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(ABC News)   How to avoid Jury Duty: arrive disheveled, act crazy, claim you have PTSD. How to get caught avoiding Jury Duty: call in to a radio show and brag about how you got out of jury duty   (abcnews.go.com ) divider line
    More: Fail, PTSD, jury duty, NYU Langone Medical Center, Denver District Attorney, court reporter, anxiety disorders, jury selection  
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5902 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Nov 2012 at 1:45 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



149 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2012-11-14 12:40:12 PM  
People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.
 
2012-11-14 12:46:29 PM  
Half surprised she didn't ask for a trial by jury.
 
2012-11-14 01:00:12 PM  
You could always pull a Ted Nugent and just shiat yourself.
 
2012-11-14 01:09:48 PM  
I haven't been called since I moved to Morris County. got called twice in Hudson, once they simply didn't get to my number and said anyone past X excused. the second time was right after I moved, so I was no longer a resident of the county. I'm eagerly awaiting my turn this time.
 
2012-11-14 01:35:05 PM  
cdn.buzznet.com

"I really don't think it's fair for me to be on a jury since I'm a hologram."
 
wee
2012-11-14 01:44:03 PM  
It's hard to get jury duty seems like. I can't imagine having to work very hard to avoid it...
 
2012-11-14 01:47:28 PM  

wee: It's hard to get jury duty seems like. I can't imagine having to work very hard to avoid it...


From the experiences of friends, the more you don't want to do jury duty, the more likely you'll be on it.

So act like you really want the job.
 
2012-11-14 01:47:52 PM  
Douchebag.

One word descriptor for this individual.
 
2012-11-14 01:48:00 PM  
I never have to worry about jury duty in a criminal trial. I've called the DA a lopsided bastard to a news camera.
 
2012-11-14 01:49:47 PM  
I have jury duty tomorrow, so I'm getting a kick....

I've always thought that it would be interesting to serve on a jury. Which is why I probably won't get picked.
 
2012-11-14 01:52:07 PM  

Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.


So if someone can't afford to live on $5/day while on jury duty, they shouldn't have the right to complain?
 
2012-11-14 01:52:21 PM  
oldnewsissoexciting.jpg
 
2012-11-14 01:53:35 PM  

wildcardjack: I never have to worry about jury duty in a criminal trial. I've called the DA a lopsided bastard to a news camera.


If I ever have to go through voir dire again I"m going to tell them I'm biased against that particular prosecutor ever since he tried to put me in jail for being sane. If it's not him, I cannot in good conscious subject another individual to the same office that tried to put me in jail for being sane.

/true story
 
2012-11-14 01:54:15 PM  
CSB: I got called for jury duty a couple of months ago and one of the potential jurors didn't show up. Her excuse was that she was at a bachelorette party the night before and she was pretty hung over. When the clerk informed her that it didn't matter, the juror said she was sure she was still to drunk to drive. This was on a Monday morning and the bailiff informed us that they'd be paying a visit to that young lady real soon...
 
2012-11-14 01:54:31 PM  
$5 a day? Where? that sucks. I think it was $50 plus I got paid by my work.
 
2012-11-14 01:54:37 PM  

Cybernetic: I have jury duty tomorrow, so I'm getting a kick....

I've always thought that it would be interesting to serve on a jury. Which is why I probably won't get picked.


That's what got my excused last time. The actual question was "Have you ever felt that serving on a jury would be interesting?"

got excused after that round........they really don't want people they will have to sway or will put logical thought into things.
 
2012-11-14 01:57:07 PM  
be an engineer

I got booted (by the defense) right away. Many engineers I know had similar experiences. I think defense lawyers have something against engineers.
 
2012-11-14 01:57:33 PM  

abhorrent1: oldnewsissoexciting.jpg


Thought so too. To be fair, this is an article on the sentence she got for it.

/Could've used a "followup" tag instead
 
2012-11-14 01:57:42 PM  

Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.


although, it may be the case that people who don't vote will never be called in for jury duty...

/ sloth wins once again
 
2012-11-14 01:58:47 PM  
I get called for jury duty every three years, like clockwork. As soon as I tell them I'm a psychiatrist, I get dismissed by the ADA.

Who knew prosecutors didn't like psychiatrists?
 
2012-11-14 01:59:14 PM  
Currently on jury duty, well, more that I need to call for a couple more days. Pool is 250. I'm #224, and 1-153 were called in for today.

/Keeping fingers crossed to not get called in.
 
2012-11-14 02:00:20 PM  
I have served once and was dismissed during the first round a second time. The second time it would have hurt me financially and I applied for deferral first then they let me go after the first hour without anything being asked of me.
 
2012-11-14 02:00:44 PM  

the ha ha guy: So if someone can't afford to live on $5/day while on jury duty, they shouldn't have the right to complain?


Check your state's laws. Odds are your company has to pay you full wages for some of the time, and the state picks up a decent portion for the rest. Also, many states have laws that exempt anyone who would face financial hardship from serving on a jury

But let's not pretend that the people who try to get out of it are doing it for financial reasons. They're doing it because they're lazy, ignorant citizens.

pute kisses like a man: although, it may be the case that people who don't vote will never be called in for jury duty...


My state gets their potential jury pool from the DMV and tax records.
 
2012-11-14 02:00:45 PM  
Wait a minute, there are people in this world who, upon receiving a summons in the mail, DON'T just crumple it up, toss it in the trash and never hear anything about it ever again?


Huh...ya really do learn something new every day....
 
2012-11-14 02:02:02 PM  

ThurmanMerman: I get called for jury duty every three years, like clockwork. As soon as I tell them I'm a psychiatrist, I get dismissed by the ADA.


What does the American Dental Association have against psychiatrists?
 
2012-11-14 02:02:21 PM  

ThurmanMerman: I get called for jury duty every three years, like clockwork. As soon as I tell them I'm a psychiatrist, I get dismissed by the ADA.

Who knew prosecutors didn't like psychiatrists?


Damn I've been called in every year for the past 5 years, right around August. Every. Single. Year.

BUT every time I've gone, they've dismissed the entire jury room before anything happens. I show up, read a couple chapters in whatever book I have, bailiff walks in and tells everyon they're free to go.
 
2012-11-14 02:03:00 PM  
I've been called several times, and really want to serve on at least one jury.

But I'm always cut bc I actually *want* to be there.

Next time I'm going in kicking & screaming!! Noooooo: don't wanna be here!!
 
2012-11-14 02:03:06 PM  

Cybernetic: I have jury duty tomorrow, so I'm getting a kick....

I've always thought that it would be interesting to serve on a jury. Which is why I probably won't get picked.


I've been called to serve three times and only got out of it once.I was in the middle of moving.
 
2012-11-14 02:03:22 PM  
I just piss my pants and utter some incoherent nonsense.
 
2012-11-14 02:04:55 PM  

Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.


Ironically, my belief that jurists should not merely pass judgement on the evidence, but also have an actual say on what the government does, i.e., jury annulment, would surely get me excused from being on a jury.
 
2012-11-14 02:06:33 PM  

Why Would I Read the Article: Wait a minute, there are people in this world who, upon receiving a summons in the mail, DON'T just crumple it up, toss it in the trash and never hear anything about it ever again?


Huh...ya really do learn something new every day....


Wait, people still get mail? I haven't checked my mail box in six months.
 
2012-11-14 02:06:40 PM  

4of11: Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.

Ironically, my belief that jurists should not merely pass judgement on the evidence, but also have an actual say on what the government does, i.e., jury annulment, would surely get me excused from being on a jury.


Hehehe the two golden words that will get you out of any jury duty: Jury Nullification

I've actually wanted to sit in a marijuana possession trial, just so I could use that.
 
2012-11-14 02:07:50 PM  
I have a question for anyone who might know: Once you have been the victim/witness of a violent crime that has made its way through the court system do they just take your name off of the potential jurors list?
 
2012-11-14 02:07:51 PM  
Or you just respond to the summons by saying you're on vacation/out of the state on business.

I've been on vacation since 1994.
 
2012-11-14 02:07:59 PM  

Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.


Actually, I reserve the right to complain because I chose not to endorse the lesser of two evils. There is a difference between being too lazy to vote, and having an actual reason to not vote. I do not trust either candidate, I am not willing to become an additional tally that they feel endorses their entire platform.

The jury reaper hasn't come knocking, but I'm actually quite curious about the process and have heard conflicting stories from various people who've been called.
 
2012-11-14 02:08:55 PM  
I would love to be on a jury for a case so i can finally have my chance to nullify, but with my luck it will probably be someone on trial that is even more despicable than a judge/prosecutor, they're rare, but they're out there.
 
2012-11-14 02:09:31 PM  
I had jury duty in 1999. It was a bizzare real estate case. I did not expect to be picked, but both attorneys were keen on me being on that jury and I was the first one agreed on.

It was interesting for about an hour. After the first break, I wanted to strangle four of the other five jurors. The Judge gave explicit instructions (don't discuss the case, don't do your own research, etc.) and of course they want to discuss the case during lunch.

A week of this boring crap and constantly trying to not be engaged by the other jurors during breaks had me pretty flustered. I was trying to take it seriously, as it was a property dispute and I wanted to make sure I understood what was going on.

Then the judge declared a mistrial after a week.

Next time I'm declaring bias and getting my happy ass outta there
 
2012-11-14 02:11:11 PM  
"When the judge asked the entire panel if anyone had a mental illness, [Cole] stated she had difficulties getting ready in the morning, which was apparent to me by the way she was dressed."

I have jury duty in a couple of weeks. I'll have to remember that one.
 
2012-11-14 02:11:19 PM  
FTFA: "But her plot was foiled four months later when Judge Mansfield heard a woman bragging about how she faked mental illness to evade jury duty on a local radio show."

I didn't know that local radio shows impaneled juries. Good to know.

/prepositional phrases are hard
 
2012-11-14 02:11:43 PM  

DeathByGeekSquad: Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.

Actually, I reserve the right to complain because I chose not to endorse the lesser of two evils. There is a difference between being too lazy to vote, and having an actual reason to not vote. I do not trust either candidate, I am not willing to become an additional tally that they feel endorses their entire platform.

The jury reaper hasn't come knocking, but I'm actually quite curious about the process and have heard conflicting stories from various people who've been called.


Thisity farking this this.
 
2012-11-14 02:12:54 PM  

4of11: Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.

Ironically, my belief that jurists should not merely pass judgement on the evidence, but also have an actual say on what the government does, i.e., jury annulment, would surely get me excused from being on a jury.


(a) Nullification, not annulment, is the preferred term for the crime you're talking about.
(b) Nullification is, as I just said, criminal: if you swear an oath to uphold the law as instructed by the court (which is what all jurors must do) and then proceed to act in direct contradiction with the law (i.e. to refuse to find guilt because you dispute the law as opposed to the evidence) then you commit perjury. If you're open to the court (i.e. telling them that you believe in nullification) this doesn't change the fact that your Oath is violated by nullification.
(c) The next time you're proud of nullification, remember that it has been used for as much evil as good: every time a jury of Good Ol' Boys let off a Southerner who murdered a minority, it was nullification, just as much as whatever crime you're proud to ignore. If you think you're above the system of laws the rest of us abide by, you're better than any other criminal.
 
2012-11-14 02:14:55 PM  

Aarontology: the ha ha guy: So if someone can't afford to live on $5/day while on jury duty, they shouldn't have the right to complain?

Check your state's laws. Odds are your company has to pay you full wages for some of the time, and the state picks up a decent portion for the rest. Also, many states have laws that exempt anyone who would face financial hardship from serving on a jury

But let's not pretend that the people who try to get out of it are doing it for financial reasons. They're doing it because they're lazy, ignorant citizens.


My state has no such provision regarding employer reimbursement for time off, nor any reasonable allowance for financial hardship. If you're called, you get $5. Can't afford that? Tough.

I agree that many people don't have a legitimate reason to get out of jury duty, but I don't appreciate it when those who do have legitimate hardships are lumped together with the idiots like the one in TFA.
 
2012-11-14 02:17:42 PM  
After many years of avoiding jury duty, due to college, working freelance. I finally had a job which paid while I did jury duty. I was actually looking forward to serving. I was promptly dismissed for asking too many questions during selection! Tossed along with a police dispatcher and a rocket scientist.
 
2012-11-14 02:17:46 PM  

the ha ha guy: My state has no such provision regarding employer reimbursement for time off, nor any reasonable allowance for financial hardship. If you're called, you get $5. Can't afford that? Tough.


What state is this?
 
2012-11-14 02:18:15 PM  
honestly, it's so easy to get out of jury duty without even lying, I don't know what the big deal is. The thing that scared me was how many people WANTED to be on a jury for the $40 a day

//yay brooklyn
/8 years til I'm called again
 
2012-11-14 02:18:41 PM  

Cybernetic: I have jury duty tomorrow, so I'm getting a kick....

I've always thought that it would be interesting to serve on a jury. Which is why I probably won't get picked.


I'm with you. I'd like to serve as well. I've only seen the process from one side and would like to see it from the juries' perspective. I've been called a few times, but when I show up in uniform, I'm always the first one dismissed.


/I can spot a guilty person like * snap * that!
 
2012-11-14 02:21:22 PM  
this biatch doesn't look like she has anywhere else to be.. maybe at home with her fity cats.
 
2012-11-14 02:22:16 PM  
Want to get off a jury fast on a civil injury case?

Tell the plaintiffs lawyer you work in the medical field.

/personal experience.
 
2012-11-14 02:23:36 PM  

Tricky Chicken: be an engineer

I got booted (by the defense) right away. Many engineers I know had similar experiences. I think defense lawyers have something against engineers.


That didn't work so well when I was selected for a 7-week murder trial a few years ago.
 
2012-11-14 02:24:16 PM  

mattharvest: the ha ha guy: My state has no such provision regarding employer reimbursement for time off, nor any reasonable allowance for financial hardship. If you're called, you get $5. Can't afford that? Tough.

What state is this?


http://www.harfordcountymd.gov/juryduty/faq.cfm

I was called in 2002. The daily rate has apparently went up since then, but everything else is just as it was when I was called.
 
2012-11-14 02:25:04 PM  
I was called last month, but didn't get past the voir dire. Which sucks because I actually want to serve, and as a currently unemployed person I could've used an extra couple of $60 days.

Yet a woman who was picked admitted that English was her second language, she was not comfortably fluent, and might have difficulty following the case. They wanted her, and dismissed everyone with a Bachelors or higher.

Go figure, it was a false arrest/ police brutality case.
 
2012-11-14 02:26:08 PM  
You know what got me out of jury duty? Answering questions during vore dire honestly, and with logic. Like pointing out it's inconsistent for the prosecutor to argue that intent is important in the hypothetical about inadvertently taking office supplies home, and then asking in a different hypothetical traffic case if I'd vote to convict someone who was going 66 in a 65, because that's the law*. Neither prosecutors nor defense attorneys want a juror like that. They want easily manipulable emotional 'tards.


*I pointed out that a 2% error in the speedometer calibration could result in a person going 66 when his speedometer read 65, and then I pointed out that my current car is miscalibrated by a measured 2.4%, so no, I wouldn't vote to convict on just that set of facts.
 
2012-11-14 02:27:44 PM  

Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.


This. Dodging your civic responsibilities means that you hate your country. It boggles my mind how irresponsible most people are.
 
2012-11-14 02:28:00 PM  

mattharvest:
(b) Nullification is, as I just said, criminal: if you swear an oath to uphold the law as instructed by the court (which is what all jurors must do) and then proceed to act in direct contradiction with the law (i.e. to refuse to find guilt because you dispute the law as opposed to the evidence) then you commit perjury. If you're open to the court (i.e. telling them that you believe in nullification) this doesn't change the fact that your Oath is violated by nullification.


Is it a crime to refuse to take the oath?

In any event, as far as I can tell, the overall consensus is that jury nullification is entirely legal (for example: I'd take Straight Dope over your word). There's just no requirement to inform jurors of it.

(c) The next time you're proud of nullification, remember that it has been used for as much evil as good: every time a jury of Good Ol' Boys let off a Southerner who murdered a minority, it was nullification, just as much as whatever crime you're proud to ignore. If you think you're above the system of laws the rest of us abide by, you're better than any other criminal.

I know. And I also know the law itself has certainly served evil on many occasions, and continues to. Anything can be used for good or ill.

Doesn't change my belief that jury nullification is the last defense against government run a muck.
 
2012-11-14 02:30:03 PM  

namegoeshere: I was called last month, but didn't get past the voir dire. Which sucks because I actually want to serve, and as a currently unemployed person I could've used an extra couple of $60 days.

Yet a woman who was picked admitted that English was her second language, she was not comfortably fluent, and might have difficulty following the case. They wanted her, and dismissed everyone with a Bachelors or higher.

Go figure, it was a false arrest/ police brutality case.


That seems to be pretty common. Both times the lawyers had me booted by 11am Monday morning once they found out I was an IT systems analyst with a MBA.
 
2012-11-14 02:30:09 PM  

CapeFearCadaver: I have a question for anyone who might know: Once you have been the victim/witness of a violent crime that has made its way through the court system do they just take your name off of the potential jurors list?


On the last case I was in the jury pool for, the judge asked if anybody had been a witness of the crime or lived in the immediate vicinity. those people were summarily excused. Then they read off a list of names, and if you knew somebody with one of the names you were to come forward. Those people were asked a few questions at the bench while a white noise generator muffeled anything they would say. Some were dismissed. Eventually they started sitting people in the jury box. They would call your jurror number and the defense could excuse you then the prosecution got a chance to excuse you. The defense excused me and I went home.
 
2012-11-14 02:32:00 PM  

namegoeshere: I was called last month, but didn't get past the voir dire. Which sucks because I actually want to serve, and as a currently unemployed person I could've used an extra couple of $60 days.

Yet a woman who was picked admitted that English was her second language, she was not comfortably fluent, and might have difficulty following the case. They wanted her, and dismissed everyone with a Bachelors or higher.

Go figure, it was a false arrest/ police brutality case.


Which is why you don't want to be on jury duty. You want to be on a jury deciding someone's fate and half the jury doesn't even know what's going on?
 
2012-11-14 02:32:56 PM  

Tricky Chicken: be an engineer

I got booted (by the defense) right away. Many engineers I know had similar experiences. I think defense lawyers have something against engineers.


My husband's an engineer & he gets chosen every time. Well, except for one trial that was a capital offense & he said he couldn't sentence someone to death.
 
2012-11-14 02:34:46 PM  

CheneyTheDick: honestly, it's so easy to get out of jury duty without even lying, I don't know what the big deal is. The thing that scared me was how many people WANTED to be on a jury for the $40 a day

//yay brooklyn
/8 years til I'm called again


All I do is answer the questions about my level of education and what kind of work I do and speak in complex sentence, using formal English and I am dismissed. Lawyers really do want only stupid people on juries if they can swing it. I got called once and a painfully stupid woman argued that she could not be called for jury duty because she lived in the city, not the county and this was the county court, not the municipal. The judge tried to explain it to her four times before giving up and telling her that she needed just accept that she was rightfully called. The defense attorney immediately said "This juror is acceptable, your honor."
 
2012-11-14 02:34:50 PM  
I specifically did not register to vote when I recently moved so that I would not be called in for jury duty in this God forsaken county. I figured, "The election's just been held. Why register to vote NOW? I'll just wait for two years..."

Well, do you know what??? The damn Secretary of State clerk registered me to vote ANYWAY. Sneaky bastard.

I tossed my voter ID card right in the trash when it showed up in the mail by surprise the other day.

...Not that doing so would change anything.

I was trying to be clever -- get out the jury duty pool for at least a couple of years. Didn't work.
 
2012-11-14 02:35:48 PM  
The best story of getting out of jury duty was from my boss. And it was just a bizarre coincidence (but absolutely true)...

The judge asked if anyone knew any of the people involved in the case.
My boss stated, "I think I know you, your Honour"
The judge replied "Yes, you do look familiar, but I can't quite place from where"/
And my boss remembered "Oh, yes, I dated your daughter a couple of years ago".
The judge dismissed him on the spot!
 
2012-11-14 02:36:28 PM  

4of11: Is it a crime to refuse to take the oath?


Yes, it's called "Contempt of Court". In practice, refusing to follow the lawful order of the judge (such as to take the oath) can result in indefinite imprisonment, though in practice it will more likely lead to a suspended jail sentence of some amount (depending on the state) and/or a fine.

4of11: In any event, as far as I can tell, the overall consensus is that jury nullification is entirely legal (for example: I'd take Straight Dope over your word). There's just no requirement to inform jurors of it.


You might want to read that article more closely; it makes it clear that it isn't actually legal (and they completely ignore the issue of perjury/contempt, which is a dead giveaway that it's a flawed article). Their quote is here: " So while ignoring the law is not what the jury is supposed to do, the practical fact is that jurors cannot be stopped from doing it. In that sense, it's legal."

You also might want to look at the current shenanigans around the jury foreman in the US Samsung v. Apple case; while normally the court will not inquire as to deliberations, it will do so when it appears a juror has subverted the legal process (such as in nullification). If you never given any evidence it happened, then nothing will happen, but if another juror were to tell the judge you were advocating that they violate their oaths, then you're in trouble.

There is a difference between it being difficult to prosecute a crime, and that crime not existing.

But hey, feel free to risk your life, liberty and rights just so you can feel like you're better than the rest of us and aren't obligated to follow the law.
 
2012-11-14 02:37:32 PM  

WizardofToast: So act like you really want the job.


That would explain my situation, I guess. I don't really care much either way, and I get to go in later this month for the first time in my nearly 30 years.

/Ok, it probably has more to do with moving around a lot than how much I care, but that's not nearly as amusing to consider. So I won't.
 
Ant
2012-11-14 02:39:40 PM  
Don't you merely need to have an opinion in order to be passed over for jury duty?
 
2012-11-14 02:39:43 PM  

4of11: mattharvest:
(b) Nullification is, as I just said, criminal: if you swear an oath to uphold the law as instructed by the court (which is what all jurors must do) and then proceed to act in direct contradiction with the law (i.e. to refuse to find guilt because you dispute the law as opposed to the evidence) then you commit perjury. If you're open to the court (i.e. telling them that you believe in nullification) this doesn't change the fact that your Oath is violated by nullification.

Is it a crime to refuse to take the oath?

In any event, as far as I can tell, the overall consensus is that jury nullification is entirely legal (for example: I'd take Straight Dope over your word). There's just no requirement to inform jurors of it.

(c) The next time you're proud of nullification, remember that it has been used for as much evil as good: every time a jury of Good Ol' Boys let off a Southerner who murdered a minority, it was nullification, just as much as whatever crime you're proud to ignore. If you think you're above the system of laws the rest of us abide by, you're better than any other criminal.

I know. And I also know the law itself has certainly served evil on many occasions, and continues to. Anything can be used for good or ill.

Doesn't change my belief that jury nullification is the last defense against government run a muck.


It's "run amok".
 
2012-11-14 02:40:09 PM  

BinderWoman: Tricky Chicken: be an engineer

I got booted (by the defense) right away. Many engineers I know had similar experiences. I think defense lawyers have something against engineers.

My husband's an engineer & he gets chosen every time. Well, except for one trial that was a capital offense & he said he couldn't sentence someone to death.


It could be because I am a upper-middle class white guy and every case I've been called for involved minority defendants. So I am viewed as either unlikely to accept an emotionally based defense or I am assumed a racist.

Maybe if I were called for a industrial material quality dispute they may want me.
 
2012-11-14 02:41:46 PM  

suburbanguy: Doesn't change my belief that jury nullification is the last defense against government run a muck.

It's "run amok".


Actually, the last defense is violence.

Run A Mucks are fun races, though. The Marines do a pretty fun one at Quantico, if I remember correctly.
 
2012-11-14 02:43:59 PM  
Pretend you are a racist.

Go down there and call everyone a honkey.
 
2012-11-14 02:46:08 PM  
I got my cube-mates brother out of Jury duty last year. He sent her a text and biatching he was on jury duty waiting to be questioned (case in the news). I told her my sister was the ADA on that case she let him know he raised his hand and said my little sister and your brother are co-workers and share a workspace. He was immediately dismissed.
 
2012-11-14 02:46:51 PM  

BalugaJoe: Pretend you are a racist.

Go down there and call everyone a honkey.


Enjoy your contempt charge and overnight stay in lockup.
 
2012-11-14 02:48:37 PM  
I actually don't mind jury duty. I get paid regardless and it breaks the monotony. They only last a day or 2 for the most part and the last one I was picked I was only there for an hour about a guy being naked in his house. Also once your on a jury you don't get called again for at least 5 years. I'd rather get called and spend a few hours on a jury every 5 years than having to call every day for a month year after year.
 
2012-11-14 02:49:24 PM  

thisisarepeat: DeathByGeekSquad: Actually, I reserve the right to complain because I chose not to endorse the lesser of two evils. There is a difference between being too lazy to vote, and having an actual reason to not vote. I do not trust either candidate, I am not willing to become an additional tally that they feel endorses their entire platform.

The jury reaper hasn't come knocking, but I'm actually quite curious about the process and have heard conflicting stories from various people who've been called.

Thisity farking this this.


In most states, there are six or more candidates. Perhaps that isn't the case in your two states. But I doubt it.
 
2012-11-14 02:50:33 PM  

thisisarepeat: ...


Speaking of you, is this a repeat? Or do we just have a lot of people trying and failing at the brain sweepstakes this way.
 
2012-11-14 02:50:40 PM  
I usually just start talking about jury nullification and how farked up the drug laws are in this country or how traffic enforcement is little more than a scam and revenue source. I honestly believe both of these things to a great degree. My conscious is clear.
 
2012-11-14 02:51:29 PM  

mattharvest: suburbanguy: Doesn't change my belief that jury nullification is the last defense against government run a muck.

It's "run amok".

Actually, the last defense is violence.

Run A Mucks are fun races, though. The Marines do a pretty fun one at Quantico, if I remember correctly.


Yeah - but I doubt the jury is doing a Tough Mudder to protest large government. :-)
 
2012-11-14 02:52:34 PM  
She's an author of a mystical Xian self-help book whose Amazon blurb reads:

"Seven Initiations with El-Way's Secrets can renew your spiritual outlook and help you deal with difficult relationships and situations. El-Way's secrets explore Seven Initiations hidden in Genesis 9:11 and expose the King warned about in Revelation 9:11." [emphasis mine]
 
2012-11-14 02:55:53 PM  

hutchkc: I actually don't mind jury duty. I get paid regardless and it breaks the monotony. They only last a day or 2 for the most part and the last one I was picked I was only there for an hour about a guy being naked in his house. Also once your on a jury you don't get called again for at least 5 years. I'd rather get called and spend a few hours on a jury every 5 years than having to call every day for a month year after year.


I think in my case as soon as I sat in the jurrors box it counted as being on a jury and when I got excused it counted the same as if I had sat the whole thing. I wouldn't mind though, since I also get compensated for jury duty.
 
2012-11-14 02:59:39 PM  

Tricky Chicken: hutchkc: I actually don't mind jury duty. I get paid regardless and it breaks the monotony. They only last a day or 2 for the most part and the last one I was picked I was only there for an hour about a guy being naked in his house. Also once your on a jury you don't get called again for at least 5 years. I'd rather get called and spend a few hours on a jury every 5 years than having to call every day for a month year after year.

I think in my case as soon as I sat in the jurrors box it counted as being on a jury and when I got excused it counted the same as if I had sat the whole thing. I wouldn't mind though, since I also get compensated for jury duty.


In my case, it also meant my pick of some of the better menus from city restaurants for lunch carryout. That wasn't bad.
 
2012-11-14 03:00:32 PM  
Where I live, jury duty is tied to both voter registration and driver's licenses, but I think they only call registered voters. I've lived here for 12 years or so now, and haven't ever been called, so that's a good. If I ever do get called though, I don't think the rich white guy thing will get me out, since that's my whole county, for the most part.
 
Ant
2012-11-14 03:05:41 PM  
I actually want to serve. I never get called.
 
2012-11-14 03:08:00 PM  

robohobo: Where I live, jury duty is tied to both voter registration and driver's licenses, but I think they only call registered voters. I've lived here for 12 years or so now, and haven't ever been called, so that's a good. If I ever do get called though, I don't think the rich white guy thing will get me out, since that's my whole county, for the most part.


California uses both my wife's been called a few times & she's not a US citizen.
 
2012-11-14 03:08:16 PM  
The best way to avoid jury duty is to show up in a suit and tie, with a fresh haircut, and pay close attention to everything going on in the court room.
 
2012-11-14 03:10:38 PM  
Every time I've been on the voir dire they've asked me a question that could be answered yes or no, and I've answered it with a logical, reasoned response. That's always been enough for them to dismiss me.
 
2012-11-14 03:12:03 PM  
I actually wanted to be on the jury, thought it might be interesting, but I had to tell the Judge that I was closing on a new house the next day and would not be a resident of his county anymore if the trial went beyond the present day.
 
2012-11-14 03:13:11 PM  
sat on a jury for a homicide trial

2 days of testimony on hair follicles by the FBI, will make you homicidal

If you want on the jury, during the voire dire questions act nervous and
shoot the middle on your answers
 
2012-11-14 03:17:31 PM  
I'd probably be scared that if I was on a jury, it would be in a criminal trial of some organized crime person who had no problem with killing jury members to prove a point.

/always get an F in luck
 
2012-11-14 03:21:39 PM  

mattharvest: (b) Nullification is, as I just said, criminal: if you swear an oath to uphold the law as instructed by the court (which is what all jurors must do) and then proceed to act in direct contradiction with the law (i.e. to refuse to find guilt because you dispute the law as opposed to the evidence) then you commit perjury. If you're open to the court (i.e. telling them that you believe in nullification) this doesn't change the fact that your Oath is violated by nullification.


In New Hampshire, it is required by law that, as of Jan 1, 2013, the jury may be informed that they judge both the facts and the law:

519:23-a Right of Accused. In all criminal proceedings the court shall permit the defense to inform the jury of its right to judge the facts and the application of the law in relation to the facts in controversy.

HB 146, signed into law this year.

So, no, nullification is not a violation of the juror's oath. It is a legitimate application of the historical purpose of the jury system, the entire reason why it was enshrined in Constitution as a right of the accused. If the oath demanded by the court is not consistent with this purpose, the oath itself is illegitimate and void.
 
2012-11-14 03:23:45 PM  
I have the EXACT same name as my father. First, middle, last. I do NOT have a junior on the end. My father has been called in for jury duty no less than 5 times in the past 10 years. While I have not been called once.

I think they must be confusing the two of us or something. He loves to server anyhow, so it all works out!
 
2012-11-14 03:26:53 PM  

the ha ha guy: Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.

So if someone can't afford to live on $5/day while on jury duty, they shouldn't have the right to complain?



Don't lie, file for a hardship.  There's a system in place to handle these things.  I have no problem with someone trying to get out of jury duty if it honestly would cause them harm.  Just do it the right way.
 
2012-11-14 03:36:39 PM  

the ha ha guy: Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.

So if someone can't afford to live on $5/day while on jury duty, they shouldn't have the right to complain?


You have one duty as a citizen of the United States and that is to sit in judgement of a fellow citizen. Jury duty is literally a group of fellow citizens acting as the sovereign of the United States. I'm all ways amazed at the people who whine about a jury ruling, but do everything they can to get out of jury duty.
 
2012-11-14 03:36:49 PM  

DeathByGeekSquad: Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.

Actually, I reserve the right to complain because I chose not to endorse the lesser of two evils. There is a difference between being too lazy to vote, and having an actual reason to not vote. I do not trust either candidate, I am not willing to become an additional tally that they feel endorses their entire platform.

The jury reaper hasn't come knocking, but I'm actually quite curious about the process and have heard conflicting stories from various people who've been called.


If only there were more than two candidates...or other issues on the ballot besides the presidency.....

Wait, did I just get trolled?
 
2012-11-14 03:38:02 PM  

Why Would I Read the Article: Wait a minute, there are people in this world who, upon receiving a summons in the mail, DON'T just crumple it up, toss it in the trash and never hear anything about it ever again?


Huh...ya really do learn something new every day....


You should be exiled from the US, anybody who does not show up for jury duty should be exiled from the US.
 
2012-11-14 03:40:36 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: You could always pull a Ted Nugent and just shiat yourself.


I'm going to assume this lady is a conservative, because she listens to and calls into AM Talk radio.

It's funny how conservatives claim to be patriotic Americans, but when it comes time to serve their country, they lie to get out of it by shiatting their pants or claiming PTSD.
 
2012-11-14 03:42:42 PM  

Ant: Don't you merely need to have an opinion in order to be passed over for jury duty?



CSB:
 
Was in voir dire for a civil trial.  Some personal injury stuff.  Got asked what I do, and told the truth: I'm in IT and I also write Op-Ed pieces for some fairly large newspapers.  A recent one on tort reform.
 
Judge actually called me the chambers thinking I was BSing.  I wasn't.
 
Booted me instantly.  This wasn't a ploy to get removed, I told the truth, and was interested if an opinionated person would be booted instantly.  Kinda sad, actually.
 
2012-11-14 03:43:23 PM  

bigvicproton: namegoeshere: I was called last month, but didn't get past the voir dire. Which sucks because I actually want to serve, and as a currently unemployed person I could've used an extra couple of $60 days.

Yet a woman who was picked admitted that English was her second language, she was not comfortably fluent, and might have difficulty following the case. They wanted her, and dismissed everyone with a Bachelors or higher.

Go figure, it was a false arrest/ police brutality case.

Which is why you don't want to be on jury duty. You want to be on a jury deciding someone's fate and half the jury doesn't even know what's going on?


I sure as hell don't ever want to be in front of such a jury.

*shudder*
 
2012-11-14 03:44:44 PM  
I was just on a jury a few months ago for a robbery case. Definitely an interesting experience. Some people had ridiculous excuses to get out. One lady just said "religious reasons". The judge asked her to elaborate and she said she "didn't want to elaborate any further"... And she was told she could leave. One girl said "medical reasons". I overheard her at the judge's bench explain that she was having a really bad period. I think they let her go because the judge and both lawyers were guys, and none of them felt comfortable talking about it.
 
2012-11-14 03:49:06 PM  

CCCarnie: . One girl said "medical reasons". I overheard her at the judge's bench explain that she was having a really bad period. I think they let her go because the judge and both lawyers were guys, and none of them felt comfortable talking about it.


Equality in action!
 
2012-11-14 03:53:44 PM  
The trick is to say you're prejudiced against all races.
 
2012-11-14 03:57:19 PM  
Hey, here's an idea.

When you get a summons for jury duty, instead of whining and trying to get out of it - think to yourself, "I'm really lucky to live in a country where citizens have the power to determine the guilt and innocence of a suspect - not some goverment bureaucrat."
 
2012-11-14 03:59:12 PM  
Felony, there used to be a time when that described a serious crime. I guess it's in the eye of the beholder, of course the beholder(s) in this case are a part of our glorious justice system.
 
2012-11-14 03:59:27 PM  

Pichu0102: I'd probably be scared that if I was on a jury, it would be in a criminal trial of some organized crime person who had no problem with killing jury members to prove a point.

/always get an F in luck


images.wikia.com
 
2012-11-14 03:59:30 PM  

kevinfra: Hey, here's an idea.

When you get a summons for jury duty, instead of whining and trying to get out of it - think to yourself, "I'm really lucky to live in a country where citizens have the power to determine the guilt and innocence of a suspect - not some goverment bureaucrat."


Sure, but the bureaucrats decide the punishment.
 
2012-11-14 03:59:36 PM  

CCCarnie: One lady just said "religious reasons". The judge asked her to elaborate and she said she "didn't want to elaborate any further"... And she was told she could leave.


My father saw a juror candidate who said he couldn't serve because he couldn't judge his fellow man. He was told he could leave.
 
2012-11-14 04:00:45 PM  
Hurray for repeats!
 
2012-11-14 04:01:31 PM  

Pichu0102: I'd probably be scared that if I was on a jury, it would be in a criminal trial of some organized crime person who had no problem with killing jury members to prove a point.

/always get an F in luck


But so far, you've never been called to be a juror in an organized crime trial. Maybe you get an A in luck.
 
BHK
2012-11-14 04:03:19 PM  

Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.


It's just the opposite. You vote, so you have no right to complain when the voters decide something you don't like. Those who don't participate have every right to complain about your attempt to force your morals on them.
 
Ant
2012-11-14 04:06:35 PM  
So what kind of questions do the prosecution and defense ask to see if they want to give you the boot?
 
2012-11-14 04:10:31 PM  
Been on a couple of juries. The last time I was called I took my prescription bottle of hydrocodone. Told them I had migraines (which is true). Also told them I would gladly serve. However, if while serving I started to see the aura stuff, I would need to take a couple of the pills asap and be in a darkened room for 6 to 8 hours.

Asked to step down.
 
2012-11-14 04:11:04 PM  

plausdeny: So, no, nullification is not a violation of the juror's oath. It is a legitimate application of the historical purpose of the jury system, the entire reason why it was enshrined in Constitution as a right of the accused. If the oath demanded by the court is not consistent with this purpose, the oath itself is illegitimate and void.


Talk to a lawyer: the application of the law is not nullification. It refers to whether the law correctly applies in this case. That statute in no way reads as authorizing nullification.

/Not barred in that state, so not providing legal advice, etc. there.
 
wee
2012-11-14 04:16:50 PM  

Tricky Chicken: I got booted (by the defense) right away. Many engineers I know had similar experiences. I think defense lawyers have something against engineers.


I think this might be the case. One time I got called, they asked what I did (IT, software enigneer) and I was immediately let go. Another time one of their questions was about "hacking into email" by guessing a password. I replied that I didn't really consider that a hack, and they asked for my definition. I was let go after they found out (as part of the follow up) that I had been doing network security a few years prior. 

The third time I got called they just came into the big waiting room around 1:00pm and told everyone they could leave. I think I went to the movies that afternoon.
 
2012-11-14 04:17:10 PM  

Aarontology: the ha ha guy: So if someone can't afford to live on $5/day while on jury duty, they shouldn't have the right to complain?

Check your state's laws. Odds are your company has to pay you full wages for some of the time, and the state picks up a decent portion for the rest. Also, many states have laws that exempt anyone who would face financial hardship from serving on a jury

But let's not pretend that the people who try to get out of it are doing it for financial reasons. They're doing it because they're lazy, ignorant citizens.

pute kisses like a man: although, it may be the case that people who don't vote will never be called in for jury duty...

My state gets their potential jury pool from the DMV and tax records.


This times eleventy. If you genuinely have financial hardship, tell the clerk that when you get there and have proof of same. They'll probably let you go right away.

That said, last time I went, I was studying for the MPREs (lawyer's Professional Responsibility exam) and had my study guide with me. Both attorneys looked at me when I went in for voir dire and I could see them thinking "CAUSE!"
 
2012-11-14 04:19:46 PM  
Just tell the judge you're hard of hearing.
Then keep saying "Huh?... What???" to anything he says after that.
 
2012-11-14 04:28:36 PM  
DeathByGeekSquad:
Actually, I reserve the right to complain because I chose not to endorse the lesser of two evils. There is a difference between being too lazy to vote, and having an actual reason to not vote. I do not trust either candidate, I am not willing to become an additional tally that they feel endorses their entire platform.


Then go to the polls, vote on the direct ballot measures (if any), and leave the choice for president blank.

Leave the whole thing blank if you want.

If you make the effort to go to the polls and cast a blank ballot, you can complain. If you stay home, you can't.
 
2012-11-14 04:29:29 PM  
The woman who showed up for duty at the goddamn OJ Simpson trial in full Starfleet dress uniform is my hero. She didn't act like a nut, she didn't try to draw undue attention to herself, she just acted calm and polite and rational. In full. Starfleet. Dress. Uniform.

Not service fatigues, mind you. This was a special occasion, and she knew the protocol.

Dismissed.
 
2012-11-14 04:32:45 PM  

midigod: thisisarepeat: DeathByGeekSquad: Actually, I reserve the right to complain because I chose not to endorse the lesser of two evils. There is a difference between being too lazy to vote, and having an actual reason to not vote. I do not trust either candidate, I am not willing to become an additional tally that they feel endorses their entire platform.

The jury reaper hasn't come knocking, but I'm actually quite curious about the process and have heard conflicting stories from various people who've been called.

Thisity farking this this.

In most states, there are six or more candidates. Perhaps that isn't the case in your two states. But I doubt it.


Fark Rye For Many Whores: thisisarepeat: ...

Speaking of you, is this a repeat? Or do we just have a lot of people trying and failing at the brain sweepstakes this way.


Yeah, because voting for a candidate that isnt either the Republican or Democrat candidate isnt completely farking futile. Before you make the retarded "it would send a message" argument, I'll point out that by that logic, low voter turnout would send an equally profound message and requires less effort and gas $. Since there was not a single candidate worth ANY of either (Pres or otherwise) i reserved all of my "give a shiat" for something that may actually make a tiny bit of difference in my life because whether i'm a slave to government or a slave to business makes no difference at all. But by all means, keep kicking that dead horse and believe with all your little heart that this country isnt irreparably farked and deservedly so. Good day.
 
2012-11-14 04:37:48 PM  
TAKE JURY DUTY.wmv

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1k4fYIUuAP8
 
2012-11-14 04:41:35 PM  
I've been called for jury duty more times than anyone I've ever met. I live in Jersey after all.

I've only actually been in a courtroom once. ONCE. And I was immediately dismissed by the defense attorney. I dunno why... Maybe I'm ugly. Maybe it's because I was pumping gas for a living at the time.

Every other time I had to go in, I sat in a room with a gazzillion other people and did crossword puzzles until they said we could go home.

The last time I was called, I postponed it 3 times. When it reached a point that I could postpone it no longer, I finally said, "Fine, I'll do it." They gave me a pool number so high that it never got called. So I was able to fulfill my jury duty duty without even having to go to the courthouse. That was the best jury duty ever!!
 
2012-11-14 04:56:48 PM  
I get called, waste my time
then get dropped
No lawyer will ever want me on a jury

the rest of you are farked
paid almost nothing,
questioned by lawyers
maybe forced to stay for weeks
good luck if you are self employed.

jury duty is like voting,
a warm body to be convinced of a point of view
for people who could not give a shiat about you beyond what you can do for them
 
2012-11-14 04:59:23 PM  

downstairs: Was in voir dire for a civil trial.  Some personal injury stuff.  Got asked what I do, and told the truth: I'm in IT and I also write Op-Ed pieces for some fairly large newspapers.  A recent one on tort reform.


Got links to any of the op-ed pieces?
 
2012-11-14 05:13:36 PM  

Cybernetic: downstairs: Was in voir dire for a civil trial.  Some personal injury stuff.  Got asked what I do, and told the truth: I'm in IT and I also write Op-Ed pieces for some fairly large newspapers.  A recent one on tort reform.

Got links to any of the op-ed pieces?


Not anymore.  I have them scanned in a portfolio PDF, but its not online.  Nor is the site.  I quit writing around maybe 2006 or so.  I got so sick of the pathetic, uninformed responses I'd get.  Regardless if someone agreed or disagreed with me.  That, of course, I had no problem with.  Also, this was around the time where things really had ramped up in terms of opinion pieces expected to be derpy from either the right or left.
 
People wanted Dick Morris, etc.  I was the opposite of that.  I do think I could have continued to be published on a regular basis regardless.  Even today.  But its hard to have your heart into it when well-reasoned articles get either a "meh" response (because they're well reasoned), or if I lean slightly left or right, I'm attacked as if my piece were derp.  I'm thick-skinned, but it kinda takes your heart out of it.
 
2012-11-14 05:20:39 PM  
When I got called I hated it because I worked nights so court was going on during my sleepy time. It was a car accident that some schmuck claimed that it caused his stomach to explode 3 years after the fact and he wanted the person that caused the accident to pay for it, eventhough she paid for the initial accident and medical stuff 3 years prior. Funy thing was the plantiffs lawyer was going on about the guy having no insurance and both his parents were doctors! WTF! He had a video of some doctor explaining what happend. The video was of very poor quality and I could barley understand it due to that and the doctor in it could hardly speak english.
 
2012-11-14 05:46:40 PM  
Maybe next time, she can be excused by claiming she's developmentally disabled. She has a pretty good case for that now.
 
2012-11-14 05:49:04 PM  

Slaves2Darkness: the ha ha guy: Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.

So if someone can't afford to live on $5/day while on jury duty, they shouldn't have the right to complain?

You have one duty as a citizen of the United States and that is to sit in judgement of a fellow citizen. Jury duty is literally a group of fellow citizens acting as the sovereign of the United States. I'm all ways amazed at the people who whine about a jury ruling, but do everything they can to get out of jury duty.


4.bp.blogspot.com

Yes, I've served on a jury. I didn't want to, but I was called and honored my obligation.
 
2012-11-14 05:50:33 PM  

ga362: Been on a couple of juries. The last time I was called I took my prescription bottle of hydrocodone. Told them I had migraines (which is true). Also told them I would gladly serve. However, if while serving I started to see the aura stuff, I would need to take a couple of the pills asap and be in a darkened room for 6 to 8 hours.

Asked to step down.


OT and having nothing to do with jury duty, but just so you know, I have personal experience and empathy. If the kaleidoscope vision shows up (fun while driving) I've got ten to fifteen minutes to get someplace dark, quiet, and cool where I will be undisturbed for the next 8 hours. Fortunately mine are rare (so no scrip) but when they do happen, life stops. I find that people who don't get them don't understand how nonfunctional you are during one, and that sucking it up is not an option.

/threadjack off
 
2012-11-14 05:53:34 PM  
Last time I was summoned (a few months ago, Dallas County), we sat around waiting for a few hours, then the jury services guy comes in and tells us nobody needs jurors that day. Everybody dismissed. We don't have to come back (if you don't get selected the first day, that's it, you're done until the next time you get a summons in the mail). We all looked at each other kinda like we'd won a lottery, then got the hell out. It was pretty awesome.

I wouldn't mind serving on a jury, I just never have.

It's jury duty. It's sitting there and listening to people talk. It's not hard labor, and you are getting paid for it. Just suck it up and do your civic duty. You've wasted much more time on truly worthless shiat than you'll ever "waste" on jury duty.
 
2012-11-14 06:00:16 PM  
Last time I got called for jury duty the first words we heard were "Thank you all for coming in to day, we really appreciate it"

I wonder how many people besides myself thought "...You really appreciate not having to send somebody to get us for not showing up?"
 
2012-11-14 06:02:38 PM  
People who compare jury duty to slavery are just ignorant. It's not like you're forced to perform a job, or those who refuse are punished.
 
2012-11-14 06:06:42 PM  

furiousidiot: People who compare jury duty to slavery are just ignorant. It's not like you're forced to perform a job, or those who refuse are punished.


Your handle fits you well.
 
2012-11-14 06:07:50 PM  
The first few times I've been called I worked for a company that was too small for me to miss more than a morning explaining it to the court.

Finally I got called last year and was happy to take a day or two off work to be on a jury. Of course they ended up pulling my name for Grand Jury and I couldn't afford to take a month off. The judge was really nice about dismissing me at least.
 
2012-11-14 07:11:01 PM  
I think everyone getting unemployment should be first to serve on jury duty. Aside from the obvious benefits, it would give those looking for jobs a sense of being needed. It's tough out there. Anyone see a downside?

And, once I lied to my job about being chosen. I'm not proud, but I really wanted a couple days off. I went in first thing in the morning, and was pretty much immediately dismissed. But, hey, it was a nice day and there's a certain wonder to being able to do things outside the office M-F between the hours of 9-5. It's a whole other world! Of course, I call my boss shortly after 5:00 (from home) and bemoan the fact I sat in a room all day, only to be told to come back the next day. That day, I slept in, went shopping, saw a matinee. Basically, I had a couple mental health days. And, since I don't have kids and I don't smoke, I chalked it up to "person reclaims equal time off work just because".

I also made sure I remembered to double the amount of the jury duty check when I was talking to co-workers about what a pain jury duty was...

I'd like to serve on a jury now. I have the time...
 
2012-11-14 07:45:45 PM  
Jury duty is a vital service that lets you see exactly how stupid and gullible your fellow citizens are, and realize that you have to participate or there will be no check whatsoever on these idiots.
 
2012-11-14 08:13:15 PM  
Or you could just not show up. That's what I do.

/haven't been arrested yet.
 
2012-11-14 08:18:21 PM  

Fark Rye For Many Whores: thisisarepeat: ...

Speaking of you, is this a repeat? Or do we just have a lot of people trying and failing at the brain sweepstakes this way.


From the looks of the headline it would seem that subby missed the story in March.

The first thread - Mar 21, 2012
 
2012-11-14 08:49:17 PM  
Was on a jury recently, thanks to all the assholes with stupid excuses, I was Juror 1, the foreman. I felt bad for Juror 13, she was the back-up and kept in a tiny room without A/C while we decided guilty or not....in all our minds we knew the man drunk....the police officer did not have video etc. The Police had no evidence. It sucked to have to stand up and say "Not Guilty" .....the drunk's lawyer did a great job, I hope someday the drunk runs over the lawyer.
 
2012-11-14 08:57:37 PM  

davidphogan: The first few times I've been called I worked for a company that was too small for me to miss more than a morning explaining it to the court.

Finally I got called last year and was happy to take a day or two off work to be on a jury. Of course they ended up pulling my name for Grand Jury and I couldn't afford to take a month off. The judge was really nice about dismissing me at least.


I co-own a business, no one is so important they can't be missed for a day. I am sure you call in sick and use vacation days.
 
2012-11-14 09:06:23 PM  
One hand: Any twelve people who can't find a way out of jury duty are not my peers.
Other hand: It's a duty and privilege of citizenship, and if you don't stand when called, you deserve scorn.
 
2012-11-14 09:22:39 PM  

GoldDude: Just tell the judge you're hard of hearing.
Then keep saying "Huh?... What???" to anything he says after that.


Awesome story a guy at my office was trying to get out of jury duty and he asked the most morally questionable person in the office who offered such advice as:
1." Speak only in Spanish"
2. "Tell the judge you have a baby and the baby has a cold (side note my co-worker doesn't have kids and when he said that he was told "No one will check on that.)
3. "Wear a head wrap" (he meant a turban)

And my personal favorite "Just say you're reeeeal cool with a cop." what does that even mean?!
 
2012-11-14 09:31:56 PM  

get real: davidphogan: The first few times I've been called I worked for a company that was too small for me to miss more than a morning explaining it to the court.

Finally I got called last year and was happy to take a day or two off work to be on a jury. Of course they ended up pulling my name for Grand Jury and I couldn't afford to take a month off. The judge was really nice about dismissing me at least.

I co-own a business, no one is so important they can't be missed for a day. I am sure you call in sick and use vacation days.


At that job even if I took a day off (I averaged two per year) I had to at least be able to answer my phones. Since I couldn't interrupt a trial to answer my phone, and if I didn't answer my phone it could cost us a significant portion of our daily revenue, it wasn't possible for me to take time off for jury duty with that job.

Also it wasn't guaranteed to just be a day. If I were chosen I had to be available until the trial was done. The court's instruction was to leave since they couldn't guarantee a trial (if I were chosen) would only take a day, and anything more could have significantly killed the business.

But I'm glad your personal experience applies to every business. Thanks for letting me know about all the time off I never knew I should have used.
 
2012-11-14 10:00:32 PM  

davidphogan: get real: davidphogan: The first few times I've been called I worked for a company that was too small for me to miss more than a morning explaining it to the court.

Finally I got called last year and was happy to take a day or two off work to be on a jury. Of course they ended up pulling my name for Grand Jury and I couldn't afford to take a month off. The judge was really nice about dismissing me at least.

I co-own a business, no one is so important they can't be missed for a day. I am sure you call in sick and use vacation days.

At that job even if I took a day off (I averaged two per year) I had to at least be able to answer my phones. Since I couldn't interrupt a trial to answer my phone, and if I didn't answer my phone it could cost us a significant portion of our daily revenue, it wasn't possible for me to take time off for jury duty with that job.

Also it wasn't guaranteed to just be a day. If I were chosen I had to be available until the trial was done. The court's instruction was to leave since they couldn't guarantee a trial (if I were chosen) would only take a day, and anything more could have significantly killed the business.

But I'm glad your personal experience applies to every business. Thanks for letting me know about all the time off I never knew I should have used.


d22zlbw5ff7yk5.cloudfront.net

I'm sure he'll come back with a dozen reasons why you're wrong and you actually could have taken the time off, or that if you COULDN'T you're a bad businessman and the business you were in was clearly destined to fail. Then some bullcrap about personal responsibility.

And now that I've said that, some comment about how it's cute I know how to repeat things I heard on TV, while conspicuously not mentioning that he was actually going to say all of those things.
 
2012-11-14 10:09:57 PM  
Granted I get compensated for it from work but I really don't mind it. I bring a coffee and a book. They give you an hour for lunch. Last time I hit up the UNO's across the street for brunch and a couple bloody mary's and I was home by 4.
 
2012-11-15 12:33:43 AM  
I got called, what? 8 years ago? Anyway, there were about a hundred in the pool. Turns out it was a first degree murder trial for a local idiot that tortured his infant son to death over a 3 or 4 week period. Burns, broken bones, just pure evil committed on a 10 week old baby. I admitted to reading every bit of news on the case (it was true; happened a half mile from where I was living at the time) and was dismissed.

I think being on a jury would be interesting, but not that one. The prosecutor (the infamous Mary Keenan Lacy of the Jonbenet Ramsey case) wanted first degree murder. She got a second degree conviction, and a 60 year sentence. I'd have been that a-hole on the jury holding out for first; life/no parole. The 17 year old mother served three years. She had an IQ of 80 or so, I believe. She was likely abused also, so I really save my thirst for revenge for that waste of air.

RIP, Tanner Dowler.

/nscsb
 
2012-11-15 12:43:24 AM  

Aarontology: People who try to get out of jury duty are like people who don't vote.

They deserve no right to complain about anything the government does.


The ones with no right to complain are those who consent and approve of the system, not those that object and refuse to participate.
 
2012-11-15 12:46:19 AM  

Tricky Chicken: be an engineer

I got booted (by the defense) right away. Many engineers I know had similar experiences. I think defense lawyers have something against engineers.


It's called rational thought, problem solving, and root cause analysis.
 
2012-11-15 02:13:42 AM  

downstairs: Don't lie, file for a hardship.  There's a system in place to handle these things.  I have no problem with someone trying to get out of jury duty if it honestly would cause them harm.  Just do it the right way.


I tried. But as it says in the link I posted above, it's almost impossible to actually qualify.

When I applied for a financial hardship, I literally did not have enough money to pay for more than one meal a day, let alone pay for basic utilities. My application was denied, and the judge yelled at me when I brought it up.

Slaves2Darkness: You have one duty as a citizen of the United States and that is to sit in judgement of a fellow citizen. Jury duty is literally a group of fellow citizens acting as the sovereign of the United States. I'm all ways amazed at the people who whine about a jury ruling, but do everything they can to get out of jury duty.


I agree completely.

Unfortunately, the bill collectors do not.

When I was called, my choice was literally between serving on the jury for a week, or paying my rent and keeping my house. I spent the next few months living on a friends couch...

Do we ask those in the military (drafted or otherwise) to lose everything they own while serving their country? No, they're given reasonable accommodations and legal protections to support themselves while they're serving. Why should jury duty be any different? Why should virtually every adult citizen be asked to participate in the "lose everything you own unless you're rich" lottery?

Did I whine about jury duty? Did I try every legal avenue available to get out of it? Absolutely. But I served anyway. I Gave my country exactly what it wanted. And what did I get in return? Evicted from my house, fired from my job (yes, I know it's illegal, but I didn't exactly have the money to pay a lawyer to fight it), and $25.

Next time I get called, I think I'll just ignore the summons. Sure, I'll go to jail, but at least I'll have a roof over my head and a few meals a day, which is far more than I ever got in return for doing my civic duty.
 
2012-11-15 09:48:00 AM  
I agree with "the ha ha guy".

I've served on a jury and would do it again - BUT I don't like how citizens are forced into it. You're not forced to vote like you are in Australia, and thats a GREAT thing. Forced service leads to undesirable outcomes.

And it is also ridiculous that one of the ways to get kicked off a jury is to know too much. They want the dumbest of the dumb to serve - as if that affects partiality. One of the easiest ways to get out of jury duty is proclaiming your knowledge to your right of jury nullification.
 
2012-11-15 10:00:00 AM  

the ha ha guy: downstairs: Don't lie, file for a hardship.  There's a system in place to handle these things.  I have no problem with someone trying to get out of jury duty if it honestly would cause them harm.  Just do it the right way.

I tried. But as it says in the link I posted above, it's almost impossible to actually qualify.

When I applied for a financial hardship, I literally did not have enough money to pay for more than one meal a day, let alone pay for basic utilities. My application was denied, and the judge yelled at me when I brought it up.

Slaves2Darkness: You have one duty as a citizen of the United States and that is to sit in judgement of a fellow citizen. Jury duty is literally a group of fellow citizens acting as the sovereign of the United States. I'm all ways amazed at the people who whine about a jury ruling, but do everything they can to get out of jury duty.

I agree completely.

Unfortunately, the bill collectors do not.

When I was called, my choice was literally between serving on the jury for a week, or paying my rent and keeping my house. I spent the next few months living on a friends couch...

Do we ask those in the military (drafted or otherwise) to lose everything they own while serving their country? No, they're given reasonable accommodations and legal protections to support themselves while they're serving. Why should jury duty be any different? Why should virtually every adult citizen be asked to participate in the "lose everything you own unless you're rich" lottery?

Did I whine about jury duty? Did I try every legal avenue available to get out of it? Absolutely. But I served anyway. I Gave my country exactly what it wanted. And what did I get in return? Evicted from my house, fired from my job (yes, I know it's illegal, but I didn't exactly have the money to pay a lawyer to fight it), and $25.

Next time I get called, I think I'll just ignore the summons. Sure, I'll go to jail, but at least I'll have a roof over my head and a few meals a ...


Not sure if serious.

Couldn't afford an attorney? You do know there is this thing called "contingency", where the lawyer takes a portion of your winnings, but gets nothing if you lose, right? You know how many lawyers would be salivating at the chance to take on an employer for a labor law violation like firing somebody over jury duty? You think a company wouldn't want to settle that (free hint, jury trial and a very unsympathetic jury).

Also, evicted from your house for missing one week of work? Not only did you not have even a few days of sick leave/vacation time to use, and didn't have enough money to cover it, and couldn't get a loan for the amount or sell some personal possessios, and a bazillion other things that would have to go wrong.

When I read on Fark about people who get months and months behind on mortgages before eviction, one missed (or late) payment is a little extreme.

If you were so financially fragile that missing a week of work caused your entire life to crumble, it wasn't the jury duty, it could have just as easily been a really bad case of the flu that left you bedridden for several days , or a bad car breakdown leaving you without a ride to work for a week while it was fixed, or a car accident that put you in the hospital for a while, or any one of a zillion other things.

However, not talking to an attorney about suing the pants off of whoever fired you for going to jury duty was dumb. Even after the lawyer took his cut, you'd still probably be just fine.
 
2012-11-15 11:03:30 AM  

Silverstaff: Also, evicted from your house for missing one week of work? Not only did you not have even a few days of sick leave/vacation time to use, and didn't have enough money to cover it, and couldn't get a loan for the amount or sell some personal possessios, and a bazillion other things that would have to go wrong.


For those of us living paycheck to paycheck a weeks worth of work would be a lot of lost money by itself and if he was fired for missing just a week then I'm willing to bet he worked a job that didn't have any benefits.

/Although I would've taken the employer to court if I had informed them of the jury duty and they fired me solely on this.
 
2012-11-15 11:12:54 AM  

leadmetal: Tricky Chicken: be an engineer

I got booted (by the defense) right away. Many engineers I know had similar experiences. I think defense lawyers have something against engineers.

It's called rational thought, problem solving, and root cause analysis.


This, but I'd add prosecutors to the "defense lawyers" side of that equation also. Neither side wants someone who will think for themselves.
 
2012-11-15 01:22:56 PM  

Silverstaff: Couldn't afford an attorney? You do know there is this thing called "contingency", where the lawyer takes a portion of your winnings, but gets nothing if you lose, right? You know how many lawyers would be salivating at the chance to take on an employer for a labor law violation like firing somebody over jury duty? You think a company wouldn't want to settle that (free hint, jury trial and a very unsympathetic jury).

Also, evicted from your house for missing one week of work? Not only did you not have even a few days of sick leave/vacation time to use, and didn't have enough money to cover it, and couldn't get a loan for the amount or sell some personal possessios, and a bazillion other things that would have to go wrong.


Officially, I was fired for "having a dirty uniform". Between the comments my boss made before going to jury duty and the timing of the firing (a few days after returning to work), it was obvious that the jury duty was the real reason, but there was no way to easily prove that in court. Of all the lawyers I spoke to, only one was willing to take the case at all, and he wanted $500 upfront just to send a letter asking for my job back.

As I said, I didn't even have money to pay for utilities or food. My paycheck didn't even cover all of my rent, which put me around three months behind at the time I was called in for jury duty. Had I not been fired I would have been closer to four months behind with the ~25% loss in income that month.

As for selling something or getting a loan, I had already exhausted those options months before. My only belongings were, literally, a blanket on the floor of the shack, two sets of clothes, and the one grocery bag of food I got for the month from the food bank.

My transportation was a coworker who lived in my area, my heat was a wood stove, and I had to go to my neighbor to take a shower or use a phone. And if I had good enough credit for a loan, I would have been able to find something better to rent than $800/mo for a one room shack that didn't even have interior walls or plumbing.

Also, what are these "vacation" and "sick days" you speak of? As I'm sure you're aware, there is no legal obligation to provide paid vacation or sick days, and it's actually quite rare to get any form of paid time off in a non-union blue-collar job.

Please don't take this the wrong way, but it seems to me that you simply can't comprehend what real poverty is like, or the fact that not every boss is a paragon of virtue who hands out paid time off to anyone who uses the word "please".
 
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