Eff that marshmallow crap, I'm going for the Holiday Magic Yams!

Holiday Magic Yams
Ingredients
1 (16 oz.) can of peaches
1 tablespoon of cornstarch
⅔ cup of brown sugar
1 (8 oz.) can of whole cranberry sauce
½ teaspoon of butter
½ teaspoon of cinnamon
2 (17 oz.) cans of yams, drained

Details
Serves: 8

Method
Drain peaches and reserve juice. Put cornstarch in ¼ cup of peach juice and set aside. Heat reserved peach juice and sugar, cranberry sauce, cinnamon and butter; when butter is melted add cornstarch, mix and cook, stir over medium until it thickens - put yams in dish, put peaches around yams. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.
 
2012-11-16 01:15:17 AM  

soosh: Bathia_Mapes: I'm excited about Thanksgiving. I get to try deep fried turkey for the first time.

I've been underwhelmed when I've had it. And I'm a huge fan of fried chicken. Just eh.


I'm willing to give it a try. My contribution to Thanksgiving dinner will be a homemade chocolate cake. It's so rich that adding frosting would be just too much.
 
2012-11-16 01:15:51 AM  

buckler: Bathia_Mapes: I'm excited about Thanksgiving. I get to try deep fried turkey for the first time.

It's really, really good. Trust me.


That's what I've been told.
 
2012-11-16 01:33:40 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: buckler: Bathia_Mapes: I'm excited about Thanksgiving. I get to try deep fried turkey for the first time.

It's really, really good. Trust me.

That's what I've been told.


If you're gonna have a hand in the preparation at all, don't skimp on the seasoning. A couple cups of a homemade cajun butter mixture injected literally everywhere you can find a place for it (on the turkey, that is) will not go amiss, and will be even better if you top it off by liberally dry rubbing with ... well, whatever sounds good to you. You don't need the store-bought mixes really. Last time I deep fried turkeys, we did a store-bought rub for one and I just threw a bunch of vaguely cajun-y spices together for the second and there turned out being very little difference in taste. I've never had brined turkey, which seems all the rage this year, so I can't compare. But I can tell you that the deep frying makes by far the best turkey I've ever had.
 
2012-11-16 02:05:01 AM  
Here in Oakland the circle and I are too lazy/busy to cook this year so we're picking up Thanksgiving dinner from all the immigrant eateries that don't close on Thanksgiving. We're looking at pork buns, carnitas, barbacoa, pekin duck, and lots of pies.

Original plan was to hit the dim sum restaurant next to Trader Vic's then get wasted at said Trader Vic's. We may have selected the inferior option.
 
2012-11-16 02:20:34 AM  

rufus1001: Bathia_Mapes: buckler: Bathia_Mapes: I'm excited about Thanksgiving. I get to try deep fried turkey for the first time.

It's really, really good. Trust me.

That's what I've been told.

If you're gonna have a hand in the preparation at all, don't skimp on the seasoning. A couple cups of a homemade cajun butter mixture injected literally everywhere you can find a place for it (on the turkey, that is) will not go amiss, and will be even better if you top it off by liberally dry rubbing with ... well, whatever sounds good to you. You don't need the store-bought mixes really. Last time I deep fried turkeys, we did a store-bought rub for one and I just threw a bunch of vaguely cajun-y spices together for the second and there turned out being very little difference in taste. I've never had brined turkey, which seems all the rage this year, so I can't compare. But I can tell you that the deep frying makes by far the best turkey I've ever had.


I won't be involved at all, except for the eating part. Our host (we're having Thanksgiving dinner at a friend's house) will be deep frying the turkey. This is his 6th Thanksgiving deep frying turkeys and he cooks them for Christmas too.
 
2012-11-16 02:22:56 AM  

Phins: I need help. Some of my guests are vegetarian and my veggie stuffing has been a little boring the past few years. Suggestions?

And is there anything I can do to liven up tofurkey?


I say take some sriracha and mix it with cranberry to use as condiment. Sriracha will go on ANYTHING, lol! One of the farkers earlier suggested adding spices such as Thyme to the stuffing and I agree: Thyme is one of the best spices out there!
 
2012-11-16 03:09:04 AM  
Why do you people ruin your stuffing/dressing with crap like oysters and crawfish?
 
2012-11-16 03:15:37 AM  

Pokey.Clyde: Why do you people ruin your stuffing/dressing with crap like oysters and crawfish?


Ruin? Hell, it makes it better!
 
2012-11-16 03:28:51 AM  

Pokey.Clyde: Why do you people ruin your stuffing/dressing with crap like oysters and crawfish?


It's a Southern thing. I chop them so fine they just add a creamy, briny touch. I've never had a complaint, and get a request every year.
 
2012-11-16 04:05:32 AM  

GBmanNC: I need to make a dessert this year, anyone have any good recipes that someone functionally retarded in the kitchen can do?


A few years ago, I made a Caramel Apple Pie and it went over pretty well. It may seem a bit difficult, but it was my first pie, and it turned out pretty tastey
 
2012-11-16 04:35:12 AM  

Pokey.Clyde: Why do you people ruin your stuffing/dressing with crap like oysters and crawfish?


Oysters don't belong in stuffing, but crawfish... mm.
 
2012-11-16 06:36:37 AM  
This may sound white trash but my mom buys sliced turkey at the deli, wraps them up in stuffing and pops them in the oven.

That's been our turkey since I first suggested it as a kid. None of us truly like turkey and my mom cooks everything else except that.

/everyone knocks it
//then they try it
 
2012-11-16 07:33:17 AM  
Man, glad I saw this thread, it reminded me to take the turkey out of the freezer. Fark, is there anything it can't do?
 
2012-11-16 08:11:03 AM  

Purelilac: buckler: Purelilac: buckler: i gotta see if I can find a way to make a teeny Thanksgiving meal just for myself that still provides me the chance of leftovers. The best bit.

A package of turkey legs, a box of stove- top with add-ins, a baked sweet potato, a can of cranberry sauce, a small tube of popinfresh rolls. You could go nuts and throw a can of cream of mushroom soup into a can of green beans. Throw it all in the oven as needed and eat for days.

I have to say it was a serious comment, but that I never expected a serious response. I do prefer white meat, though.

Then ask the deli person at the grocery store to cut you off a 1 lb slab of the roasted turkey breast there. Since youre so farking picky all of a sudden, you can buy a jar of turkey gravy while youre at it.


"Since youre so farming picky all of a sudden"

Bwahahaha! Just like home!
 
2012-11-16 08:48:53 AM  

soosh: last year I did Alton Brown's brined turkey and it was definitely the best turkey I've ever made in 25 years of making them.


I use a different brine, myself. It's simpler, yet very tasty:

About a half cup of unflavored (Canola or vegetable) oil
Thyme
Rosemary
Sage (I am reasonably certain it's sage. If anyone wants, I'll be happy to double check tonight, after work)
Bay leaves (about 1 per 10 pounds)
Salt
Pepper
Lemon zest (one whole lemon's worth. Save the lemon.)
One Onion cut into quarters
Two Celery stalks cut in half

Put the turkey in a large pot. Put everything on the turkey to taste, but it's going to be about one to two tablespoons of all the spices. Add water to cover the turkey. Let it sit for a couple of days.

To cook:

350 degrees. Cut the lemon in half and put it in the turkey. Add a new quartered onion and two new stalks of celery around the turkey. Add 1/4 cup of white wine. I like to add some of the brine water as well to help it stay moist. Cook the bird breast side down for 45 minutes. Then cook for 15 to 20 minutes a pound. The only problem with this method is that the bird doesn't get crispy brown, but the hot water helps to cook the little bit of fat off. If you want your bird to be brown, take it out of the brine for the last 45 minutes and kick the temp up to 450.

Gravy:

Cook the entrails in 2 tablespoons of butter until fully cooked.
throw away the organs and add 1/4 cup of flour
Add the juices from the turkey slowly

I am very critical of anything that I cook, and I am so satisfied with how all of this has worked out that I have no interest in experimenting for the next few years at least.
 
2012-11-16 08:53:50 AM  

buckler: Purelilac: buckler: i gotta see if I can find a way to make a teeny Thanksgiving meal just for myself that still provides me the chance of leftovers. The best bit.

A package of turkey legs, a box of stove- top with add-ins, a baked sweet potato, a can of cranberry sauce, a small tube of popinfresh rolls. You could go nuts and throw a can of cream of mushroom soup into a can of green beans. Throw it all in the oven as needed and eat for days.

I have to say it was a serious comment, but that I never expected a serious response. I do prefer white meat, though.


I'm going with a turkey roast (white and dark meat, but they have all-white too), gravy made from drippings and the packet that comes with the roast (pretty good), stuffing and mashed potatoes that I made previously and froze, brown-and-serve rolls (rare treat for me), the can-of-mushroom-soup-in-can-of-green-beans-with-bacon, and a pumpkin pie from the store with whipped cream for dessert.
 
2012-11-16 08:56:15 AM  
Best cranberry recipe I've ever tasted. This makes a ridiculous huge amount. I usually cut it in half.

Zehnder's cranberry relish

1 lb. apples
1 lb. cranberries
2 cups sugar
2 whole Navel oranges, peel on

1. Wash and core the apples, leaving the skin intact.
2. Freeze the cranberries solid.
3. In a food processor, add half frozen cranberries and half apples and turn to chop speed so that the pieces are about a 1/4" square.
4. Chop the entire pound of apples/ cranberries and place in large mixing bowl and add sugar. Chop the peel-on whole navel oranges to the same consistency and mix into the apples/ cranberries/ sugar.
5. Refrigerate and let set 1 hour before serving.
 
2012-11-16 09:01:27 AM  
I should have mentioned to turn the bird over after the first 45 minutes.
 
2012-11-16 09:02:30 AM  
going to my brother in law's for thanksgiving.

Of course, he and my wife does not get along.

I'm making America's Test Kitchen's "Bread Stuffing with sausage and Dried Cherries.

Two pounds of chicken wings can be substituted for the turkey wings. If using chicken wings, separate them into 2 sections (it's not necessary to separate the tips) and poke each segment 4 or 5 times. Also, increase the amount of broth to 3 cups, reduce the amount of butter to 2 tablespoons, and cook the stuffing for only 60 minutes (the wings should register over 175 degrees at the end of cooking). Use the meat from the cooked wings to make salad or soup.
Ingredients

* 2pounds hearty white sandwich bread (20 to 22 slices), cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 16 cups)
* 3pounds turkey wings, divided at joints (see photo) (see note)
* 2teaspoons vegetable oil
* 1pound bulk pork sausage
* 4tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, plus extra for baking dish
* 1 large onion, chopped fine (about 1 1/2 cups)
* 3 celery ribs, chopped fine (about 1 1/2 cups)
* 2teaspoons table salt
* 2tablespoons minced fresh thyme leaves
* 2tablespoons minced fresh sage leaves
* 1teaspoon ground black pepper
* 2 1/2cups low-sodium chicken broth
* 3 large eggs
* 1cup dried cherries
* 1cup pecan halves, toasted and chopped fine

Instructions

*

1. Adjust oven racks to upper-middle and lower-middle positions and heat oven to 250 degrees. Spread bread cubes in even layer on 2 rimmed baking sheets. Bake until edges have dried but centers are slightly moist (cubes should yield to pressure), 45 to 60 minutes, stirring several times during baking. (Bread can be toasted up to 1 day in advance.) Transfer to large bowl and increase oven temperature to 375 degrees.
*

2. Use tip of paring knife to poke 10 to 15 holes in each wing segment. Heat oil in 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat until it begins to shimmer. Add wings in single layer and cook until golden brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Flip wings and continue to cook until golden brown on second side, 4 to 6 minutes longer. Transfer wings to medium bowl and set aside.
*

3. Return skillet to medium-high heat and add sausage; cook, breaking sausage into ½-inch pieces with wooden spoon, until browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer sausage to paper towel-lined plate, leaving rendered fat in skillet.
*

4. Heat butter with rendered fat in skillet over medium heat. When foaming subsides, add onion, celery, and ½ teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are softened but not browned, 7 to 9 minutes. Add thyme, sage, and pepper; cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add 1 cup broth and bring to simmer, using wooden spoon to scrape browned bits from bottom of pan. Add vegetable mixture to bowl with dried bread and toss to combine.
*

5. Grease 13 by 9-inch baking dish with butter. In medium bowl, whisk eggs, remaining 1½ cups broth, remaining 1½ teaspoons salt, and any accumulated juices from wings until combined. Add egg/broth mixture, cherries, pecans, and sausage to bread mixture and gently toss to combine; transfer to greased baking dish. Arrange wings on top of stuffing, cover tightly with aluminum foil, and place baking dish on rimmed baking sheet.
*

6. Bake on lower-middle rack until thickest part of wings registers 175 degrees on instant-read thermometer, 60 to 75 minutes. Remove foil and transfer wings to dinner plate to reserve for another use. Using fork, gently fluff stuffing. Let rest 5 minutes before serving. 

Using turkey wings to make the stuffing moist is a great idea.
 
2012-11-16 09:04:51 AM  

NobleHam: Senator Russell Sweet Potatoes:



3 cups mashed sweet potatoes
3/4 cup sugar
2 eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/2 stick butter
1 tsp vanilla

Mix and place in buttered dish. Bake 15 minutes at 350.

Heat:
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup flour
1/3 cup butter
1 cup chopped pecans

Spread over sweet potato mixture. bake at 350 for 30 minutes or longer. Serves 6 light eaters. I'd double it.

You can thank me later.


I've been making this exact same recipe for over 20 years and as far as my family is concerned, if I don't bring the sweet potatoes, it's not Thanksgiving.

//doubling the milk makes it too runny.
 
2012-11-16 09:42:15 AM  
Second edit:

Also cook a quarter of a finely chopped onion with the entrails of the turkey.
 
2012-11-16 10:31:04 AM  
I want to get a fresh (rather than frozen) turkey this year. My instincts say the fresh will be not as fresh, as I would suspect the frozen ones are frozen right after they are killed. Any input in appreciated.
 
2012-11-16 11:03:43 AM  

sandi_fish: I want to get a fresh (rather than frozen) turkey this year. My instincts say the fresh will be not as fresh, as I would suspect the frozen ones are frozen right after they are killed. Any input in appreciated.


There can be a difference in taste but it's not because they're frozen or fresh.It's because of what they have been eating. So if you get a fresh bird from a reputable place it will have a good flavor. I don't know what is like where you are but around here you have to order a fresh bird well in advance of the holiday and then pick it up when you need it. It's almost impossible to just walk in a get a fresh bird at this time of year.
 
2012-11-16 11:23:15 AM  

gremlin1: st walk in a g


Thanks, I meant fresh, as in not frozen yet. I will ask my grocer which is better. I might just stick with what I know.....
 
2012-11-16 11:52:02 AM  
My mother and I make the Thanksgiving meal for about 20 or so family members. We always make several dished that nobody else but us (and oddly, a 6-year-old niece) likes: Oyster dressing, Giblet gravy, Mincemeat pie and others. We eat like kings and everybody else gets basic turkey and green bean casserole. Hah!
 
2012-11-16 12:23:31 PM  

SkerriNinja: I've got 2 bags of whole cranberries. Anyone have a good recipe other than sauce? I'd like to try something new.


My sister makes baked breadcube stuffing with whole cranberries in it. Yum.

The other thing I really like is french cut green beans simmered with a few slices of BACON.
 
2012-11-16 12:56:04 PM  
We've been deep frying our Thanksgiving turkeys for 5 or 6 years now and started brining them after the first or second year we switched to frying. It truly makes all the difference in the world! They turn out way more moist and like other farkers have said do not be afraid of seasoning!
 
2012-11-16 01:06:05 PM  

luckcat: GBmanNC: I need to make a dessert this year, anyone have any good recipes that someone functionally retarded in the kitchen can do?

Vanilla Poached Pears

Ingredients
1 (750-ml) bottle white wine, Riesling or Viognier
1 cup water
5 ounces vanilla sugar, approximately 3/4 cup
1 whole vanilla bean, split and scraped
4 firm Bartlett, Anjou or Bosc pears, peeled leaving the stem intact
Directions
Place the white wine, water, sugar and vanilla bean and pulp into a 4-quart saucepan over medium-high heat and bring to a boil.

Core the pears from the bottom. Decrease the heat to medium low and place the pears into the liquid, cover and cook for 30 minutes or until the pears are tender but not falling apart. Maintain a gentle simmer. Remove the pears to a serving dish, standing them upright, and place in the refrigerator.

Remove the vanilla bean from the saucepan, increase the heat to high and reduce the syrup to approximately 1 cup of liquid, approximately 20 to 25 minutes. Do not allow the syrup to turn brown. Place the syrup in a heatproof container and place in the refrigerator until cool, approximately 1 hour.

Remove the pears from the refrigerator, spoon the sauce over the pears and serve.

I don't core the pears, and generally sprinkle with cardamom, serve with creme anglaise or whipped cream, and gingersnaps.

[sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net image 612x612]


Oh I'm making that. Thank you.
 
2012-11-16 02:03:21 PM  

bmfderek: Self Defecating Humor: I've been doing AB's brined turkey for a few years now, but I'm thinking of doing a smoked turkey this year. The gravy will be a bit of a challenge, but I think a few extra parts should be good for a stock.

Like I posted above, brine the bird, and smoke it also. Catch the drippings with an aluminum pan-the gravy is great.


I don't know about the brining. In all honesty, I've never brined a bird (never needed to). Never failed to have a juicy bird the way we smoke it.

Just never understood the compulsion to saturate meat with salt. But then, different strokes for different folks.
 
2012-11-16 02:15:28 PM  

gingerjet: Making a cornish hen, drinking whiskey, and playing Halo.

/first week in four months that I finally have a few days to myself


Who are you and what are you doing here?!

/Had that down to 'whiskey'. I only have rum...
 
2012-11-16 02:29:21 PM  
My Brine:

Same as AB's but I add a few stems of Green onion, a whole orange halved and squeezed, a whole lemon halved and squeezed, Fresh whole sprigs of sage and rosemary, and a few whole cloves.

When I cook the turkey, in the cavity I throw a few stems of green onion, a half an orange, half a lemon, sprigs of fresh sage and rosemary.
 
2012-11-16 07:11:42 PM  

themeaningoflifeisnot: Day after Thanksgiving turkey and bleu cheese sandwiches.



That sounds good. Do you use salad dressing or actual cheese?
 
2012-11-16 10:27:16 PM  
Being a college student with grad school applications to work on/seriously sadistic professors, I got to plead out of the annual trek to BFE Wyoming where the yearly "who's better at being passive-aggressive" competition takes place. While I'm going to be swamped with homework, at least I'm well out of the blast radius of my mom and her mom, who get along like wet cats in a sack, as well as my grandma's rat from hell Chihuaha. I'm having Thanksgiving with my partners, thegreenintern and Mrs. Intern, and I've volunteered to cook, too (though having been raised in a family where food = love and also competition, I feel like this is a shamefully sparse spread)

1. Turkey drumsticks (none of us like white meat, so fark it - we'll roast drumsticks in the oven)
2. Stuffing with mushrooms and water chestnuts
3. Pecan pie.
4. Proper cranberry sauce (as in, can still see the can rings)
5. Beer - nice, good beer.
6. Pumpkin bread (the kind that has had several authors rejoice in ecstasy when I bring it to cons)

\I will miss the yearly fight over which cranberry sauce is best
\\ Will not miss spending hours cooking/washing dishes while the men lounged
 
2012-11-17 05:57:41 AM  

bmfderek: Self Defecating Humor: I've been doing AB's brined turkey for a few years now, but I'm thinking of doing a smoked turkey this year. The gravy will be a bit of a challenge, but I think a few extra parts should be good for a stock.

Like I posted above, brine the bird, and smoke it also. Catch the drippings with an aluminum pan-the gravy is great.


Last year was the first year I ever cooked a turkey. My MIL had to take a last minute trip so I did the AB recipe and everyone said it was the best they ever had. I did also started with a better bird than the usually butterball or store brand so that helped too. I ordered a pasture raised heritage this year. It's probably still walking around right now. Anyway I was thinking about smoking it but was concerned about it drying out, even with the brine. Any suggestions? My first thought was to start it in the 500 degree oven alla AB and moving it to the smoker.
 
2012-11-17 09:10:28 AM  

gremlin1: Thanksgiving dinner with my family

waldorf salad
turkey
stuffing
green bean casserole
sweet potatoes in butter, brown sugar and orange juice
mashed potatoes
lots of gravy
cranberry goop from a can
pumpkin pie (cuz you have to)
cherry pie (cuz I like it)
homemade ice cream 

Followed by a nap


Please people, start making fresh cranberry sauce. The difficulty level is about the same as boiling eggs. It's just water, sugar, and cranberries. You add the cranberries, water, and sugar to a pan, bring it to a boil, reduce the heat a little bit, and then let it cook for a few minutes until the cranberries start popping open. After it cools a bit I add a can of drained mandarin oranges and it's farking delicious. People think you know voodoo or some shiat if you make this. I have no idea why since it's the easiest part to make of the whole meal. I always make it the day before since it just improves the longer you let it sit together.
 
2012-11-17 09:21:45 AM  

SkerriNinja: I've got 2 bags of whole cranberries. Anyone have a good recipe other than sauce? I'd like to try something new.

Also, I always make crab dip for an appetizer. It generally keeps people from picking at the turkey and satiates my husband's Old Bay fix.


You can add some allspice or cinnamon, saute some diced apple with butter and brown sugar and add that at the end, add some toasted walnuts or orange zest, etc.

Pretty much anything that sounds good to you will work.
 
2012-11-17 09:40:35 AM  

NobleHam: Senator Russell Sweet Potatoes:

[content0.tastebook.com image 480x320]

3 cups mashed sweet potatoes
3/4 cup sugar
2 eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/2 stick butter
1 tsp vanilla

Mix and place in buttered dish. Bake 15 minutes at 350.

Heat:
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup flour
1/3 cup butter
1 cup chopped pecans

Spread over sweet potato mixture. bake at 350 for 30 minutes or longer. Serves 6 light eaters. I'd double it.

You can thank me later.


That sounds really delicious.

For anyone looking for a sweet potato dish with a spicy spin try out this recipe-

I have made it several times and it IS really excellent.

Spicy Roasted Sweet Potatoes With Orange & Honey By evelyn/athens

Cook Time:
1 hrs 5 mins
55 mins

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, more for the pan
3 tablespoons honey
1/4 cup orange juice
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
1/4 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika (regular is fine if you don't have smoked)
4 medium sweet potatoes, preferably the same size and shape, peeled, halved crosswise, and quartered lengthwise (2 lb. total)
kosher salt fresh ground black pepper Directions:
1
Heat the oven to 400°F Lightly butter a large Pyrex or ceramic baking dish that can hold the sweet potato wedges in one layer.
2
In a small saucepan, melt the butter. Whisk in the honey, orange juice, and spices. Put the sweet potatoes in the buttered baking dish, add the honey mixture, and toss the pieces well to coat them thoroughly. Arrange the sweet potatoes in a single layer; sprinkle with salt and pepper.
3
Roast until the potatoes are browned and tender and the juices are bubbly and thickened, 45 to 55 minutes. To ensure even roasting, stir and baste several times with the pan juices, doing so more frequently toward the end of roasting. Serve at once.

I can't recommend this recipe enough. It is absolutely spectacular.
 
2012-11-17 10:19:33 AM  

Mr.Poops: Best mashed potato recipe ever:

5 Pound bag of potatoes
1 stick Unsalted Butter
1 pint Heavy Cream
1 clove fresh garlic, finely minced
Fresh ground black pepper
Sea Salt

Put your fully peeled potatoes in a large stock pot, fill with water. Put a GENEROUS palm ful of salt in the water. Boil until finished. Melt your butter on a stove pan or in the microwave, whisk in cream. Pour cream mixture over drained potatoes, mash. Add your minced garlic, add pepper or more salt if desired.


I also roast an entire head of garlic in the oven while the turkey is cooking. Peel most of the "paper" off of the garlic, set it in the middle of a 10"X10" piece of foil, drizzle it with olive oil and roll the foil up into a ball, and then roast it for about 30-45 minutes. You'll know when it's done because the aroma of roasted garlic will start to permeate the entire house (yummy smell, not bad smell). Take it out of the oven and let it cool for a few minutes and then the roasted garlic will squeeze out of each clove very easily. I mash the roasted garlic into the mashed potatoes and it is wicked delicious.
 
2012-11-17 10:28:03 AM  

WhoopAssWayne: Just remember atheist liberal scum, Thanksgiving is fundamentally a religious holiday. You are giving thanks to God - that's the point. Best for you pre-adults going through your atheist liberal stage to avoid it altogether.

President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of "Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens," - wikipedia


Fark off you jack@ss.
 
2012-11-17 11:22:49 PM  
Aussie version of your Thanksgiving dishes

Roast leg of lamb with rosemary and garlic
BBQ King prawns with chili sauce

Mashed potato with butter, milk salt and pepper
Steamed green beans with a sprinkle of salt and pepper
Mashed sweet potato with salt and farking pepper ( no farking sugar it's not bloody dessert yet )
Cranberry sauce made in a bloody saucepan not from a can, and still tart not sweet!
Gravy made in the dish
Green garden salad with lettuce, rocket, tomatoes, capsicum and onion
Mantova bread rolls ( little rolls with a twist )

Pavlova with passion fruit and strawberries
Ice cream, cream and apple pie
 
2012-11-18 09:28:42 AM  
White Castle Turkey Stuffing

10 White Castle hamburgers, no pickles
1 1/2 cups celery, diced
1 1/4 tsp. ground thyme
1 1/2 tsp. ground sage
3/4 tsp. coarsely ground black pepper
1/4 cup chicken broth

In a large mixing bowl, tear the burgers into pieces and add diced celery and seasonings. Toss and add chicken broth. Toss well. Stuff cavity of turkey just before roasting.

Makes about 9 cups (enough for a 10- to 12-pound turkey). Note: Allow 1 hamburger for each pound of turkey, which will be the equivalent of 3/4 cup of stuffing per pound.
 
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