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(Yahoo)   The shirtless FBI agent in the Petraeus clusterfark has been outed   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 13
    More: Followup, Petraeus, FBI, Joint Terrorism Task Force, FBI Director Robert Mueller, House Majority Leader, Eric Cantor, cia director  
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9485 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Nov 2012 at 9:34 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-15 11:37:12 AM  
2 votes:
Lots of People: We already know about the affair, so we don't have to worry about blackmail, so he should be able to keep his job.

Not true. For all we know, Petraeus has had dozens of affairs, it's just that (until now) he's only been sleeping with sane people. But even if Broadwell was his only paramour, he still can't be the head of the CIA anymore.

The fact that Petraeus is vulnerable to the attention of a young female admirer is exactly the sort of weakness intelligence officers look for when they're trying to acquire assets. You have to add to that the fact that he was perfectly fine with violating a solemn vow until he got caught, and that he intended to keep his prestigious and high-paying job... until he got caught. He was also deeply involved with a group of people who had everything to gain by exposing classified and personal information in exchange for money, privileges and inside access*. You don't have to be a psychologist to understand why foreign intelligence agencies would be interested in a guy like that. And now his weaknesses and vulnerabilities are extremely public; they don't even have to work to figure him out.

This is how you turn someone against their country. You find what their problems are and promise you can fix them. There are bonus points if you can make their problems worse. Petraeus can't be the head of the CIA for the same reason you wouldn't want an addict or someone with severe financial problems to be head of the CIA. It's not the moral violations that are a problem. It's the vulnerability this scandal has exposed. And the best way to solve it is to get that guy (and his con artist friends) away from classified information.

I'm not saying Petraeus is a bad person or that his public service wasn't valuable. But once you do something once it's easy to do it again, and next time it might not be with someone who has a security clearance.

*Speaking of inside access, what does one have to do to be come an "honorary consul" of a foreign country? Why would the government of South Korea lead that person to believe they had "diplomatic inviolability?" Do you really think it's an accident that someone who holds fancy parties for top military brass is also helping South Korean nationals make "trade" and "cultural" connections in the U.S.?
2012-11-15 10:13:39 AM  
2 votes:

chuckufarlie: Can somebody explain to me how any of this is important? why should Petraeus resign for having sex with a woman that was not his wife? If everybody inside the beltway was held up to that standard, they would all have to resign. They only person that should be pissed is his wife.


Lets say I'm a Chinese spy:

Listen up Davey boy, if you don't let me in on insert sensitive national security secret here, I'll expose your affair and ruin your personal and professional life.

Does that about sum it up?
2012-11-15 09:51:23 AM  
2 votes:
crooksandliars.com
2012-11-15 06:37:28 PM  
1 votes:
Here it is!

seattletimes.com

in case my sub goes red
2012-11-15 11:23:51 AM  
1 votes:
Looking through the coverage of this 'scandal' it amazed me the lengths that grown-ass men will go to in response to some fawning attention from an attractive woman. Tell me that you don't look at the picture of 'shaved my head to conceal my receding hairline' agent next to the picture of 'socialite with fake boobs' and think that here's a guy trying to impress a woman that has always been out of his league. Same deal with Allen and Petraeus (though at least Petraeus got his knob polished) - it all just smacks of trying to impress women way to young for them by talking about all their power and confidential knowledge.

It shouldn't surprise me - I'm sure I'd respond in the same way if I hadn't taken the precaution of having zero power or influence over anything of importance.
2012-11-15 11:19:03 AM  
1 votes:
I particularly like the San Francisco Chronicle's take on this:

All Americans who regard privacy as a fundamental right should be unnerved by the breadth and the detail of a search through personal correspondence in the scandal that brought down CIA Director David Petraeus.

For a moment, put aside the question of whether Petraeus and Gen. John Allen, the top NATO commander in Afghanistan, showed seriously poor judgment in their dealings with two women. The evidence to date suggests they did.

Still, the seemingly unfettered ability of federal investigators to expand a search that began with socialite Jill Kelley complaining to an FBI friend about online harassment shows the extent to which our Fourth Amendment protection against "unreasonable search and seizure" has been obliterated in the post-9/11 expansion of government surveillance. Kelley's grievance might have fallen on deaf ears if it had gone to someone other than an FBI agent who was out to impress her - as suggested by the shirtless photos he sent her.

The ability of government agents to conduct intrusive domestic surveillance in the absence of evidence of a crime is something many Americans assumed was forbidden by the reforms that followed the reign of J. Edgar Hoover, who used the tools at his disposal to mine embarrassing personal details about his enemies, real and perceived.

The extent of modern government surveillance is underscored by the numbers: requests for personal information on 34,000 Google accounts; the 1.7 billion e-mails, phone calls and other communications intercepted and stored each day by the National Security Agency.

These tools can be used for good (tracking terrorists and foiling their plots) and for ill (digging up dirt on political foes). Limits on these powers must be defined and overseen.

Congress needs to revisit the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act, which was passed when Facebook inventor Mark Zuckerberg was a toddler. It's absurd that an e-mail should not have the same protection as a letter in a file cabinet. Yes, law-enforcement investigators should be able to track and read a suspect's e-mail - but only after making their case to a judge.

This nation must respect and vigilantly maintain a balance between security and privacy, famously defined by Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis in 1928 as the "right to be left alone."
2012-11-15 11:00:20 AM  
1 votes:

wambu: I suspect that there were some classified documents in the Google Docs dead drop that the lovers shared or the mistress got some clasified info via pillow talk. Both are serious breaches of security, especially for the Director of the C.I.Farking.A.


I've worked with sensitive info before (at a hospital) and the idea that you'd casually share something like a patient's name - or a missile site, or a troop movement, or anything remotely resembling sensitive information - is so ludicrous, especially for someone who managed to not be a farkup for 30+ years in the military (even earning some stars), it barely warrants consideration.

You'd need some kind of something (evidence, allegation) to lead you down that path. Unless our Ms Kelley knows things she shouldn't (or has documents she shouldn't even have seen), I'd abandon that speculation.

// I know she had sensitive documents in her house, but so do many, many people (with government-issued laptops)
// should she never have been near them in the first place (i.e. is she not even cleared to know what's in them), forget the "having them in an insecure facility" part
2012-11-15 10:37:48 AM  
1 votes:

chuckufarlie: Diogenes: chuckufarlie: Can somebody explain to me how any of this is important? why should Petraeus resign for having sex with a woman that was not his wife? If everybody inside the beltway was held up to that standard, they would all have to resign. They only person that should be pissed is his wife.

Potential to blackmail the highest intelligence officer in the land, duh. And as I said in another thread, this whole thing has revealed some serious flaws in the system that are being overshadowed by the sleaze.

there is no potential for blackmail. We all know about it now.

As for your serious flaws idea. That is as stupid as it gets.


The reason it's a career ender here is because it's a breach of protocol. Yes, in this instance, the cat's out of the bag. But the policy is in place so this shiat, and the potential for security and intelligence breaches, doesn't happen in the first place.

Your suggesting the rules are irrelevant once the transgression has occurred. THAT is as stupid as it gets.
2012-11-15 10:19:30 AM  
1 votes:

Diogenes: chuckufarlie: Can somebody explain to me how any of this is important? why should Petraeus resign for having sex with a woman that was not his wife? If everybody inside the beltway was held up to that standard, they would all have to resign. They only person that should be pissed is his wife.

Potential to blackmail the highest intelligence officer in the land, duh. And as I said in another thread, this whole thing has revealed some serious flaws in the system that are being overshadowed by the sleaze.


there is no potential for blackmail. We all know about it now.

As for your serious flaws idea. That is as stupid as it gets.
2012-11-15 10:07:27 AM  
1 votes:

chuckufarlie: Can somebody explain to me how any of this is important? why should Petraeus resign for having sex with a woman that was not his wife? If everybody inside the beltway was held up to that standard, they would all have to resign. They only person that should be pissed is his wife.


Potential to blackmail the highest intelligence officer in the land, duh. And as I said in another thread, this whole thing has revealed some serious flaws in the system that are being overshadowed by the sleaze.
2012-11-15 09:54:43 AM  
1 votes:
An associate of Humphries told ABC News that it was hard to believe that Humphries had contacted elected officials about the case because "everyone knows that's professional suicide" and Humphries is "top notch."

The same could be said of Petraus.

And this guy looks like Rick Scott's twin. I wonder if the Governor underwent mitosis.
2012-11-15 09:45:25 AM  
1 votes:
I want to care about this because it seems like it would be juicy but I can't bring myself to give a fark about it... sorry media.
2012-11-15 09:38:32 AM  
1 votes:
www.mcclaneonline.com
I hope this doesn't impact his teaching job.
 
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