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(SF Weekly)   I used to be way into soup before it got cool. I kept burning my tongue but it was so worth it   (blogs.sfweekly.com) divider line 74
    More: Asinine, brand recognition, Campbell's Soup, SF Weekly, soups, time constraint, taste  
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6046 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Nov 2012 at 5:53 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-15 07:50:41 PM

doloresonthedottedline: Or why it was in a bag.


Sounds like a Canadian thing. I hope Canada is rubbing off on the hipsters. The next think you know, they'll be wearing plaid and growing beards.
 
2012-11-15 08:09:50 PM

DarkPascual: Being born and raised in the Ecuador, the concept with quinua soup is nothing new to me...

But next time, it's beef instead of chicken, you damn philistines...


I hated Ecuadorian soup. All watery and stuff with random meat and bones floating around. I guess getting the cheap almuerzo deals wasn't so great. I do miss a good churrasco though, beaten up meat and all. And some aji.
 
2012-11-15 08:29:53 PM
 
2012-11-15 08:40:43 PM

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Thraeryn: The image with quinoa and poblano chilés made me laugh so farking hard. You couldn't find a more hipster soup if it was produced in conjunction with Trader Joe's.

I love good soup. In my experience, no good soup is made by a company. It's made by you and whatever friends you can rope into cutting the ingredients.

It's because the secret ingredient in every mass-produced soup is the same: SALT. It has to be, to meet the required shelf life. You can't make a soup with a shelf life of more than one week without loading it with salt.



No, the canning/bagging process gives it the shelf life. The salt is just there to cover up the blandness or lack of fresh flavor. Salt's the cheapest seasoning.
 
2012-11-15 08:52:49 PM

TheDirtyNacho: No, the canning/bagging process gives it the shelf life. The salt is just there to cover up the blandness or lack of fresh flavor. Salt's the cheapest seasoning.


I would imagine canned soup is homogenized, right?
 
2012-11-15 09:03:12 PM
Damn....now I want soup.
 
2012-11-15 09:05:02 PM

tweek46420: why did the hipster burn his tongue on his coffee

he drank it before it was cool


Thank you for making the headline make sense.

I'm apparently slow tonight.

Also, I thought the article was funny and probably true. After learning that my husband will cook soup on demand, I haven't had canned soup for years. The couple of times I tried it, it tasted... off.
 
2012-11-15 09:19:05 PM

mcwehrle: I just saw these last week while grocery getting. I thought "how odd".

Progresso FTW.


Progresso adds so much thickener that you are eating paste when it should be liquid. I still buy it when it is on sale for $1 a can because that's a pretty good deal for paste.
 
2012-11-15 09:21:12 PM

mikefinch: The bags of soup look pretty gross though. I hate pouring soup out of a bag. It just isn't an activity that encourages an appetite.


Same here. I love soup, but pouring it out of a bag just seems...unhygienic somehow.
 
2012-11-15 09:26:29 PM
..for the Millennial generation, which has tragically stopped buying canned soup.

I've read enough
 
2012-11-15 09:38:52 PM

uber humper: TheDirtyNacho: No, the canning/bagging process gives it the shelf life. The salt is just there to cover up the blandness or lack of fresh flavor. Salt's the cheapest seasoning.

I would imagine canned soup is homogenized, right?



You're thinking of pasteurized. Homogenized is what milk often has done to it so as to evenly distribute the fat throughout and not collect all at the top. But yes, pasteurization is one method used in canning. The heating process can affect flavor, so salt is often added to enhance it. Common, but not critical as there are plenty of low sodium canned goods out there.

Salt can be antimicrobial, but usually only if whatever it is you're preserving is dried out (ie, meat). Many pathogens can easily grow in salty moisture which soup certainly is.
 
2012-11-15 09:45:53 PM
I don't eat soup very often because it's just not that filling most of the time, but I do enjoy many of the Campbell's standards especially for cooking OTHER things (cream of mushroom, chicken, broccoli - handy things to have around). I've never really liked other companies that I've tried, but it might just be my general lack of attraction to soup.

The bags seem pretty stupid though; for one thing they're probably impossible to stack in your cupboard, and if I'm going to eat soup at all, I want a bowl and a spoon, period.

I guess I'm just getting old.
 
2012-11-15 10:33:07 PM

ladyfortuna: I don't eat soup very often because it's just not that filling most of the time, but I do enjoy many of the Campbell's standards especially for cooking OTHER things (cream of mushroom, chicken, broccoli - handy things to have around). I've never really liked other companies that I've tried, but it might just be my general lack of attraction to soup.

The bags seem pretty stupid though; for one thing they're probably impossible to stack in your cupboard, and if I'm going to eat soup at all, I want a bowl and a spoon, period.

I guess I'm just getting old.



I've had one of these and the bag is terrible. You're right; you can't stack them. They take up more room than cans in general. Once opened, the bag is very flimsy and 'springy', is the best way to describe it. Basically, it tends to crease and dent then suddenly pop back into place and fling soup all over you.

Never tried eating straight out of the bag. Seems like something a dog would do.
 
2012-11-15 10:35:20 PM

revrendjim: mcwehrle: I just saw these last week while grocery getting. I thought "how odd".

Progresso FTW.

Progresso adds so much thickener that you are eating paste when it should be liquid. I still buy it when it is on sale for $1 a can because that's a pretty good deal for paste.


I don't remember if it's Progresso but one of the companies produces an "old-fashioned" line of soup that does not taste as though they added chewy amoeba. Avoid the "rich and hearty!" lines, since that is made with the aforementioned amoeba.
 
2012-11-15 10:36:05 PM
Headline.
Lols.
Plus ones.
All that.
 
2012-11-15 11:28:01 PM

TheDirtyNacho: ou're thinking of pasteurized. Homogenized is what milk often has done to it so as to evenly distribute the fat throughout and not collect all at the top. But yes, pasteurization is one method used in canning


Thanks for straightening me out. If someone ever asks where I learned about homogenization and pasteurization, I'll say "a dirty nacho!"
 
2012-11-16 12:20:17 AM
Campbell's is alright if you like salt.
 
2012-11-16 12:21:09 AM

ChadM89: Soup isn't hard by any objective measure.

Roasted red pepper with smoked gouda? Here's how I'd do it, just off the top of my head:

Get a pot hot, squirt some oil in. Throw in some mirepoix, cook for a couple minutes. Throw in some roasted red bell peppers (you can do this yourself or, even easier, get jarred or canned ones which are just fine). Deglaze with some white wine, reduce that almost nothing, pour in a bunch of vegetable stock and throw a bay leaf in there along with some other fresh herb like thyme or basil. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, let it go about 20 minutes. Pull the bay leaf out, then hit the soup with an immersion blender. Once you've smoothed it out, throw in some cream and let it simmer another couple minutes. While it's doing that, chop some smoked gouda cheese. Take the soup off the heat, add the cheese, stir until it's melted. Salt to taste, and hit it with a little black pepper.

Easy peasy, lemon squeezy.


Yeah but where that takes time (couple hours for right away, to a few days for it to be really good soup), equipment (immersion blender? not in most people's personal kitchens) and money (smoked gouda $5 a block if not more depending on your region, red peppers $2 lb or jars at $3 white wine $11 at least, vegetable stock $2-3, spices and herbs,$5-25 depending on how much variety), I can get a bag of delicious, already made red pepper and smoked gouda, for 3 minutes in the microwave and $1,48
 
2012-11-16 12:47:52 AM
So, are my generation making our own as I do, or do we just not like Campbell's since they got rid of the only one I've always loved? (Alphabet with tomato and beef broth, since it was deemed unhealthy. The heathens!)
 
2012-11-16 03:31:22 AM
(immersion blender? not in most people's personal kitchens)

Essential if you like making soup from scratch. I make and freeze batches on the weekends, Broccoli cheese, chicken, butternut squash, Tom kha gai, lots more. I've seen immersion blenders in Goodwill for just a few bucks. I make my own stock in a pressure cooker too. Really rewarding (and inexpensive) to make delicious soup using fresh ingredients, and you know exactly what you are eating.
 
2012-11-16 11:59:22 AM
as a millennial that still buys soup, I think these new flavors look delicious....
 
2012-11-16 01:18:54 PM
Now that hipsterism has gone mainstream, we should be seeing this demographic vanish from the radar.

About ten years late, but better late than never.
 
2012-11-16 01:31:35 PM

Flragnararch: Yeah but where that takes time (couple hours for right away, to a few days for it to be really good soup), equipment (immersion blender? not in most people's personal kitchens) and money (smoked gouda $5 a block if not more depending on your region, red peppers $2 lb or jars at $3 white wine $11 at least, vegetable stock $2-3, spices and herbs,$5-25 depending on how much variety), I can get a bag of delicious, already made red pepper and smoked gouda, for 3 minutes in the microwave and $1,48


If you are into cooking at all, you really should get an immersion blender. They're inexpensive and while you won't need to use it all that often, when you DO need to use it, it's the perfect tool for the job. You can use a blender to do soups but it's messy and you have to work in batches usually and it's just an all-around pain in the ass.

As far as time goes, no. Not two hours to make that soup the way I described. My total time including prep would probably be in the 30-minute range. I'm a former professional chef so I'll grant that my knife skills and organization tend to speed me up compared to the average home cook, but there's no reason anyone should need more than 45 minutes to make it. And yes, it costs more to buy the ingredients. But you don't use all of the ingredients just on the soup. Now you'll have them to make other things with also, and you're probably going to make at least 3 or 4 servings of the soup even if you're just making it for one, so the cost doesn't compare directly to a single-serving can/bag. Also you don't buy 11-dollar wine to cook with. If you have decent wine at home to drink you just use a splash of that. If you're buying wine just to cook with, the 4-dollar stuff works just fine.
 
2012-11-16 09:56:04 PM

ChadM89: Flragnararch: Yeah but where that takes time (couple hours for right away, to a few days for it to be really good soup), equipment (immersion blender? not in most people's personal kitchens) and money (smoked gouda $5 a block if not more depending on your region, red peppers $2 lb or jars at $3 white wine $11 at least, vegetable stock $2-3, spices and herbs,$5-25 depending on how much variety), I can get a bag of delicious, already made red pepper and smoked gouda, for 3 minutes in the microwave and $1,48

If you are into cooking at all, you really should get an immersion blender. They're inexpensive and while you won't need to use it all that often, when you DO need to use it, it's the perfect tool for the job. You can use a blender to do soups but it's messy and you have to work in batches usually and it's just an all-around pain in the ass.

As far as time goes, no. Not two hours to make that soup the way I described. My total time including prep would probably be in the 30-minute range. I'm a former professional chef so I'll grant that my knife skills and organization tend to speed me up compared to the average home cook, but there's no reason anyone should need more than 45 minutes to make it. And yes, it costs more to buy the ingredients. But you don't use all of the ingredients just on the soup. Now you'll have them to make other things with also, and you're probably going to make at least 3 or 4 servings of the soup even if you're just making it for one, so the cost doesn't compare directly to a single-serving can/bag. Also you don't buy 11-dollar wine to cook with. If you have decent wine at home to drink you just use a splash of that. If you're buying wine just to cook with, the 4-dollar stuff works just fine.


Well now I want one, and your recipes :D
 
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