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(CBC)   Comforting: Getting a large oil delivery in preparation for winter. Not comforting: Getting a large oil delivery in preparation for winter when your home is all-electric   (cbc.ca) divider line 19
    More: Fail, oil depot  
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7239 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Nov 2012 at 10:46 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-11-15 11:46:02 AM
2 votes:

poughdrew: I still don't understand why you wouldn't take the time and effort to convert the nozzle so it sprays back out at the guy who is filling it up. Haha, now you're covered in oil, oil guy.


You can go to jail for purposefully spilling oil.
2012-11-15 10:57:49 AM
2 votes:
...which is why you always remove the filler tube when you remove an oil tank.
2012-11-15 11:39:32 AM
1 votes:

C0rf: I'm annoyed at the prospect of ripping out a nearly-new setup to replace it with natural gas if I want effective warmth between November and February...


It will be worth it. While you're at it, get natural gas to your kitchen and laundry room too, and replace those appliances (Sears Outlet is usually excellent.) My utility bills barely exist when I'm not heating or cooling the house, and I only cooled the house this summer (Pennsylvania) because we had a tenant as a favor.
2012-11-15 11:36:10 AM
1 votes:

C0rf: Wife and I bought a home two years ago that had been renovated to use all electric appliances and HVAC. The electric "furnace" is like a breath of lukewarm air costing $300 monthly to operate when the temperature gets down below freezing, and that's just in Maryland. I'm annoyed at the prospect of ripping out a nearly-new setup to replace it with natural gas if I want effective warmth between November and February...

And this guy was switching TO electrical heat? In Canada?! Brrr.


Our house here in STL had electric heat. Even with great insulation, heating was expensive and not all that comfortable. $300 electric bills in December and January were not unusual at all.

Last year I put in a dual fuel heat pump/gas furnace (95% efficiency) setup and the heating and cooling bills went WAY down. Winter is darn near dirt cheap now- electric bills are under $100 and gas bills no more than $50.
2012-11-15 11:28:13 AM
1 votes:
Am I the only one thinking- sweet, free new house!
2012-11-15 11:26:01 AM
1 votes:

akula: For those of you northeast folks, how long does a tank of heating oil last?

Just curious... such things are pretty well unknown here in this area, and I've no experience with such things. I can only imagine running out right when a cold spell hits.


For me about two months but your mileage may vary based on the size of the house/tank and how toasty you want it. Most people on oil have the oil company stop by regularly and top up the tank because you don't want to run out not just because of the obvious cold house problem but the oil lines will freeze and that is all sorts of annoying.
2012-11-15 11:24:10 AM
1 votes:

tommyl66: THX 1138: Mr. Eugenides: I bet you that the previous homeowner was on an oil keep full program and forgot to stop service before selling the house

Considering the article says he recently bought the house, I doubt he had any sort of relationship at all with the delivery company.

Better?


FTfarkingfirstlineoftheFA: "A home near Victoria had to be demolished after an oil company got its addresses mixed up and delivered a load of furnace oil to the wrong house."
2012-11-15 11:15:33 AM
1 votes:

give me doughnuts: FTA: The cost of the cleanup and rebuilding of the home is being covered by the oil company's insurance.

Translation: We'll replace your house, so please don't sue us and get awarded twenty times its value.


except.

Canada
2012-11-15 11:09:10 AM
1 votes:

THX 1138: Mr. Eugenides: I bet you that the previous homeowner was on an oil keep full program and forgot to stop service before selling the house

Considering the article says he recently bought the house, I doubt he had any sort of relationship at all with the delivery company.


Better?
2012-11-15 11:04:55 AM
1 votes:

Mr. Eugenides: I bet you that the homeowner was on an oil keep full program


Considering the article says he recently bought the house, I doubt he had any sort of relationship at all with the delivery company.
2012-11-15 11:03:19 AM
1 votes:
Hum, not to be evil but this doesn't sound like that bad of a deal for the Home owner. Only one who really looses is the insurance company, but comercial insurance has a tendency to be fairly low risk high profit anyway so, oh well just a tiny bit lower dividend to the shareholders.
2012-11-15 11:02:31 AM
1 votes:
Oh crap. I replaced my oil furnace with a natural gas furnace 20 years ago. The tank was removed, but the filler tube is still there! I'm in PANIC mode. I better stop at the hardware store on the way home. I hope I'm not too late.
2012-11-15 11:01:58 AM
1 votes:
FTA: The cost of the cleanup and rebuilding of the home is being covered by the oil company's insurance.

Translation: We'll replace your house, so please don't sue us and get awarded twenty times its value.
2012-11-15 11:01:05 AM
1 votes:
this happens quite a number of times actually.
2012-11-15 10:59:08 AM
1 votes:
You'd think you'd put a padlock on the filler tube or plug it with expansion foam.

At least the renovations will now be free.
2012-11-15 10:57:13 AM
1 votes:
How hard would it be when doing these conversions to cap off the filler tube and pour a little quickcrete in there to prevent these things. I'm thinking maybe a half hour worth of labor, a partial bag of quickcrete and a pipe cap can't be more than about $50 or so added to the bill.
2012-11-15 10:56:22 AM
1 votes:
Not that I think it's the home owners fault but...If you took the oil tank out of service, don't you think it would be a good idea to cap it or otherwise block off the fill tube?

/don't know how they work
//not living like it's 1899
2012-11-15 10:50:46 AM
1 votes:

Terry Phillips had recently bought the house


That stinks. "Hey, you just moved in but now your house is hosed and you have to move AGAIN."

300 litres is about 70 gallons. Yeesh.
2012-11-15 10:49:18 AM
1 votes:
Yikes. I'm going to guess the driver lost his job on that one.
 
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